My Rights on a second hand dishwasher that went on fire.


JonnyNI Plus
8 2.2k
28 Sep 2014 8:26AM
I bought a second hand dishwasher from a local charity outlet last month as my own had seen better days and this looked like a good upgrade for a reasonable price.

Yesterday we were out and about doing the usual Saturday stuff arrived home late afternoon stuck the dishwasher on and sat down to a well deserved cuppa. After about 20 mins the telly went off so I went into the hall to check the fuse box. From here I smelt smoke coming from the kitchen, I entered the kitchen to find smoke coming from the dishwasher.

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And by the time I got it disconnected and pulled out into the back yard the flames had started.

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All in all a very lucky escape and in a way I'm glad that I had bought it rather than a pensioner or someone that couldn't have got it out of their house.

On further investigation I discovered that there was a recall on this appliance (something that I hadn't even thought of looking into prior to the incident)

My question is should it have been up to the seller to ensure that this appliance safe prior to sale or was it up to me the consumer to check ?

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keithh 15 25.5k 33 Wallis And Futuna
28 Sep 2014 8:47AM
The law says that although your expectations (of performance etc) should be realistic, you have the same rights under the sale if goods act as any other purchase.
Andy_Cundell 8 1.1k 5 England
28 Sep 2014 8:52AM
Well said keithh.........it should have been electrically tested and electrically safe before you purchased it. I'm sure you will have no problems with the charity shop, after all, they rely on us for money!

Andy C
franken Plus
16 4.9k 4 United Kingdom
28 Sep 2014 8:56AM
Charity shops can only sell second hand electrical goods if they've been tested.

Is there a green sticker on it ?

Ken
JonnyNI Plus
8 2.2k
28 Sep 2014 9:27AM
Yes it has been tested but a PAT test won't show up any manufacturing issues. Should they have checked for recalls on the appliance ?
JonnyNI Plus
8 2.2k
28 Sep 2014 9:29AM
As its a charity shop all I want is the removal of the dishwasher and a refund for the money paid. I won't be taking it any further other than trying to ensure the same thing doesn't happen to anyone else.
thewilliam 11 6.1k
28 Sep 2014 9:49AM
When a heavy item of electrical kit has been moved, there's always a risk of damage. Was there a warranty of any sort? Did the dishwasher fail on first use?

Modern "fuse-boards" have earth leakage protection which often cuts the power before a fire starts. How old is the fuse-board? I had ours upgraded to RCBO so that just the offending circuit would be de-powered in the event of a fault. I found it most inconvenient to lose power completely every time a light bulb failed!
JonnyNI Plus
8 2.2k
28 Sep 2014 9:53AM
Home electrics are fine. As I said this appliance had a manufacturers recall on it due to it being a fire risk. I just found out a bit late.
thewilliam 11 6.1k
28 Sep 2014 11:41AM

Quote: As I said this appliance had a manufacturers recall on it due to it being a fire risk. I just found out a bit late.


Just get some documentary evidence, such as a website printout, and ask the charity shop for a refund.

Or you could be really cheeky and contact the manufacturer direct, quoting the case of Donoghue v Stevenson if you need to. Since this case, responsibility for safety and other liabilities for a product isn't limited to the original purchaser but is transferred to subsequent owners. The test would be whether the machine would have caught fire while in the possession of the original owner and it's pretty clear that it might have done.
Dave_Canon 13 1.5k United Kingdom
28 Sep 2014 7:30PM
I would certainly have thought that it was worth contacting the manufacturer as well as letting the Charity shop know about the issue. The Charity shop may back up your claim against the manufacturer by confirming that the appliance passed normal safety testing. Perhaps the manufacturer would wish to replace the machine.

Dave
Paul Morgan 18 19.3k 6 England
28 Sep 2014 8:17PM
I would be very surprised if the charity shop actually tested this appliance, its not quite the same as quickly plugging in a kettle.
keithh 15 25.5k 33 Wallis And Futuna
28 Sep 2014 8:24PM
Maybe not, but by law they are required to have it PAT tested.
JonnyNI Plus
8 2.2k
28 Sep 2014 8:33PM

Quote:I would be very surprised if the charity shop actually tested this appliance, its not quite the same as quickly plugging in a kettle.


I'm just surprised that they wouldn't check for possible recalls as well as PAT testing.
Chris_L 5 5.1k United Kingdom
28 Sep 2014 8:40PM
Even the likes of Currys selling this new couldn't forsee the manufacturing fault. PAT test is fairly basic looking for earth leakage, short circuits etc.

It would be entirely unreasonable to expect a charity shop to do any more than a PAT test.

Quote:I'm just surprised that they wouldn't check for possible recalls

I'm not; I don't check when I buy second hand stuff from Gumtree or ebay, you didn't check...
DavidLaverty 8 814 Northern Ireland
28 Sep 2014 10:44PM
Well done for grabbing your camera and getting some shots - way more important than putting the fire out Grin

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