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My D5100 please help.


MrBMorris 14 27 United Kingdom
4 Aug 2011 11:15AM
Hey there,

It has been a very long time since I posted but nothing has really changed, I still have no idea and I still feel clueless in every sense. I just bought myself a Nikon D5100 and there's a few things I would like to achieve but I don't seem to be able to. I know this is just me but I was hoping there was someone out there that could get through to me lol.

I would like to be able to do some HDR Photos, the ghostly water effect and night photos where the subject isn't pale and washed out with everything in the back ground in focus, These are my goals for now. I'm fed up of forever using the "auto" mode.

Hope to hear from someone soon.

Many thanks

Ben.
NEWMANP 13 1.6k 574 United Kingdom
4 Aug 2011 12:01PM
firstly dont use the auto mode, thats sorted easily,

can i suggest that you do a search for recent postings that fit the work you want to acheive and ask the poster by pm how they made the image.

pretty much everyone i know on site would be happy to tell uou all about how its done.

the bit about hdr i would leave until you get everything else the way you want it. look in mine by all means and if anthing fits the bill, ask and i will try to help.

Phil
Jestertheclown 13 8.5k 253 England
4 Aug 2011 1:28PM
Sound advice from Phil.

I can't help you with HDR or ghostly water, I don't like either, so I don't attempt them but there are plenty of people on here that do produce them and do a good job.
I'll help with anything else if I can.
And as Phil says, stop using 'auto'.

Bren.
NEWDIGIT 10 401 United Kingdom
4 Aug 2011 3:22PM
It sounds a little obvious but read the manaul practice practice practice then read read read.
Im still reading and practicing but think Im getting there SLOWLY
cameracat 17 8.6k 61 Norfolk Island
4 Aug 2011 7:55PM

Quote:I would like to be able to do some HDR Photos


The D5100 has a 3 frame bracket option, If you delve into the shadowwy depths of the manual you'll find how to use it, But basics are set for exposure bracketing about 1 stop should do it, Then with camera on tripod run the bracket set ( as per manual ) You will end up with 3 images, One pefect exposure, One 1 stop over, One 1 stop under......Grin

Now run these through your chosen HDR software........Job done......Wink


Quote:the ghostly water effect and night photos


The D5100 is no different to any other DSLR, The effect you desire is achieved with a longish exposure, Camera on tripod etc etc, That said if you want to do this in normal bright daylight, You may need to get yourself a ND filter to slow the shutter speed down, Though the D5100 will go down to ISO 100, That might not be low or slow enough without using the ND filter.

A cheapish option is a screw fit ND for the lens your using during this type of shoot, The 18-55 often supplied as a kit with the D5100 is a mighty fine lens, So check out the 52mm ND filters.

Unless you want to throw buckets of money at square filters and all the bits & bobs required to fit and use that system.

Lastly, The D5100 is a fantastic little camera, You would be wise to forget the " AUTO " mode if you want to pull the best from it, Also set it to Adobe RGB colour space and Shoot " RAW " ..Grin

Then it gets better and better, Almost as good as my D700.....Wink
MrBMorris 14 27 United Kingdom
6 Aug 2011 12:39PM
Hey, I have been reading the manual but things just aren't sticking with me, I'll keep going through it and see if it works it's way through.

I'll have a look at some of these filters & I've got myself a tripod. Is there any recommendations for the software, PhotoMatrix seems popular.

I was kinda just looking for a few tips and starting points as I get lost in menus and all sorts. Thanks for all your help.
Jestertheclown 13 8.5k 253 England
6 Aug 2011 1:53PM
Photomatix (there's no "r") is a programme for producing HDR images which is perhaps a bit ambitious at this point in time.
If you want some software to practise editing with; I'm asuming you have none, there plenty of freebies to be had from the internet.
None of them are a patch on Photoshop but for your purposes that doesn't matter.
Have a look at some of these:

Picasa

FastStone

Pixlr

Of those (and there are many others) Picasa is a good starting point, many of uis still use it for certain functions and Pixlr is the most powerful. Pixlr will allow you to carry out some pretty serious editing. It's got many of the tools that you'll find in Photoshop or Elements. Also, it's web-based so there's no need to download it, although I'd recomend keeping a bookmark, which means that you can access it from anywhere that you can get onto the internet.

And what about the software that came with your camera?
How do you convert RAW files?
Do you use RAW?
6 Aug 2011 2:00PM

Quote:Photomatix (there's no "r") is a programme

Program (there's no extra me) TongueTongueTongueTongueTongue

Couldn't resist - sorry Smile
Jestertheclown 13 8.5k 253 England
6 Aug 2011 2:23PM
There is in this country Barrie!
6 Aug 2011 2:44PM
Not for a computer PROGRAM there isn't Wink
Jestertheclown 13 8.5k 253 England
6 Aug 2011 3:20PM
Ha! ha!

Depends where you look!

On a serious note, I work as a teaching assistant in a school in England and we'd never consider allowing our children to use "program" in any context. The same would go for "favor", "color" or any of the Americanisms that are gradually ruining the English language.
Ultimately, I guess we're banging our heads against a brick wall but there's still some pride to be had in knowing how to use the English language correctly.
NEWDIGIT 10 401 United Kingdom
11 Aug 2011 8:56AM
Ghostly water with the D5100
Good steady tripod, not forgetting to switch off any optical stabilisation.
ND filter possibly x4 or perhaps x8 (52 mm screw in ok).
Aperture priority and set f16-f22, dependent on dof.
Manual focus fire of a shot then check live view and histogram watch for clipping of shadows and highlights apply compensation if there is clipping then repeat
User_Removed 11 4.6k 1 Scotland
11 Aug 2011 10:19AM

Quote:Ghostly water with the D5100
Good steady tripod, not forgetting to switch off any optical stabilisation.
ND filter possibly x4 or perhaps x8 (52 mm screw in ok).
Aperture priority and set f16-f22, dependent on dof.
Manual focus fire of a shot then check live view and histogram watch for clipping of shadows and highlights apply compensation if there is clipping then repeat



Possibly better to focus before fitting ND filter.

Generally, I'd prefer to use a stronger ND and a larger aperture if that is possible. Aim for a shutter speed of between 1/10 and 1/2 second and experiment to find the effect that pleases you most. As well as tripod, also use cable release or self-timer.
MrBMorris 14 27 United Kingdom
11 Aug 2011 9:04PM
Hey there,

Sorry for the late responses! I'm a bus driver and I've been working the night shift and got caught up in all the Tottenham riots etc.

Thanks for all the advise, does anyone know if this software works with Mac or what software works best with Mac, I only have iPhoto re-installed on it currently.

I've been reading about RAW but I'm trying to get my head around converting it to JPEG after etc. I'm reading the manual and magazines. I'm also heading out this weekend with a fellow EPZ user in the hope of grasping it better.

Does anyone have any starting points on what I should try so I can get used to it.

I hope to get better than what I've already got in my portfolio

Ben.
peterjones 19 5.2k 1 United Kingdom
12 Aug 2011 8:45AM
from what I am reading you need to get a handle on enough photography basics to get you a competent image and to be able to utilise the controls on your camera before you start on HDR and misty water; I do run basic photography courses but I am too far away from you; are there any epz members near you that could help?

To be specific however misty water is created by supporting your camera on a tripod and leaving the shutter open for anything up to 30 seconds; different shutter speeds will give you different effects; HDR can be achieved by many ways (depending on your own definition of HDR) however generally it is achieved by bracketing several exposures of the same scene usually shot in RAW format and combining the images in some kind of software e.g.Photomatix or Photoshop for a "lesser" effect; the best time for night shots is paradoxically not at night but at twilight when the ambient light source broadly matches the reflected light from artificial sources.

Learning about photography is great fun, 20 years on and I am still enjoying learning, all the best,

Peter.

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