Parliament Looking at Photographer's Rights in Public Places


DunDiggin 13 64 2 United Kingdom
13 Mar 2008 4:56PM
Apologies if someone already started a thread on this - couldn't find it. It bears repeating anyway!

Austin Mitchell MP has put forward an Early Day Motion for other MPs to sign up to, seeking clear information of photographers rights to be circulated.

Please consider contacting your MP and asking them to sign it. You can find and contact your MP by entering your postcode at:
www.theyworkforyou.com
and following the links.

EDM 1155 : PHOTOGRAPHY IN PUBLIC AREAS
11.03.2008

Quote:That this House is concerned to encourage the spread and enjoyment of photography as the most genuine and accessible people's art; deplores the apparent increase in the number of reported incidents in which the police, police community support officers (PCSOs) or wardens attempt to stop street photography and order the deletion of photographs or the confiscation of cards, cameras or film on various specious ground such as claims that some public buildings are strategic or sensitive, that children and adults can only be photographed with their written permission, that photographs of police and PCSOs are illegal, or that photographs may be used by terrorists; points out that photography in public places and streets is not only enjoyable but perfectly legal; regrets all such efforts to stop, discourage or inhibit amateur photographers taking pictures in public places, many of which are in any case festooned with closed circuit television cameras; and urges the Home Office and the Association of Chief Police Officers to agree on a photography code for the information of officers on the ground, setting out the public's right to photograph public places thus allowing photographers to enjoy their hobby without officious interference or unjustified suspicion.

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RichardB 15 328 United Kingdom
13 Mar 2008 5:02PM
The metropolitan police are advertising urging people should report others who are taking photographs !!!
Click on the first poster !
counter terrorism campaign [link=null][/link]
chris.maddock 19 3.7k United Kingdom
13 Mar 2008 5:08PM

Quote:
Austin Mitchell MP has put forward an Early Day Motion for other MPs to sign up to, seeking clear information of photographers rights to be circulated.



That's all well and good, provided he doesn't reinvent the idea that was mooted a while back to have photographer's ID cards - conveniently to be administered by the RPS, more money for their coffers Sad
MikeRC 15 3.6k United Kingdom
13 Mar 2008 5:13PM
Terrorists have also been known to use motorcars.

...If you see anyone who could be a terrorist in charge of a motor vehicle......

....Mike
chris.maddock 19 3.7k United Kingdom
13 Mar 2008 5:14PM
Double their Vehicle Excise Duty Wink
stuwhitt 16 1.4k United Kingdom
13 Mar 2008 5:17PM
The photographers id cards idea came from the guy who started the petition as opposed to the government caused all sorts of confusion
RichardB 15 328 United Kingdom
13 Mar 2008 5:34PM

Quote:Double their Vehicle Excise Duty


They already have - they won't be using a Jeep Cherokee again !
Danny_Peters 13 159 England
13 Mar 2008 7:11PM
Nice one. Consider my MP written to.
stolzy 14 3.8k 7
13 Mar 2008 7:52PM
Nice one Austin. But lets take note of the many on this forum who have argued for a restriction of photographers rights
stolzy 14 3.8k 7
13 Mar 2008 8:15PM
Unfortunatly whenever there are threads here about photographing people without permission, or kids at football matches and many other circumstances, there are only too many people ready to give our rights away piecemeal.
stolzy 14 3.8k 7
13 Mar 2008 8:28PM
Don't say it - even in jest Smile
elowes 16 2.8k United Kingdom
13 Mar 2008 9:30PM
The biggest worry is that government might like the idea. Considering how much they have messed up would you want them to legislate or agree a code that restricts all photographers.

I would rather see a few incidents of over zealous behaviour (which is all it is if you consider the number of photographers) than have my activities proscribed by any more laws or 'guidelines'.
Louise_Foto 13 46
13 Mar 2008 9:46PM
seems the mp is just saying its time to remind the authorities that photographers have rights which need to be respected, i agree
digitalpic 17 107 4 Scotland
14 Mar 2008 8:27AM
The Met already have a set of "guidelines" for when dealing with the press and media, it would seem like common sense to ask the police to adjust a set of guidelines in respect of "public" and advise the guys on the ground what to do?

Guidelines for Metropolitan Police Service staff on dealing with media reporters, press photographers and television crews

Members of the media are not only members of the public; they can influence
the way the Metropolitan Police Service is portrayed. It is important that
we build good relationships with them, even when the circumstances are
difficult. They have a duty to report many of those things that we have to
deal with - crime, demonstrations, accidents, major events and incidents.

This guide is designed to help you take the appropriate action when you have
to deal with members of the media.

1. Members of the media have a duty to report from the scene of many of the
incidents we have to deal with. We should actively help them carry out their
responsibilities provided they do not interfere with ours.
2. Where it is necessary to put cordons in place, it is much better to
provide the media with a good vantage point from which they can operate
rather than to exclude them, otherwise they may try to get around the
cordons and interfere with police operations. Providing an area for members
of the media does not exclude them from operating from other areas to which
the general public have access.
3. Members of the media have a duty to take photographs and film incidents
and we have no legal power or moral responsibility to prevent or restrict
what they record. It is a matter for their editors to control what is
published or broadcast, not the police. Once images are recorded, we have no
power to delete or confiscate them without a court order, even if we think
they contain damaging or useful evidence.
4. If someone who is distressed or bereaved asks for police to intervene to
prevent members of the media filming or photographing them, we may pass on
their request but we have no power to prevent or restrict media activity. If
they are trespassing on private property, the person who owns or controls
the premises may eject them and may ask for your help in preventing a breach
of the peace while they do so. The media have their own rules of conduct and
complaints procedures if members of the public object.
5. To help you identify genuine members of the media, they carry
identification, which they will produce to you on request. An example of the
UK Press Card is shown [on the paper guidelines].
6. Members of the media do not need a permit to photograph or film in public
places.
7. To enter private property while accompanying police, the media must
obtain permission, which must be recorded, from the person who owns or is in
control the premises. We cannot give or deny permission to members of the
media to enter private premises whether the premises are directly involved
in the police operation or not. This is a matter between the person who owns
or is in control the premises and the members of the media.
8. Giving members of the media access to incident scenes is a matter for the
Senior Investigating Officer. The gathering of evidence and forensic
retrieval make access unlikely in the early stages and this should be
explained to members of the media. Requests for access should be passed to
the Senior Investigating Officer who should allow access in appropriate
cases as soon as practicable.
9. Advice and assistance in dealing with members of the media is available
24 hours a day via the Press Bureau at New Scotland Yard.
Burgy_Tog 16 634 United Kingdom
14 Mar 2008 9:20AM

Quote:The Met already have a set of "guidelines" for when dealing with the press and media, it would seem like common sense to ask the police to adjust a set of guidelines in respect of "public" and advise the guys on the ground what to do?


It s not just the Met Police, ACPO agreed that the guidelines should be rolled out nation wide.

I agree that the old bill need reminding what they can and cannot do legally when it comes to photographers and photographs.

Also some members of the public need reminding that the use of a camera does not make one a paedophile or a terrorist. Some of them also need reminding that there is no privacy law in the UK, and that you have no right to privacy in public.

To be honest you have no right to privacy in your own home or garden either, if I want to photograph someone in their back garden from a public place I can, the only time that an offence occurs is if the image is subsequently published, even then it is a civil offence.

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