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Portraiture Photography


nicollehuxley New Member 7
14 Jul 2020 2:34PM
In your professional opinions what are the inherent professional standards (behaviour, skills, attributes and qualities) of portraiture photography and the theme of identity?

Thank you for any feedback.

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Carabosse 17 41.4k 270 England
14 Jul 2020 4:32PM
Get them to say "cheese" and you yourself say "watch the birdie" if their attention wanders.

Works for me.Tongue

Welcome to EPZ!Smile
clicknimagine Plus
10 660 101 India
14 Jul 2020 4:43PM
i am not professional and i don't know your skill level, but it is all about light, you have to acquire skill in studio light set up first, or you can utilize natural light at the best possible way, you have to do a lot of post processing as per your taste, you can also use props, make ups, hair styles, dresses, best models...there are so many things...mind you the primary element is light...
14 Jul 2020 4:49PM

Quote:what are the inherent professional standards (behaviour, skills, attributes and qualities) of portraiture photography and the theme of identity


Sounds rather like an exam question to me!
nicollehuxley New Member 7
14 Jul 2020 5:42PM

Quote:
Quote:what are the inherent professional standards (behaviour, skills, attributes and qualities) of portraiture photography and the theme of identity


Sounds rather like an exam question to me!



Itís a research task where I need to gather opinions on my specialised practice (portraiture) from peers and tutors regarding the professional standards in this field and use as evidence in my journal.
nicollehuxley New Member 7
14 Jul 2020 5:43PM

Quote:Get them to say "cheese" and you yourself say "watch the birdie" if their attention wanders.

Works for me.Tongue

Welcome to EPZ!Smile



Thankyou for your help
nicollehuxley New Member 7
14 Jul 2020 5:46PM

Quote:i am not professional and i don't know your skill level, but it is all about light, you have to acquire skill in studio light set up first, or you can utilize natural light at the best possible way, you have to do a lot of post processing as per your taste, you can also use props, make ups, hair styles, dresses, best models...there are so many things...mind you the primary element is light...


This is extremely helpful Thankyou for your opinion
Philh04 Plus
14 2.2k United Kingdom
15 Jul 2020 7:37AM

Quote:In your professional opinions what are the inherent professional standards (behaviour, skills, attributes and qualities) of portraiture photography and the theme of identity?

Thank you for any feedback.


There is no indication of where you are... Have you thought about contacting a professional body or looking at their web sites, there are several in the UK, the IIP, MPA and the Societies.
mrswoolybill Plus
13 2.2k 2247 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2020 8:06AM
Somnath has emphasised light, the need to understand it and work with it. I will add:
I am not a professional but normally I spend a lot of my time photographing people as a volunteer. I would say that, apart from the obvious technical skills required, it's actually important to like people or at least to be interested in them, to be willing to engage with them. Establishing a rapport quickly with strangers requires self-confidence, and communication skills. The subject needs to trust the camera and not see it as a threat.
JackAllTog Plus
11 6.1k 58 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2020 9:22AM
Hi Nicolle,

Welcome to ePhotozine, With your specialised practice being portraiture, i'd love to see you upload some images to your portfolio, (or even this thread).
I'd be keen to know what course you are on as i've an interest in photography tuition.

To answer your question i'd say that the theme of identity of a portrait photographer is one of empathy and understanding from the photographer as i believe they are attempting to capture potentially true representations of the subject that are then conveyed to the viewerer of the photograph. To get such images you'd either work with actors or develop a good understanding of your actual subjects persona and the way they'd like to be seen by others.
There after its all down to skills, particularly as above lighting, scene/environment, camera angles. mood etc.

Anyway, would love to see some of your work here on ePhotozine especially your photographic journey as you develop your own skills.

Best wishes,
Stuart
miptog 14 3.6k 63 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2020 12:56PM
lemmy 13 2.8k United Kingdom
15 Jul 2020 4:43PM
The best way to answer your questions would be for you to study the work of great portraitists like Annie Leibovitz, David Bailey, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton, Julia Margeret Cameron and read what they and the critics have to say about their metier. That way you'll get something original to say for your task rather than just the opinions of people like me as here

I'd also mention that there are no inherent professional standards, just the standards that individual photographers work by. That can be from the crass rudeness of Karsh snatching Churchill's cigar to watching Patrick Lichfield smarm his way to getting what he wants as I once did. If it works, it works. What does 'the theme of identity mean, by the way?
nicollehuxley New Member 7
15 Jul 2020 7:04PM

Quote:The best way to answer your questions would be for you to study the work of great portraitists like Annie Leibovitz, David Bailey, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton, Julia Margeret Cameron and read what they and the critics have to say about their metier. That way you'll get something original to say for your task rather than just the opinions of people like me as here

I'd also mention that there are no inherent professional standards, just the standards that individual photographers work by. That can be from the crass rudeness of Karsh snatching Churchill's cigar to watching Patrick Lichfield smarm his way to getting what he wants as I once did. If it works, it works. What does 'the theme of identity mean, by the way?



Yeh that is part of the assignment but I need generate evidence of peer reviews on this topic as part of my research all well be collaborated within my journal on portraiture. The identity theme is as you interpret this- my interpretation is portraits that have artistic value distortion maybe using post processing or props to either show an individuals identity, their job role as their identity, religions and believes for example.
lemmy 13 2.8k United Kingdom
15 Jul 2020 7:50PM

Quote: my interpretation is portraits that have artistic value distortion
Take a look at some of Bill Brandt's work. And you really must look at Dorothea Lange's unblinkered portraiture, harsh reality but compassion radiates from it. It is breathtaking. Her portrait of Florence Thomson is one of the greatest. Here's what she says - which must be the sort of thing you are looking for.

"I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean-to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it."
nicollehuxley New Member 7
15 Jul 2020 8:20PM

Quote:
Quote: my interpretation is portraits that have artistic value distortion
Take a look at some of Bill Brandt's work. And you really must look at Dorothea Lange's unblinkered portraiture, harsh reality but compassion radiates from it. It is breathtaking. Her portrait of Florence Thomson is one of the greatest. Here's what she says - which must be the sort of thing you are looking for.

"I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean-to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it."



Wow sounds great Thankyou

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