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Nikon D80


29 Nov 2008 11:06PM
what is the d80 classed as? some shops say advanced entry level, some say enthusiast and others say semi-professional. so what exactly is it?
strawman 16 22.1k 16 United Kingdom
29 Nov 2008 11:10PM
I have never understood the semi professional tag, or prosumer. Does ot work smoothly and silently at a press event, then blow a raspberry at an inappropriate moment?

I would say a camera for enthusiasts, or an advanced entry level was correct.

A professional camera would have the longer life shutter/mirror mechanism and a metal body I think, but that is perception. After all you could use one to take images and sell them, so that should count as professional.

So I would count camera like the 30D or D200 you were looking at earlier as the entry level professional camera.
User_Removed 16 17.9k 8 Norway
29 Nov 2008 11:15PM

Quote:What is the d80 classed as?


Does it matter?

No.

It's a great tools and can deliver first class images. The important 'bit' is YOU...

Wink
NEWMANP 12 1.6k 574 United Kingdom
29 Nov 2008 11:15PM
i though Nikon tagged the D200 then D300 as the semi pro camera as opposed to the D80.
pHIL
30 Nov 2008 12:21PM
thats what i thought
Nick_w Plus
13 4.3k 99 England
30 Nov 2008 2:04PM
As far as I can recall the D80 (an excellent camera BTW) is very similar to the D200. It has the same sensor, so similar image quality. It has 4 pin remote release scoket, which is a bit tempormental (on mine at least) the D200 has 10 pin. It can only bracket 3 shots which is not ideal for HDR, but there is a work around if you want more in the bracket.

The reason why it might be classed as an entry level, is its a bit dated, superceded by the D90 it doesn't stop it been a great camera tho. I will be updating shortly to either D300/700, but only because I want better noise performance at higher ISO's, more FPS and better AF performance for wildlife. If I was to continue solely with landscapes I wouldn't bother.

HTH
Nick
30 Nov 2008 5:05PM
is a nikon d80 good for landscapes because i do like them.
strawman 16 22.1k 16 United Kingdom
30 Nov 2008 7:09PM
Here is the good news. The D80 will be fine for a wide variety of photography, landscapes no problems, portraits good etc etc. I would say it and cameras like Canons 450D , or Sony's A300 and lots more, will give you a chance to take and experiment a lot with photography.

for landscapes can I ask that you get a half decent tripod, and possibly a set of graduated filters. Armed with that and a lens like the kit one, you can get started. I started with a 300D and a Sigma 18-50 kit like lens (it was under 100). and to be honest, the things when my images were assessed that were picked up on were more to do with composition, view point, editing even. In short at low ISO the camera was capable of a good quality A4 print if the lens was at f8 or smaller.

The D80 is a better camera than my old 300D, s in my view it is a fine camera for you to develop skills on. Why a tripod, well it allows you to keep the shutter speed and so ISO down low, and so you can work the camera at its best quality settings. Plus working on a tripod slows you down and it cam make you think more before you push the shutter.

Just a view. But honest a D80, 450D, A300 etc etc all make fine cameras, and so would a 2nd hand 20D, 30D , D200 etc. With more money you tend to get more robust cameras, or faster focusing, or water proofing, that sort of stuff. I bet at ISO200 and an A4 print the results of a D80 will look so like those from a D300 that you will struggle to tell which is best. The D300 will do better at sports and low light shooting.
Nick_w Plus
13 4.3k 99 England
30 Nov 2008 9:43PM
I can vouch for the D80 for landscapes. As John says invest in quality tripod (something like the 190 or 055 from Manfrotto), a cable release, and set of filters. Set the camera up with the mirror up setting (its not true mirror up tho, just a delay before opening the shutter). A set of filters, like the lee holder, but if you on a budget get the Hitech filters, you can get a set for the price of one Lee (hard edge tend to give better results on a crop sensor).

The lens John quotes is good for starters but a Sigma 10-20 is outstanding, particularly stopped down, which is how you will use it for 90% of landscape work. Just watch vignetting, remove UV filter if using at the wide end (from experience). Allow for room around the image when composing with the D80 as the viewfinder, I cant remember exactly but I think its about 90% FOV.

You can get tremendous A3 prints from the D80 (not bad A2 either) particularly at ISO100, where noise is not a problem at all.

Yes newer models have more bells and whistles but you don't need them really for landscapes.

HTH

Nick
dragarth 16 247 1 Scotland
3 Dec 2008 11:58PM
love my d80 and wouldnt be without it.
use the kit18-135 and a sigma 20mm1.8 prime for landscapes with a manfrotto pod and get the results I want.

sean
mroch06 12 4 United Kingdom
6 Dec 2008 3:11AM

Quote:As far as I can recall the D80 (an excellent camera BTW) is very similar to the D200. It has the same sensor, so similar image quality. It has 4 pin remote release scoket, which is a bit tempormental (on mine at least) the D200 has 10 pin. It can only bracket 3 shots which is not ideal for HDR, but there is a work around if you want more in the bracket.

The reason why it might be classed as an entry level, is its a bit dated, superceded by the D90 it doesn't stop it been a great camera tho. I will be updating shortly to either D300/700, but only because I want better noise performance at higher ISO's, more FPS and better AF performance for wildlife. If I was to continue solely with landscapes I wouldn't bother.

HTH
Nick

mroch06 12 4 United Kingdom
6 Dec 2008 3:13AM
Hi Nick,

What is the HDR get around? I'm not really getting the results I hoped for using D80 and Photomatix. I understand people are using 7 exposures to get really good results.
I would be really grateful for a reply.

Thanks

Martin

ps Great show case!!
Nick_w Plus
13 4.3k 99 England
6 Dec 2008 8:48AM

Quote:What is the HDR get around?


Its not really how many exposures that matter, just covering all the dynamic range, 90% of the time 3 shots is sufficient, 2 stops apart.

But the work around is as follows. Ensure its on the tripod very secure. Put in aperture priority. Dial in -3 stops, then do a 2 stop bracket. As carefully as possible (making sure not to nudge the tripod) dial in +3 the do a +/- 2 stop bracket. (just make sure you dont exceed the 30 second max). you should then have 6 images 2 stops apart i.e +/-5 stops.

The key to HDR (in my opinion) is to get as "real" as possible, just play with the settings - most of the problems you see with HDR are caused by the light smoothing settings too low, I rarely move it from +2, even when I do its only for a part of the image that I will either blend with one of the originals, or a seperate HDR conversion. Also watch the micro contrast setting. Still not all subjects are suitable, landscapes are very hit and miss, particularly if theres a lot of movement or a lot of green.

HTH

Nick
oldmalt 11 2 United Kingdom
27 Dec 2008 9:01AM
Have had a D80 for about a year - constant problem with filthy sensor, have had to have it cleaned three times and now it needs doing again. Never had this problem with D70 that I had that for four years and never needed cleaning once.

Is this a particular problem with D80 or do the extra pixels on the 80 make it show up more?

oldmalt
Rob_Taylor 16 661 5 Wales
27 Dec 2008 3:40PM
From my experience, my D80 was no more prone to dust than my D70. Only ever wet cleaned each of them once. Usually got away with a blow on the sensor from the rocket blower.

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