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Prior to Digital


Pete Plus
19 18.8k 97 England
19 Jan 2016 12:12PM
Here's a good article showing what happened prior to digital...and those perfectionists who dont like digital because of perceived cheating through manipulation might take note that manipulation has always been the case.
http://petapixel.com/2013/09/12/marked-photographs-show-iconic-prints-edited-darkroom
Chris_L 6 5.5k United Kingdom
19 Jan 2016 12:49PM
I used to feel as if it was cheating when I ran an image through Photoshop, then I woke up. I realised that photography, to me, isn't a sport and that the end result is all that matters. I probably do 80% to 99% in camera and the remainder in post pro. I've seen posts on here who I would class as 'digital artists', not photographers. They spend far more image time away from the camera. Doesn't matter. The final image will please some and not others, no matter how it's arrived at. How they get there is not important.

I've just sent the article you linked to an events and wedding photographer friend. When he first saw Lightroom in action, he threw his hands in the air saying the game was over for him and now anyone could be a photographer. I'm coaxing him back to a more realistic position and demonstrating that without good source material, good composition etc his stuff won't be bettered just because someone has some software he's not learned to use. Yet Wink

7Wishes 5 61 United Kingdom
19 Jan 2016 3:13PM

Quote:I used to feel as if it was cheating when I ran an image through Photoshop, then I woke up. I realised that photography, to me, isn't a sport and that the end result is all that matters ..... The final image will please some and not others, no matter how it's arrived at. How they get there is not important.



totally agree

Photoshop was originally designed for a mass market as a digital solution to the darkroom http://www.creativebloq.com/adobe/history-photoshop-12052724 Those who say editing is a cheat, the so called purists are the ones that draw lines in the sand and have a very dogmatic approach to what can and cannot be considered photography or indeed a photograph. Most people (non photographic) have no idea of the principles of photography or how the final image came to being, they will either like, or dislike based on how aesthetically pleasing it is to them and not how technically good or bad it is


Quote:
I've just sent the article you linked to an events and wedding photographer friend. When he first saw Lightroom in action, he threw his hands in the air saying the game was over for him and now anyone could be a photographer. I'm coaxing him back to a more realistic position and demonstrating that without good source material, good composition etc his stuff won't be bettered just because someone has some software he's not learned to use. Yet Wink



Does having a photo-taking device make you a photographer?
The belief is once you buy a camera you are photographer. SO that means if I buy a Cello...... I own a cello. - Vincent Versace
andybebbs 12 610 1 England
19 Jan 2016 3:29PM
Must admit i think its more about what you can do in the editing than the photo itself i have been looking at this web site photoserge.com and if you look at his tutorials it seems to be more about manipulating the photo after in photoshop or the like than the photo itself.
Just my opinion guys horses for courses.
www.photoserge.com/
Andy
Paul Morgan 19 19.5k 6 England
20 Jan 2016 12:52AM

Quote:Here's a good article showing what happened prior to digital...and those perfectionists who dont like digital because of perceived cheating through manipulation might take note that manipulation has always been the case.
http://petapixel.com/2013/09/12/marked-photographs-show-iconic-prints-edited-darkroom



I always found that no two prints in the darkroom were ever identically the same, there would always be some subtle difference no matter how hard I tried Smile

With digital you can save the results and print as many as you like and they will all be the same.
7Wishes 5 61 United Kingdom
20 Jan 2016 1:47AM

Quote:
Quote:Here's a good article showing what happened prior to digital...and those perfectionists who dont like digital because of perceived cheating through manipulation might take note that manipulation has always been the case.
http://petapixel.com/2013/09/12/marked-photographs-show-iconic-prints-edited-darkroom



I always found that no two prints in the darkroom were ever identically the same, there would always be some subtle difference no matter how hard I tried Smile

With digital you can save the results and print as many as you like and they will all be the same.



there is something quite magical about seeing the print appearing in the swirling developer and the red light of the darkroom that is lost in the digital world
20 Jan 2016 5:31AM
Interesting insight to professional B&W film photography, thanks! As comparing it to modern digital workflow - well, it is all quite different now. Zone system markings of which can be seen in article images pretty much is out of use. This allows incredible personalisation of image development, and everything may be as simple or as complex as one wishes for. Complex procedures however are still called "cheating" by someone who did not care to master them. This has not changedSmile
dcash29 15 2.4k England
20 Jan 2016 5:34PM

Quote:Here's a good article showing what happened prior to digital...and those perfectionists who dont like digital because of perceived cheating through manipulation might take note that manipulation has always been the case.
http://petapixel.com/2013/09/12/marked-photographs-show-iconic-prints-edited-darkroom



I don't think the article refers to what the so called 'Perfectionists' class as manipulation and cheating, as its basic dodging and burning.
7Wishes 5 61 United Kingdom
20 Jan 2016 7:06PM

Quote:

I don't think the article refers to what the so called 'Perfectionists' class as manipulation and cheating, as its basic dodging and burning.



and there lies the problem ... what can and cannot be classed as manipulation and who decides
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
20 Jan 2016 8:31PM
The only ones who have the problem are the so-called perfectionists, and they will think they decide.
dcash29 15 2.4k England
20 Jan 2016 9:36PM
I would class them as 'Purist'. You have those that hate the thought of change to their skill and those who struggle to convert to the new advances.

You will all possibly experience it or empathise when you see someone close to you go through it.

StrayCat 16 19.1k 3 Canada
20 Jan 2016 11:48PM
There was a female photographer way back, early 1900s I think, who was noted for her manipulation of her images in the darkroom. I remember seeing one of her photos where she's sitting at a small table, with herself sitting opposite, having a cup of tea. There were many more examples, but I don't think many would doubt she was a photographer. (Hmmm...maybe she had a twin.) Maybe it was much earlier.
StrayCat 16 19.1k 3 Canada
20 Jan 2016 11:57PM
I'm not trying to outdo Pete's article, but have a look at this one. The odd cameras further into the article are amazing.
NeilSchofield Plus
13 1.6k 1 United Kingdom
21 Jan 2016 8:01AM

Quote:I'm not trying to outdo Pete's article, but have a look at this one. The odd cameras further into the article are amazing.


Interesting article, just goes to show that there is not a lot new under the sun

I still use a gunsight on my long lens
StrayCat 16 19.1k 3 Canada
21 Jan 2016 7:31PM
I have done quite a bit of target practice with rifles and pistols, and also hunting when I was much younger, and when I put a camera up to my eye, I almost always think of sighting a rifle, and holding steady.

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