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Noise because Of High Iso


arhab 3 43 2 Indonesia
25 Feb 2012 7:14AM
Hi all. I shoot image with my phone camera (Samsung GT C233), and looks great on my phone display, but when i see it on monitor, it's terrible. I took it at night in the room with light from lamp. The exif data show the iso is 400. Is this called "noise" because of high iso? when i shoot image at noon, the image looks clear and the exif data show the image is 50. foto-0092a.jpg

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Boyd 11 11.2k 11 Wales
25 Feb 2012 7:31AM
Yes, that sums it up pretty well - noise .
monkeygrip 6 574 6 England
25 Feb 2012 8:19AM
What you have to remember is that mobile phones are built with the cheapest materials by the cheapest manufacturers.

Expecting a quality image from a poor sensor and through a bit of plastic that is shoved in and out of your pocket and wiped clear with a greasy finger is not going to happen.

The brilliant thing they do and this is the genius behind these phones is that the screen technology actually makes the image look ok just after taking the shot, on closer inspection as found above you realise the quality of all phone images is rubbish.
25 Feb 2012 9:45AM
Rubbish?

Might be worth checking this before condemning all camera phones as rubbish!
User_Removed 11 17.9k 8 Norway
25 Feb 2012 10:26AM

Quote:the quality of all phone images is rubbish.


THAT is a very sweeping statement IMO... and quite incorrect. This was taken on a (by today's standards) very 'old technology' Nokia N73.

Hardly 'Rubbish'!
JJGEE 10 6.5k 18 England
25 Feb 2012 10:50AM

Quote:Hardly 'Rubbish'!

Agree with that.... I have Zeiss lenses for my A900 Wink
sherlob Plus
9 2.6k 126 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2012 10:54AM
I suspect noise is likely to be an issue on many mobile phone cameras when you push the ISO to 400 - the sensor size is tiny and given the large number of pixels cramed onto it you'll find that on many (if not most) phones the degree of electronic amplification needed will generate a mass of image noise. There isn't anything you can really do about this - although if your phone has a flash you could try using this to reduce the ISO used (my phone uses an led flash and i don't rate it at all).

For me the best solution was to buy and carry a compact camera with me - I'm a stickler for image quality and I wanted far more control than my phone could give me - this solution helped address these issues.

Adam
ianrobinson 5 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2012 12:34PM
no disrespect but that image has been photo shopped to death to get that looking like that, try blowing it up, chances are it will be pixalated horribly.
i have a samsung galexy s11 with an 8 meg camera and it is rubbish, ok for small images but go in to 100% crop and see the pixalation.
Phone cameras are rubbish if you want to produce a quality image that can be printed to a3 or more and most won't print to a4 before producing pixalation.
8 meg crammed on a sensor the size of a button hole does not work end of.....
ianrobinson 5 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2012 12:38PM
give me a dslr any day, i love the quality only dslrs give.
i have an oly pen ep3 and still that does not give the quality that my 2 dslrs give.

Only by sticking superb lenses on a camera are you going to get the results your after and that probably goes for the phones too, but even if you do get great images from a phone you won't get to blow them up to a decent size.
monkeygrip 6 574 6 England
25 Feb 2012 2:18PM
The comparisons posted above just show that even rubbish phone technology has improved a little and I can conclusively prove because I used to design and sell them that the sensor the analogue to digital converters and the D to A converters are just not up to the job or your phone would cost 2000 and there wouldn't be 30 million cameras sold every year.

Remember I didn't say you couldn't take an interesting shot with a phone I said the quality of it will be rubbish and will be for many more years to come yet.

The car shot on the Nokia has almost certainly had a Nik soft, glamour glow filter added or something similar and would look like a 3 year old had drawn it with a crayon if you print bigger than 6x4.
User_Removed 11 17.9k 8 Norway
25 Feb 2012 2:24PM

Quote:The car shot on the Nokia has almost certainly had a Nik soft, glamour glow filter added or something similar and would look like a 3 year old had drawn it with a crayon if you print bigger than 6x4.


Really!?

You have lots to learn...

Wink
monkeygrip 6 574 6 England
25 Feb 2012 3:21PM

Quote:

Really!?

You have lots to learn...

Wink



Thats true I do, but not about the electronics bit lol.Smile
Jestertheclown 6 6.9k 246 England
25 Feb 2012 4:10PM

Quote:the quality of all phone images is rubbish.

Of course they're not.
In the right hands they can produce perfectly acceptable images.


Quote:Phone cameras are rubbish if you want to produce a quality image that can be printed to a3 or more and most won't print to a4 before producing pixalation.

Not the case either, I'm afraid.
I've printed A4 images from an Iphone which started life intended to be no more than holiday snaps and they were also perfectly adequate, showing no signs of pixelation.
As for printing at A3 or more, would anyone expect their camera's phone to produce images of that size?

What's being said here is not that phone cameras are a match for DSLRs as Ian's suggesting, it is that phone cameras, in their own right, are perfectly capable of taking decent images which the majority of people would be happy with.
monkeygrip 6 574 6 England
25 Feb 2012 9:29PM
I love the fact that mobile phone images are classed as acceptable by some people it makes my shots look ace.

My comments are not based on preference or loyalty to the dslr or even the bespoke compact/bridge camera they are based on the understanding of Electronic first principles.

We live in an anologue world "waves". We see and hear information in the form of a wave if you have to take a wave and turn into zeros and ones (digital info) then no matter how good the electronics are they can never re-produce that original wave again full stop.

To enable your electronic device to see, sample and convert your wave into digital data it needs to be amplified more pixels on a same sized sensor equals smaller pixels and in turn needs more amplification causing distortion or as the wonderful world of photography calls it "Noise"

Megapixels sell phones and cameras to morons and the un-informed any, and I mean any electronics engineer will tell you the smaller anologue signals get i.e the smaller the components get the more amplification it needs.
To be able to control this problem is the holy grail of any electronics engineer including the camera manufacturer and it costs a lot of money something that is wasted on a mobile phone because no matter what lens you strap onto it the results will be awful just because of the physical size of a phone and the real estate needed to have the silicon to be able to and I know this is an outlandish comment for a phone "Make phone calls"

As a photographer you can use any recordable media or material to capture images expressing style, composition and a creative eye wether it be phone, camera, or bloody stone rubbing but dont try and shovel the corporate advertising sh*t that phones can produce quality images because it is just not true not my opinion just the untested and questionable laws of physics.
Jestertheclown 6 6.9k 246 England
25 Feb 2012 9:43PM
Pardon?

Perhaps I'm old fashioned but I decide whether an image is acceptable, or pleasant to look at by doing just that;looking at it. If I can't see anything obviously wrong with it, then I'm happy with it.
My method has absolutely nothing to do with the laws of physics. But it works.

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