Affinity Photo - professional photo editing with 50% off!

MUST HAVE lenses for wedding photography?


thewilliam2 2 1.3k
23 Jan 2019 11:03AM
I shot my first wedding in the early 1970s, I used one camera and the standard 55mm f1.8 standard lens because that was all I had. This was by no means unusual and we just found a way of getting the shots we needed.

Unfortunately, we can't be sure of choosing the right kit until we have experience. When my wife started professional wedding photography, she used the family kit. Although the Kodak DCS760 was the best digital DSLR in its day, she hated it because it was heavy and she didn't like the "pro" lenses that went with it.

After 6 months or so, she was in a position to choose her own kit. Initially, she tried to do without the "pro" zooms but soon learned why most other professionals were using them. Some 15 years later, she still keeps the D2Xs bodies for studio work with the 17-55mm and 70-200mm for all her work.

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

speybay 15 7 United Kingdom
9 Jun 2019 9:11PM
I've been asked to take some photo's at a indoor 60th anniversary party at a local hotel, I've never done an event like this before and could do with some advice. I'm not a professional but I thought it would be a interesting challenge.
I have a Canon7d Mk11 , so what are the best lenses and settings, I enjoy photography but have not good knowledge on settings. Any advice would be gratefully received. Ian.


speybay 15 7 United Kingdom
9 Jun 2019 9:20PM

Quote:Sure you can.

Itís alright a seasoned wedding photographer saying ďhereís how I shot a whole wedding on 35mmĒ but heís got the experience to do that. Try that as a newbie and youíre going to miss a lot and make a lot of mistakes. And itís all going to look a bit samey.

A 70-200 is going to get you those off the wall shots when you suddenly spot a couple of kids playing 50 yds away or when granny 1 is chatting to granny 2 over the other side of the room. In the hands of a second photographer itís going to get you those close ups of the group while youíre at 35mm getting the whole shebang.

You really need a fast lens around the 24-70 mark. You could go and get a 35mm, a 50mm and an 85mm and work that way but how are you at changing lenses real fast, so you donít miss a moment or an opportunity. Wedding photography has changed. It was Ok in the days when you delivered 20 shots of the whole day but now people expect hundreds and you start having to constantly change lenses and youíll cause yourself a whole day of stress and grief.

You have to keep it simple at your end because the one person who has to keep calm and on the ball at a wedding is you.

If you had to buy just one lens and you wanted it to make life easy on the day, allowed you take group photos, portraits, close-ups (back off and crop later) and will go for years, then look for a second hand 24-70L even if itís a Mk1 without stabilisation. Itís going to set you back twice (maybe more) than your £300 but you wonít be sweating it on the day.

speybay 15 7 United Kingdom
9 Jun 2019 9:52PM

Quote:
Quote:Sure you can.

Itís alright a seasoned wedding photographer saying ďhereís how I shot a whole wedding on 35mmĒ but heís got the experience to do that. Try that as a newbie and youíre going to miss a lot and make a lot of mistakes. And itís all going to look a bit samey.

A 70-200 is going to get you those off the wall shots when you suddenly spot a couple of kids playing 50 yds away or when granny 1 is chatting to granny 2 over the other side of the room. In the hands of a second photographer itís going to get you those close ups of the group while youíre at 35mm getting the whole shebang.

You really need a fast lens around the 24-70 mark. You could go and get a 35mm, a 50mm and an 85mm and work that way but how are you at changing lenses real fast, so you donít miss a moment or an opportunity. Wedding photography has changed. It was Ok in the days when you delivered 20 shots of the whole day but now people expect hundreds and you start having to constantly change lenses and youíll cause yourself a whole day of stress and grief.

You have to keep it simple at your end because the one person who has to keep calm and on the ball at a wedding is you.

If you had to buy just one lens and you wanted it to make life easy on the day, allowed you take group photos, portraits, close-ups (back off and crop later) and will go for years, then look for a second hand 24-70L even if itís a Mk1 without stabilisation. Itís going to set you back twice (maybe more) than your £300 but you wonít be sweating it on the day.


thewilliam2 2 1.3k
9 Jun 2019 11:37PM
There's a lot to be said for keeping kit simple. I'd suggest that a pair of camera bodies with a wide zoom on one and a tele zoom on the other would be a good bet. Keep spare kit in your bag so that you can carry on working if anything breaks.

You might spend too much time thinking if you have too many lenses!


Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.