GB Sports Photographer & The Panasonic LUMIX S1

Photographers & Trespass


justin c 15 5.0k 36 England
12 May 2019 9:35PM

Quote:I think that you will find that the majority of the trespassers were Joe Public.


I realise that, the CLOTHES easily distinguish the two apart.

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rhody 17 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
13 May 2019 6:44AM

Quote:
Quote:If you are having a dig at railway photographers (anoraks & notebooks) [yes I saw the tongue smilies], I think that you will find that the majority of the trespassers were Joe Public.


It's not just the train spotters that are frequently found on private land. I believe the bus depots have a similar problem from time to time Tongue]



That bus depot clip is so very funny - Thank you. Grin
justin c 15 5.0k 36 England
13 May 2019 8:08AM
LOL Grin
thewilliam2 2 1.3k
13 May 2019 9:24AM
Shouldn't we spare a thought for the driver, who might have to live with the guilt of having killed or injure some idiot who trespasses on the railway line. A "suicide by train" must prove very traumatic for the driver who can do nothing to avoid the collision.
bluesandtwos 9 405 1 England
13 May 2019 9:29AM

Quote:Shouldn't we spare a thought for the driver, who might have to live with the guilt of having killed or injure some idiot who trespasses on the railway line. A "suicide by train" must prove very traumatic for the driver who can do nothing to avoid the collision.


And the services that have to clear up the mess, it's not very nice.
rhody 17 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
13 May 2019 9:45AM

Quote:Shouldn't we spare a thought for the driver, who might have to live with the guilt of having killed or injure some idiot who trespasses on the railway line. A "suicide by train" must prove very traumatic for the driver who can do nothing to avoid the collision.


One of the train drivers is quoted as saying in the article that there were people every 200 yards track side, all waiting to take photos.
The implication being, the driver found it very stressful as he had no idea if they were planning to step in front of his train or not.
Monumental stupidity from the selfish photographers in question.
Chris_L 5 5.2k United Kingdom
18 May 2019 9:39AM
This always happens.

You only need a couple of photographers to stand on the wrong side of a fence before others copy. Justifying it to themselves "well everybody else was".

When a few rail photographers and trainspotters have congregated it starts to look like an event, this will encourage curious passers-by. Just a matter of time before the kids are on picnic blankets!

The part of the line might not have any prominent signage about trespassing offences. Any injured people ignorant of the law would probably try to sue Railtrack for not keeping all fences and barriers in 100% secure condition.

Companies can't defend a lawsuit because people were not using their common sense - hence packets of nuts that say: "warning may contain nuts".

The whole things is a mess, someone will die one day.

I wonder if Railtrack have looked into the cost of providing proper viewing platforms and viewing areas for rail photographers and trainspotters. It might save lives, might be cheaper than the costs of delayed services, damage to fences, death and injuries on the lines etc

What other alternatives are there?
Railcam 13 771 2 Scotland
18 May 2019 10:07AM
Just for the sake of accuracy - Railtrack ceased to exist in 2002. Since then, Network Rail has been (and still is) responsible for the UK railway infrastructure and it is a non-profit arm of the Department of Transport.

I was brought up in the days of "Common Sense" when I was responsible for my own well being. Nowadays, if you get hurt and it is your own fault, you sue the property owner and the courts are daft enough to find in your favour and award you "compo". As you say Chris - it is a mess.

As for dedicated viewing points I try to avoid crowds so that I do not get the same shot as everyone else.



thewilliam2 2 1.3k
18 May 2019 10:41AM

Quote:

The part of the line might not have any prominent signage about trespassing offences. Any injured people ignorant of the law would probably try to sue Railtrack for not keeping all fences and barriers in 100% secure condition.

Companies can't defend a lawsuit because people were not using their common sense - hence packets of nuts that say: "warning may contain nuts".

The whole things is a mess, someone will die one day.



English law does have a concept of "contributory negligence" which allows a court to award greatly reduced damages. The nut warning is for the US market where the law doesn't recognise contributory negligence.
Chris_L 5 5.2k United Kingdom
18 May 2019 2:29PM
Oops re-Railtrack, now Network Rail,

The nut warning appears on goods in the UK market. Lidl even recalled packets of nuts without the warning https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/lidl-recalls-peanuts-because-labels-fail-to-warn-packets-may-contain-nuts-a3308631.html as well as tins of fish that didn't warn UK consumers that there was fish in the tins https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/lidl-recalls-tinned-fish-because-labels-fail-to-warn-cans-may-contain-fish-a3237566.html

It's a shame if the train is cancelled due to problem with sightseers, other solutions need to be found instead of ensuring there is nothing interesting to see any more
thewilliam2 2 1.3k
18 May 2019 4:44PM
My favourite warning was on the rear-view mirror of a Harley Davidson bike "Caution: objects seen in this mirror are behind you".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contributory_negligence

The warning notice does seem to increase the effectiveness of the contributory negligence defence.

Did anybody see the obituary to common sense?

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/obituary-common-sense-london-times-joachim-waibel
Chris_L 5 5.2k United Kingdom
18 May 2019 10:31PM
How much of that is true though? The coffee thing is an oft misused example: "Common Sense finally gave up the will to live, after a woman failed to realize that a steaming cup of coffee was hot. She spilled a little in her lap, and was promptly awarded a huge settlement."

Not true, the facts are:

Stella Liebeck was a 79-year-old woman in Albuquerque, New Mexico, whose grandson drove her to McDonald’s in 1992. She was in a parked car when the coffee spilled.

Liebeck acknowledged that the spill was her fault. What she took issue with was that the coffee was so ridiculously hot — at up to 190 degrees Fahrenheit, near boiling point — that it caused third-degree burns on her legs and genitals, nearly killing her and requiring extensive surgery to treat.

McDonald’s apparently knew that this was unsafe. In the decade before Liebeck’s spill, McDonald’s had received 700 reports of people burning themselves. McDonald’s admitted that its coffee was a hazard at such high temperatures. But it continued the practice, enforced by official McDonald’s policy, of heating up its coffee to near-boiling point. (McDonald’s claimed customers wanted the coffee this hot.)

Liebeck didn’t want to go to court. She just wanted McDonald’s to pay her medical expenses, estimated at $20,000. McDonald’s only offered $800, leading her to file a lawsuit in 1994.

After hearing the evidence, the jury concluded that McDonald’s handling of its coffee was so irresponsible that Liebeck should get much more than $20,000, suggesting she get nearly $2.9 million to send the company a message. Liebeck settled for less than $600,000. And McDonald’s began changing how it heats up its coffee.

There are photos of Liebeck's burns, not for the faint-hearted here

Deiqkier 9 41 United Kingdom
19 May 2019 2:51PM
I can't understand why they feel the need to be so close to the loco, they are such big beasts. The best train shots, IMHO, are side on charging through the countryside, fire, smoke and steam. I don't know the route, but most lines have small, little used stations that are ideal photo platforms. I bet they were all male- is it a macho thing to get so close to the beast for the sake off a few photos.
Colin


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