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Mirrorless camera sales overtake DSLRs - shock, horror! ;-)


Chris_L 5 5.1k United Kingdom
13 Jan 2015 1:08PM

Quote:For some subjects they equal or beat the DSLR, but they are far from a replacement. They maybe one day, but not yet.
So if they beat the DSLR for some subjects then people who shoot those subjects would see them as a replacement?

It doesn't make sense to say they aren't a replacement when people have replaced their DSLRs with mirrorless. It wasn't like we never had DSLRs and had gone up from simpler compacts, we had DSLRs and we *replaced* those DSLRs with mirrorless

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Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
13 Jan 2015 7:57PM
Most of the regular posters in these forums came to mirrorless via DSLR`s, this says something surely.

13 Jan 2015 8:34PM

Quote:... Pros are still using the behemoths - it's actually more surprising that there are successful pros who are quite happily using CSCs. The gap is still there, but the direction of travel only looks like going one way.

...


In motor world there are pizza delivery guys and bus drivers. They are both pros - go figure...
As for one direction - (D)SLR was one direction once when predominantly mirrorless compacts and randefinders were mass products of photographic world. It looks more like we are driving on a round ramp. And what is there behind the next turn is no more than a guess.
StrayCat 15 19.1k 3 Canada
13 Jan 2015 9:37PM

Quote:So if they beat the DSLR for some subjects then people who shoot those subjects would see them as a replacement?



Just an observation: No one can say that mirrorless, or more specifically MTF, is even visible in the near future, and maybe not in the next 10 years for pro wildlife photography. In fact I can't see MTF ever going beyond 300mm except with a teleconverter, so those pros are stuck with the "old" systems for many years to come. I don't see the manufacturers even considering it, so we'll always have a market for the big, clunky, ultra fast, extremely high quality pro camera equipment. That's not to say mirrorless is not great, it is, but it doesn't cover all the bases by any stretch of the imagination. The pros who shoot wildlife for a living may carry a high quality compact, or mirrorless camera, I'm sure most do, for general photography, but there's no replacement on the horizon for their main work tools. Canon and Nikon are the only serious players in that genre, and always have been. I don't regret it, because it was all fun, and definitely a learning experience; but I can't believe I didn't realise this long ago, like 4 or 5 years for me, as I've only been doing this for 11 years.
ChrisV Plus
12 2.3k 26 United Kingdom
14 Jan 2015 11:34AM

Quote:
Quote:So if they beat the DSLR for some subjects then people who shoot those subjects would see them as a replacement?



Just an observation: No one can say that mirrorless, or more specifically MTF, is even visible in the near future, and maybe not in the next 10 years for pro wildlife photography. In fact I can't see MTF ever going beyond 300mm except with a teleconverter, so those pros are stuck with the "old" systems for many years to come. I don't see the manufacturers even considering it, so we'll always have a market for the big, clunky, ultra fast, extremely high quality pro camera equipment. That's not to say mirrorless is not great, it is, but it doesn't cover all the bases by any stretch of the imagination. The pros who shoot wildlife for a living may carry a high quality compact, or mirrorless camera, I'm sure most do, for general photography, but there's no replacement on the horizon for their main work tools. Canon and Nikon are the only serious players in that genre, and always have been. I don't regret it, because it was all fun, and definitely a learning experience; but I can't believe I didn't realise this long ago, like 4 or 5 years for me, as I've only been doing this for 11 years.



Isn't that 300mm f2.8 still on the horizon? Remember that's a 600mm equ. in 35mm terms at f2.8. Stick the teleconvertor on and you've got 840mm f4. High grade.

Samsung are making real claims for the NX1 - I'd be surprised if it matches the best DSLRs for subject tracking, but we'll have to see. In any case they're advancing.

I can't think of any reason that's going to stop. Yes in the here and now, more longer, faster, better lenses and better subject tracking in DSLR. Five, ten years time? The mirror will be a niche market at best.
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
14 Jan 2015 8:11PM
Do any of theses silly sales figures really matter.
mikehit 10 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
14 Jan 2015 8:36PM
They will matter to marketing men and developers to see which way the market is swinging - companieslike Panasonic do not data trawl to create them for no reason. As a knock-on they will be of of interest to (some) people interested in gear, technological developments ro simply numbers.
Whether the latter draw the same conclusions as the former is a different matter.
It seems they don't matter to you (though I note tthat hasn;t stopped you reading and contributing).
StrayCat 15 19.1k 3 Canada
14 Jan 2015 10:09PM

Quote:Isn't that 300mm f2.8 still on the horizon?


I believe it's a 300mm f4, big difference. An Olympus 300mm f2.8 would run you over $7000.00.

If we're talking replacing pro nature/wildlife equipment, Olympus, Panasonic, and Samsung, are way behind in the dust.

I f you have the time and inclination have a look at what they're up against: Nikon D4S and Canon
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
14 Jan 2015 10:56PM

Quote:They will matter to marketing men and developers to see which way the market is swinging - companieslike Panasonic do not data trawl to create them for no reason. As a knock-on they will be of of interest to (some) people interested in gear, technological developments ro simply numbers.
Whether the latter draw the same conclusions as the former is a different matter.
It seems they don't matter to you (though I note tthat hasn;t stopped you reading and contributing).



To me, no they don`t, if a smaller camera can do the same job as a DSLR (for my needs) and do it equally well, then I`m all in.

I do like innovation, especially if its been offered in smaller packages.

I`d quite like a set of these to go with it all, I`d be able to leave mt studio heads and power packs at homeSmile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBZgc74xdGw
ChrisV Plus
12 2.3k 26 United Kingdom
15 Jan 2015 11:43AM

Quote:
Quote:Isn't that 300mm f2.8 still on the horizon?


I believe it's a 300mm f4, big difference. An Olympus 300mm f2.8 would run you over $7000.00.

If we're talking replacing pro nature/wildlife equipment, Olympus, Panasonic, and Samsung, are way behind in the dust.

I f you have the time and inclination have a look at what they're up against: Nikon D4S and Canon



Actually, my apologies - it was a 4/3 rather than m4/3 lens I was looking at and it is indeed a very expensive optic. But less so than a similar speed lens covering the same magnification from CaNikon. It's a shame there isn't a MFT camera at the moment that could really benefit ideally from being paired with it. Whilst I think that will change in future, I'd agree there is nothing like either the range of coverage, nor naturally the legacy that is available to the two leaders in the pro arena. I guess if I were interested in sports and wildlife I'd be frustrated by the slow development of MFT in those areas. I guess it's a bit of a chicken and egg thing. Until there's sufficient demand there aren't going to be economies of scale in producing such optics - and perhaps whilst tracking is still an issue, relatively little point.

In the now if you really want an effective system for long range action at a competitive level, you've little option than to go with one of the big two.
Steppenwolf 8 1.2k
15 Jan 2015 1:29PM

Quote:
Just an observation: No one can say that mirrorless, or more specifically MTF, is even visible in the near future, and maybe not in the next 10 years for pro wildlife photography. In fact I can't see MTF ever going beyond 300mm except with a teleconverter, so those pros are stuck with the "old" systems for many years to come. I don't see the manufacturers even considering it, so we'll always have a market for the big, clunky, ultra fast, extremely high quality pro camera equipment. That's not to say mirrorless is not great, it is, but it doesn't cover all the bases by any stretch of the imagination. The pros who shoot wildlife for a living may carry a high quality compact, or mirrorless camera, I'm sure most do, for general photography, but there's no replacement on the horizon for their main work tools. Canon and Nikon are the only serious players in that genre, and always have been. I don't regret it, because it was all fun, and definitely a learning experience; but I can't believe I didn't realise this long ago, like 4 or 5 years for me, as I've only been doing this for 11 years.



And Sony.

I suppose the reason why the smaller sensor mirrorless "EVIL" camera systems don't seem to have prioritised long lenses is because they see their target market as being people who are downsizing their equipment - so big lenses might not sell vey well, especially for the APS-C mirrorless. But it seems to me that the smaller sensor really comes into its own with long (i.e. small AOV) lenses for the simple reason that the small sensor's inherent big DOF is a big advantage.

Yet the only mirrorless to offer a decent wildlife lens is Nikon 1.

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