Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Over Manipulation of Images?


JohnParminter 8 1.3k 14 England
22 Oct 2012 6:59PM

Quote: If it's stated clearly in the rules what is and isn't allowed there's no arguing at the end.


I've read their rules Pete and to me they are very clear what is acceptable and what isn't however, that will be no guarantee that folk don't submit very clever photoshopped images.


Quote:The thing is how are they going to tell?


Firstly they have stated they don't want over-manipulated images, this is slightly different to photoshopped fake nature images. I would have thought it easy for their judges to determine what is over-manipulated and unreal for their tastes and criteria.

They may indeed find it a little harder to tell a fake nature image, a clever photoshopped Bengal tiger in unusual but compelling surrounds for example. They would have to use their judgement and err on the side of caution and ask to inspect RAW data for winning entries perhaps for verification.

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

monstersnowman 10 1.7k 1 England
22 Oct 2012 8:10PM
What if you don't shoot in raw ? I know many do but some people do shoot in jpg and I do occasionally.
snapbandit 11 2.2k 3 Northern Ireland
22 Oct 2012 8:32PM

Quote:What if you don't shoot in raw ? I know many do but some people do shoot in jpg and I do occasionally.


Well in the article they stated
" In case of the winners, we will ask for the RAW files, if available, to be submitted for review."
(bold added by me), so if raw not available they might just want the 'original' jpeg

Joe B
Dave_Canon 9 1.0k United Kingdom
22 Oct 2012 10:38PM
This is nothing new. For camera Clubs, National competitions and international competitions sponsored by the main international organisations FIAP (the world except N America) and PSA (N America) have always placed limitations on a few subjects (natural History, documentary and some Travel competitions). In fact I think the requirements are more stringent than the National Geographic. However, for the vast majority of photographs entered (pictorial and other topics), there are no restrictions other than it all your own work.

I have taken photographs of tame owls which can create amazing photographs but would not dream of entering them under anything but pictorial. I can certainly understand why a genuine natural history photographer who has spent weeks tracking down a particular bird/animal/plant would not wish to compete with someone who had it all set up for them or heavily manipulated images to create the final photograph. I do use light to heavy manipulation and probably more of the latter but then I am not a natural History photographer.

Dave
mattw 11 5.2k 10 United Kingdom
23 Oct 2012 1:23AM
While the NG guidelines seem badly written (from a photographic perspective), I don't see any real problem with them.

Their guidelines are similar (in sprit) to the Take A View competition.

It's always a question of 'how much is too much' when it comes to manipulation
Nick_w Plus
8 4.2k 99 England
23 Oct 2012 7:18AM

Quote:Their guidelines are similar (in sprit) to the Take A View competition.

It's always a question of 'how much is too much' when it comes to manipulation



Seems very subjective, if they haven't defined what is too much I can see a lot of problems ahead for NG.
keithh Plus
11 24.0k 33 Wallis And Futuna
23 Oct 2012 8:15AM
I see they will allow B&W images which in the digital world are often the most digitally manipulated of them all and very surprised that they will not allow stiched panoramas.

and once again HDR is seen as the pariah of photography whilst dodging and burning is seen as some kind of acceptable mouse clicking skill.
Nick_w Plus
8 4.2k 99 England
23 Oct 2012 8:20AM

Quote:I see they will allow B&W images which in the digital world are often the most digitally manipulated of them all and very surprised that they will not allow stiched panoramas.

and once again HDR is seen as the pariah of photography whilst dodging and burning is seen as some kind of acceptable mouse clicking skill.



But dodging and burning and black and white is seen as old school Keith, so of course there's a difference ..... With the old farts


But seriously why no stitched Panos? Or are they only wanting submissions from those with a medium format backs, 5Dmk3 or D800's?
keithh Plus
11 24.0k 33 Wallis And Futuna
23 Oct 2012 8:42AM
Neither do they want the world above water distorting with a fish eye yet seem happy for it to be altered by a lens baby.
Nick_w Plus
8 4.2k 99 England
23 Oct 2012 8:47AM
But the Lens baby reminds them of their 1923 Leica lens, they bought with their first pay packet
23 Oct 2012 9:32AM
Simple situation, National Geographic is a magazine reporting odds and ends from around the world, the images must be a statement of fact - a record. There is a place for manipulation, in art galleries, forums such as ephotozine, but not in a news report.
Weird about fisheyes and stitched panos though, what goes on there? Boring old fart.

Tim
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
23 Oct 2012 10:30AM

Quote:It's the whole 'is photography art?' question all over again.

.



No it's not.

It is a statement of the type of photographs they want.

For some purposes (and some competitions) the objective is to obtain images that are as clear and accurate representations of reality as possible.

For other purposes (and some competitions) there may be an interest in using photography as a basis for creative art.

Any magazine or competition organiser is entitled to set the parameters they wish submissions to adhere to.

There is a lot of confusion in this thread between "image manipulation" and "post-exposure processing", maybe because the terms themselves are not well-defined or consistently applied.

As has been said, every Raw file does require some level of processing. Some may require more than others in order to get close to the original. The National Geographic criteria do not preclude this.

Image manipulation, on the other hand, can involve cloning out some elements of the picture, adding new elements, substituting skies, etc., etc. That, it seems to me, is what the National Geographic is precluding.

Some competitions are more rigorous than others. For the RPS Nature Group exhibition, for example, even giving a photograph what is described as a "cute title" will lead to disqualification. If you choose to enter, you stick by the rules.
keithh Plus
11 24.0k 33 Wallis And Futuna
23 Oct 2012 10:38AM
I guess though, that by excluding HDR they also exclude blended exposures, whether done 'by hand' or by auto software and yet these do not alter the scene in anyway. They are merely a way of capturing a moment without the use of filters.
23 Oct 2012 10:45AM
To me, there is simple manipulation ie shadow/contrast/light/brightness. Which you get in most simple photographic programs . Then there is the more complex, ie photoshop, GIMP, well, the list goes on. I think simple manipulation is ok in most cases. The others have have their place as some wonderful images can be created in the more complex programs. I do feel that it should be stated that manipulation has been used and then it can be viewed in its own category.
keithh Plus
11 24.0k 33 Wallis And Futuna
23 Oct 2012 11:02AM
The problem is that once you start defining what can and can't be done then you have to be more specific than the rules outlined.

Will focus stacked macro's be allowed for instance?

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.