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Nikon D800 - First Impressions


User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
10 Jul 2012 10:52PM
What have Asia had that we haven't?

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Carabosse Plus
12 39.8k 269 England
10 Jul 2012 11:03PM

Quote:What have Asia had that we haven't?


Lots of factories which make things. Smile
Coleslaw 10 13.4k 28 Wales
11 Jul 2012 7:11AM

Quote:What have Asia had that we haven't?
Lots of factories which make things. Smile


Lol....
First of all, there doesn't seem to have any shortage of d800 or 5d3.
Then, d800 is 5-600 cheaper, and 5d3 is 1000 cheaper there to here.
mattw 11 5.2k 10 United Kingdom
11 Jul 2012 10:38AM
Those ebay Hong Kong retailers have to make their money some how....
Coleslaw 10 13.4k 28 Wales
11 Jul 2012 10:46AM
Matt, those are the prices I saw when I was back in Malaysia last month.
Carabosse Plus
12 39.8k 269 England
11 Jul 2012 10:53AM
You've got to factor in 20% VAT, shipping charges.................... and the "UK premium" cos we're all considered to be rich! Grin
Coleslaw 10 13.4k 28 Wales
11 Jul 2012 11:00AM

Quote:cos we're all considered to be rich!

Aye, or stupid....Tongue
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
14 Aug 2012 8:11PM
A month farther down the line and it is maybe worth recording what my over-riding "first impression" of the camera is.

After 5 months of use I think the most important factor, for me, is that a completely different mindset can be applied to questions of photographic composition.

Because the resolution is so high that very sharp and detailed large prints can be made from quite small portions of the frame, the necessity to get composition right in the viewfinder becomes far less important. Instead you can - and probably should - leave lots of space around the area that might eventually be chosen for the final picture and the real attention to composition can be given later.

Indeed, the possibility of producing several, quite different, compositions from a single exposure becomes an everyday possibility.

Purists might say, of course, that this is not necessarily a good thing; that it will lead to sloppy camera work. But, for me, it is a major positive in that it facilitates a greater degree of creativity. As I said, however, it does require a different mindset to be applied at the time of making the exposure.
15 Aug 2012 4:03PM

Quote:Because the resolution is so high that very sharp and detailed large prints can be made from quite small portions of the frame, the necessity to get composition right in the viewfinder becomes far less important. Instead you can - and probably should - leave lots of space around the area that might eventually be chosen for the final picture and the real attention to composition can be given later. (snipped).
Purists might say, of course, that this is not necessarily a good thing;


Those with a D800 are having to think outside the traditional DSLR box.
If the 300 f4 VR update is announced at Photokina next month I might well use it for dragonflies and butterflies in 2013.
If I do it may be in DX mode for 15 MP with AF points covering most of the picture area and the extra depth of field effect. I may add a 1.4x - less of an issue with the improved AF.
15 MP macro at 450mm DX equivalent angle of view or 630mm equivalent with a 1.4 with VR was undreamed of less than 6 months ago.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
15 Aug 2012 6:52PM
That's right Len. But why shoot in DX mode rather than in FX, thus leaving yourself the option of cropping to DX (or thereabouts) later? Frame rate, maybe? Card space? There are possible reasons but I think I would personally prefer to use the maximum frame size and crop later to suit the required result.
JJGEE 10 6.5k 18 England
15 Aug 2012 7:01PM

Quote:Because the resolution is so high that very sharp and detailed large prints can be made from quite small portions of the frame .....


Not the D800, but this exactly what I quickly discovered with the Full Frame Sony A900.

Of, course one should still shoot with the mindset of cropping "in camera" as near to possible to the envisaged final image.


Quote:Indeed, the possibility of producing several, quite different, compositions from a single exposure becomes an everyday possibility.

Agree with that statement as well Smile
17 Aug 2012 9:25AM

Quote:why shoot in DX mode rather than in FX, thus leaving yourself the option of cropping to DX (or thereabouts) later?

As I said if the aim is to get 450-630mm equivalent angle of view for macro subjects in the middle of the frame at good A3 print quality - why not DX mode?
Insect shooters now instantly the aim of these equivalent focal length are much greater working distance when shooting UK insects, including on the wing, to more easily get images that were much more difficult to achieve pre D800 FX file sizes.
A D400 24MP DX body could be even better apart from less screen AF point coverage, but right now that does not exist.
Those of us using a D800 know how much the huge uncropped file sizes slow down our existing computer processing time, fill up hard drives etc.
Maybe in 2 years time most of us will have computers and external hard drives with at least USB 3, 4 times current affordable size hard drive computer packages and Windows 8 or a 2,000+ Mac laptop.
I am not complaining but D800's do not come cheap in the sense of class 10 cards for full size video, the need to buy more storage space, for many ideally an upgraded computer and maybe an A2 printer.
NEWDIGIT 4 401 United Kingdom
24 Aug 2012 4:14PM
Thanks enormously for the very exhaustive real life testing.
This sought of testing is far more realistic to us NON techies
I had been considering going full frame now Im sold.
Next step is to shop around for best prices as they seem to be rising day by day
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
24 Aug 2012 7:46PM

Quote:Thanks enormously for the very exhaustive real life testing.
This sought of testing is far more realistic to us NON techies




I am careful not to categorise this sort of input as "testing" but, rather, as "impressions". They really are just some thoughts based on growing experience of the camera.

What I am slowly but surely realising is that the move to the D800 was not a simple "upgrade".

When I moved from a D80 to a D300 or from a D300 to a D3s, those were upgrades. Each step in the procession offered a bit of an improvement on the step before - either in terms of image quality or in ease of taking photographs, especially in more "difficult" conditions. But they were steps with more similarities than differences at each stage.

Some aspects of moving on to the D800 might be seen as just further steps in the progression but, in other respects, it represents a sea-change. Particularly in terms of how one thinks about photography.

I think the main leap forward is in terms of the sheer amount of data that is collected each time the shutter is released. It is really only when one comes to terms with the enormous possibilities that this presents that the real potential of the camera can be appreciated. In my case that has taken 5 months to really hit home. But once it is taken on board, it demands (or at least invites) a quite different approach to photography.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
25 Aug 2012 9:55AM
...and, just to add to that last point, I am now going back to Raw files I took in the first few weeks of owning the D800 and looking at them againn, from a perspective that has developed hugely in terms of the possibilities all that data offers.

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