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Pinhole Photography


plp 4 United States
8 Aug 2012 11:27PM
I just made myself a pinhole camera from cardboard box 4x5 35mm as an experiment to see how the photos come out. Right now I am using Kodak Professional B&W ISO 100 Negative film.

What are some slower film speed that I could try to experiment with besides 35mm/ISO 100?
I ask because I'm thinking of making a three or multiple pinhole camera.

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KenTaylor Plus
12 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
9 Aug 2012 9:07AM
100 iso is about as slow as you will be able to obtain freely apart from Ilford Pan F plus which is 50 iso.

It hardly matters with pinhole photography what the film speed is unless you are deadly serious with precision pinhole cameras.

Much of the fun in pinhole photography is being able to use any old film where B&W is the easy option in that you can process it yourself.
keith selmes 13 7.2k 1 United Kingdom
9 Aug 2012 9:08AM
Adox CHS 25 and CHS 50, possibly Efke PL 25 and PL 50

I'm unsure what format you are using as you say 4x5 35mm, but here are links where both 4x5 sheet film and 35mm cans are available

In the UK from http://www.ag-photographic.co.uk/adox-film-11-c.asp

In the US perhaps from http://www.digitaltruth.com/store/cart/4-x-5-Sheet-Film/

or 35mm http://www.digitaltruth.com/store/cart/35mm-Film/
thewilliam 8 6.1k
9 Aug 2012 10:04AM
You could even save money by using photographic enlarging paper and then scan the developed pic.
if you want to slow it down, you could always use a ND filter with it possibly but other than that, I agree with Ken with using "any old film"
JuBarney Plus
6 25 3 United Kingdom
27 Mar 2017 9:18PM
PINHOLE IMAGES

Tried making a pinhole lens to go in front of my other lens today but whatever setting I put on my Olympus I could not make it fire outside in good light.

Can anyone please suggest settings for me, and whether on Macro or Aperture Priority? I need an image for a competition with entries in by Wed.!

Cheers
Ju
StrayCat Plus
13 18.4k 3 Canada
27 Mar 2017 9:33PM
You're obviously not getting enough light for it to focus in auto. There should be a setting in the menu system that allows you to fire the shutter no matter if the shot is in focus or not. You may have to set it to that for what you're trying to do.
JuBarney Plus
6 25 3 United Kingdom
27 Mar 2017 9:50PM
Many many thanks for the suggestion; I will hunt through the menu and try again tomorrow.
Ju
27 Mar 2017 11:45PM
I have a Holga pinhole that fits my Nikons in place of the lens.

The easiest way to get correct exposure is to use the camera on the A (for award-winner) mode. We need to close the eyepiece blind or cover the viewfinder eyepiece because light that enters this way is enough to fool the meter and give the wrong exposure.
Deiqkier 6 17 United Kingdom
28 Mar 2017 1:47PM
JuBarney, did you put the pinhole in front of the lens, or have I misunderstood the comment. The pinhole should replace the glass lens- using a body cap is an option if you have one. As there is no aperture to control you would need to go manual setting the speed by trial and error. Having said that, must admit I haven't tried it myself. Colin
keith selmes 13 7.2k 1 United Kingdom
28 Mar 2017 4:21PM
I don't know the camera, but on my Canon 5D I believe I could use A on the command dial. I would normally think of using M for manual (or Macho or Masochist ?). Also I tend to experiment with repeat attempts and adjustments, as I can't see the subject very well in the viewfinder, and taking more digital frames doesn't cost extra. I try harder when using film!
Sooty_1 7 1.5k 221 United Kingdom
28 Mar 2017 11:20PM
The easiest way with digital is to use manual and set the shutter speed to "B". Guess the exposure and adjust from there. In daylight a small pinhole will probably give a time of a few seconds. Chimp and adjust.

You could go down the route of measuring the effective aperture and calculating exposure, but trial and error is easiest and quickest.

With film, measuring the pinhole and finding the effective aperture will give you a starting point, but in all likelihood you will need to correct for reciprocity failure as well if your exposure runs to seconds or even minutes. The exposure latitude inherent in negative film will help.

Nick

JuBarney Plus
6 25 3 United Kingdom
29 Mar 2017 9:28PM

Quote:JuBarney, did you put the pinhole in front of the lens, or have I misunderstood the comment. The pinhole should replace the glass lens- using a body cap is an option if you have one. As there is no aperture to control you would need to go manual setting the speed by trial and error. Having said that, must admit I haven't tried it myself. Colin


Thanks for your reply Colin. Yes I used an old lens cap and put a tiny hole in it and then held it up in front of my Macro lens. (Silly me hadn't registered that an aperture was irrelevant!) I will try out the manual settings for some experience, but too late for the competition this weekend.

Many thanks, Ju

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