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Quality of Polarizer Filters - price differences...???


webjam 15 292 11 Netherlands
17 Oct 2008 4:33PM
Despite the fact that Conrad already has a Sigma 10-20 mm lens, I am going to buy one myself too. Trying to avoid fights about who can have the lens during the Rowardennan meet next month Smile.

What I can't understand is the quality of the Polarizer filter. In the internet shop that I want to buy they mention 2 polarizers of Hoya.
One is mentioned as ' Hoya Circular Polarizer (Variable Contrast Control/Glare Reduction) Filter 77mm ' for 83 euroos.
The other one is listed as: ' Hoya SHMC Super Multi-Coated Circular Polarizer Filter 77mm ' for 189 euroos.......
Then there is also a 'B+W 77E Circular Polarizer Filter 77mm ' for 159 euroos.

I want to reduce the reflections and add more contrast in the sky. I expect the first one of the list to do that. But what does the expensive filter do what the cheaper version doesn't?
Can anyone explain this for me?

(BTW will use a ND grad filter as well.)

Jacqueline

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conrad 15 10.9k 116
17 Oct 2008 5:21PM
Bump - Any CP filter experts out there who know the difference between the filters Jacqueline mentions?
csurry 17 9.2k 92
17 Oct 2008 5:26PM
Jacqueline, it is all to do with quality of glass and coatings - just like lenses with nano-coatings or whatever name marketing departments come up with.

So Hoya are a good make and I doubt you'll have any problems with the cheaper model. If really depends where your lens ranks in the grand scale of things. If you had a 1000 lens with all the latest anti-reflection coatings no point (in theory though maybe less so in practice) skimping and putting on a filter that may not be of equal quality.

B+W also well respected manufacturer.

Grin

HTH
User_Removed 12 2.2k 3 United Kingdom
17 Oct 2008 5:28PM
I've used the cheaper of the two Hoya ones and its fine. I just get irritated with screw-ins. I dropped it into a river by accident about a year ago and didn't bother replacing it.
webjam 15 292 11 Netherlands
17 Oct 2008 5:40PM
Thanks for sharing your ideas. It is true of course. No use of buying a 'cheap' filter for an expensive lens!
I was just wondering whether it would be visible to see the difference of these 2 filters.
And I would hate to see a filter ruin some of the quality that the lens would normally deliver. I think that is my bit of fear.

I am buying this lens cause I want to find out whether I can be good at landscapes or that it is just not me. So I also want to do it right in one time.... Smile If landscapes and I don't work out together I will sell the lens later on.

OK, now I have to decide between the B&W and the Hoya... Smile

Thank you both!

Jacqueline
andytvcams 16 10.4k 1 United Kingdom
17 Oct 2008 5:50PM
I would go with the Hoya SHMC it has five anti reflective coatings each side of the glass and if memory serves me right Hoya is a thinner filter.
webjam 15 292 11 Netherlands
17 Oct 2008 5:54PM
But would you see the difference in the endresults: the picture itself?

It is a lot of money - well, for me it is.

(If it would improve my photography skills I would go for it, of course... Smile )

Jacqueline
User_Removed 12 2.2k 3 United Kingdom
17 Oct 2008 5:54PM

Quote:
I am buying this lens cause I want to find out whether I can be good at landscapes or that it is just not me. So I also want to do it right in one time.... If landscapes and I don't work out together I will sell the lens later on.



It's a beast of a lens and no mistake. I must admit I wouldn't want to use it FF. I used it on a 30D and the results were highly entertaining but I think it would simply be too wide on my 5D. Wide-angle landscaping is something of an learned art, methinks, and perceiving the appropriate attributes in the landscape without the aid of the lens takes practice. What to the eye are interesting details can be quickly thrown into the distance by the lens divergence and there's tricks to learn in coping with verticals and horizontals but it is fun trying things out.

There'll be no end of willing hands to take it away from you if you don't get on with it. I've used the Hoya with the 10-20 and, again, it was fine. Just watch your position relative to the sun because you'll get a noticeable dark patch at 90 degrees with a lens that wide.
webjam 15 292 11 Netherlands
17 Oct 2008 6:06PM
I was able to use the lens when Conrad and I were on holiday in Scotland last May. We ended up in the Lake District (that is a complete different story) where I got to use his 10-20 lens which I liked much better then the 18-55 mm kit lens of my Canon 300D. Even though I messed up some of the pictures with that dark patch of the polarizer...

Later that week when we were in Pickwick bay (or something like that) and I wished for those extra mm's to capture the view of the rocks and the sea! But Conrad was way too busy to exchange lenses with me. And to be honest, I do not like to change lenses a lot because I hate cleaning sensors so much.

Jacqueline
andytvcams 16 10.4k 1 United Kingdom
17 Oct 2008 6:13PM
To be honest if your just testing the waters so to speak i would not bother with a Polarizer.

I use a Hoya skylight 1B Filter and that never comes off my lens.
As for a polarizer its the least used filter in my kit.
webjam 15 292 11 Netherlands
17 Oct 2008 6:22PM
What does a skylight filter do?

Jacqueline
andytvcams 16 10.4k 1 United Kingdom
17 Oct 2008 6:25PM

Quote:What does a skylight filter do?



It warms the picture up. and i know that shooting it in raw will make no difference yet i like to see the effect im after on the back of the camera.
and of course it protects your lens.
webjam 15 292 11 Netherlands
17 Oct 2008 6:33PM
Oh, I always shoot in RAW and like to adjust the temperature later on, often just to experiment. Mostly I have the White Balance on Cloudy, which also warms up the picture.

Guess I am so used of using a UV filter to protect the lens... Never thought about a Skylight filter.
Mmmm, this is not going to be easy, is it? Smile

Jacqueline
andytvcams 16 10.4k 1 United Kingdom
17 Oct 2008 6:34PM

Quote:Guess I am so used of using a UV filter to protect the lens... Never thought about a Skylight filter.
Mmmm, this is not going to be easy, is it?



Just use a UV and see how you get on.
boony 12 978 3 United Kingdom
17 Oct 2008 6:35PM

Quote:Thanks for sharing your ideas. It is true of course. No use of buying a 'cheap' filter for an expensive lens!
I was just wondering whether it would be visible to see the difference of these 2 filters.
And I would hate to see a filter ruin some of the quality that the lens would normally deliver. I think that is my bit of fear.



Jacqueline



i think anything you attach to the front of a lens will affect quality - they are made to be used as they come from by the manufacturers , i.e. without any other glass involved. i tried removing my uv`s a while back and wouldnt go back to having them on the front of any of my lenses, unless shotting in something like a sandstorm. they affected sharpness colour and contrast , i couldnt believe the difference it made. these were hoya 77mil uv`s

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