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Photographing the eclipse on Friday.


cheddar-caveman 17 1.2k England
17 Mar 2015 7:43PM
I would like to try and get some pictures of this rare event and am seeking advice.I have read several methods on the net, one suggesting that a 10 stop ND filter should be used. This doesn't seem n]much light reduction to me as I have just put my 2 stop, 4 stop and eight stop ND's together and I can still see the TV quite clearly through them so surely the sun would be far too bright?
Ant help will be appreciated.
cheddar-caveman 17 1.2k England
17 Mar 2015 7:59PM
I think I've just answered my own question - I'm buying a welders glass, 4" X 3.5" and will tape it onto the front of my lens! Job done!
Any better suggestions please?
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
17 Mar 2015 8:01PM
10 stops equates to reducing the light by a factor of 1000, which, I believe, is not considered enough. On the other hand the sun won't be very high in the sky, and probably at least partly obscured by clouds. If you avoid using the ovf, the worst you can do is damage your camera.
cheddar-caveman 17 1.2k England
17 Mar 2015 8:06PM
Thanks for that, but that is NOT an option themak! I believe one needs to reduce the light factor by something like 100,000, about 1000 stops so I'll stick with the welding glass me thinks!
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
17 Mar 2015 8:17PM
Safety first sensible, of course. 'Only' 17 stops to get 100,000 reduction factor by my maths, but I'd get that confirmed!
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
17 Mar 2015 8:19PM
Of course you need to factor in the lens magnification.
cheddar-caveman 17 1.2k England
17 Mar 2015 8:27PM
My intention is to use my 300mm f2.8 with 2X extender.
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
17 Mar 2015 8:41PM
21 stops by my fag packet. I'd stick to welding glass if you can get a piece big enough for that lens, although I doubt if the results will be up to much. Not very refined stuff.
cheddar-caveman 17 1.2k England
17 Mar 2015 8:44PM
Agree the welding glass is pretty low tech but leo low price! Any other suggestions then? I don't want to spend too much on a one off exercise!
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
17 Mar 2015 8:54PM
If the maths checks out, I could only suggest stacking ND filters to get the required number - could be expensive for that lens. Bummer if it's cloudy on the day.
cheddar-caveman 17 1.2k England
17 Mar 2015 8:56PM
The only ND's I've got that I can use on my 300mm f4 are 2X 4X and 8X so not enough there and I'm not buying more just for this project! I've only used them once in the couple of years I've had them!
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
17 Mar 2015 9:18PM
I wouldn't want to encourage you to take risks with your sensor, but manually setting the aperture to f16 or so gets you a few more stops light reduction. Safe way is the welders glass, but probably unsatisfactory. I doubt if the cameras metering will be able to cope, so probably guesswork / trial and error needed for exposure times. I'm sure we've all had the sun in the frame fairly frequently in our time, just not usually straight at it with a long lens.
cheddar-caveman 17 1.2k England
17 Mar 2015 9:26PM
I can get down to f32 on both these lenses. Not knowing much about how one calculates this sort of thing, where does that take it with the three ND filters I've got - 2, 4 & 8? I presume one adds the filters making a total of 14 so probably still well below a safety factor?
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
17 Mar 2015 9:50PM
3 stops, I guess. I don't know where your figure of 100,000 comes from but if it's 'official', probably assumes strong midsummer sunshine and includes a big safety factor for risks to eyesight. Using live-view takes out the eyesight risk - I don't think camera sensors are so sensitive or valuable.
On the other hand, I haven't seen very interesting pictures of partial eclipses - not in the same league as a total.
17 Mar 2015 10:01PM

Quote:I can get down to f32 on both these lenses. Not knowing much about how one calculates this sort of thing, where does that take it with the three ND filters I've got - 2, 4 & 8? I presume one adds the filters making a total of 14 so probably still well below a safety factor?


Rethink your decision-while it is not too late. First of all- you are at great risk of loosing your camera and seriosly damaging your eyesight. No photographic filter, ND included, cuts off infrared component of solar radiation. Being concentrated by a lens on a camera sensor or your eye retina it will burn a hole in it- absolutely painlessly in the eye case. This is no joke, do hour homework and read on the Internet about safely observing the sun.

You still have a day or two to make it safe. Visit the closest astronomy shop and talk to the guys about what you need to do it safely. Alternatively yes, you can use arc welding filter #11 or denser exclusively in live view mode and some cloth over your head and camera to avoid prolonged look in the Sun direction (or flip the screen if you can). Quality of images with welding filter won't be great though.

Cheers!

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