RAW software


saltireblue Plus
9 9.4k 35 Norway
25 Mar 2011 4:13PM
Many many thanks for the response to and information in my thread on RAW (or should that be raw) v. JPEG

Going on from there....I have two bits of 'free' software on my pc:

Canon's DPP and the RAW bit of Elements 9

What are the views of the experienced people out there on these two pieces of software? For a raw virgin like myself, I don't feel I can justify (yet) buying RAW software, but would like to hear opinions on which of these two is considered the best to use.
I can see I will yet again get a split in opinions, but that just makes it all the more interesting and worth following up.
Thanks in advance.
Malc

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miptog 13 3.6k 62 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 4:45PM

Quote:Canon's DPP and the RAW bit of Elements 9


It really comes down to which you prefer using and will fit your workflow.
TerryMcK 10 72 2 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 4:57PM
Hi, Malc,
I use Canon's DPP to perform most of my RAW editing, including cropping and re-sizing. I then convert to JPEG & open the file in Paint Shop Pro to add finer tweaks where needed.
If necessary, I use the free "Noiseware" to reduce unwanted noise.
Although I have tried a trial version of Element, I was not persuaded to buy after a month's use.
There are several free photography software programmes to be found on the Internet. In my opinion, one of the most user-friendly packages is "Irfanview." Although fairly basic in content, add-ons from the Irfanview homepage allow you to open & edit Canon's RAW files which can then be saved as JPEG.
Hope this is of some help to you.
Terry
saltireblue Plus
9 9.4k 35 Norway
25 Mar 2011 5:43PM

Quote:My views on DPP are that its routines are written by the same software engineers who program the Digic chip in a Canon DSLR that turns raw data from the sensor into a JPEG on the memory card. They spec the Canon raw format. They don't use trial, error and reverse engineering like third parties do to handle the files. They possess an advantage in producing both the camera and the software.

They don't have to worry about their software working with other manufacturers' raw formats or lenses and can concentrate on wringing the best image quality from Canon files.

What I've just said is all fine on paper, but what about in practice?

DPP produces brilliant images and has great tools. Whilst it has a decent ratings system it doesn't have the library functions of the likes of Lightroom.

The DPP software has advanced leaps and bounds over the past 18 months.

You owe it to yourself to learn how to use DPP properly (lots of videos on YouTube) be sure to give it a fair crack of the whip.

Me, I wouldn't be without it.



That sounds like the sort of info I want, so that I can look further into it.
What you say about the system being dedicated to Canon technology makes sense.
I have tinkered with both, and my first impression was that DPP was better, but being a raw virgin as stated, I wanted to hear about the experiences and impressions of others. Youtube, here I come.


But what about RAW in Elements? Nobody got anything positive to say on that?
saltireblue Plus
9 9.4k 35 Norway
25 Mar 2011 5:45PM

Quote:Hi, Malc,
I use Canon's DPP to perform most of my RAW editing, including cropping and re-sizing. I then convert to JPEG & open the file in Paint Shop Pro to add finer tweaks where needed.
If necessary, I use the free "Noiseware" to reduce unwanted noise.
Although I have tried a trial version of Element, I was not persuaded to buy after a month's use.
There are several free photography software programmes to be found on the Internet. In my opinion, one of the most user-friendly packages is "Irfanview." Although fairly basic in content, add-ons from the Irfanview homepage allow you to open & edit Canon's RAW files which can then be saved as JPEG.
Hope this is of some help to you.
Terry


Cheers, Terry. That sounds interesting about the add-ons you mention in connection with "Irfanview". Will have a look at that.
Malc
cameracat 15 8.6k 61 Norfolk Island
25 Mar 2011 6:09PM

Quote:But what about RAW in Elements


First I'd like to echo Chris L's finding regarding Canons DPP, I find the same applies to my Nikon Software with regard to Nikon raw file formats......Grin

When you stop to think about it, The makers own software has a major advantage with RAW......!

That said Adobe Camera Raw has improved a great deal over the last few years, So try using your ACR in Elements as well........Grin

However try some straight conversions, Using DPP & ACR in Elements, The do a side by side comparsion, You " Might " prefer what comes out of ACR.....A personal thing....Smile

Personally I stick with Canon DPP for RAW to lets say Tiff conversion, Do the magic pixel bashing in Elements, Then save to your chosen file format.....!!!!

Whatever try and find a workflow, Then stick to it, This way a certain amount of consistency & continuity can be " Developed " LOL Pun intended.....Tongue

Wink
saltireblue Plus
9 9.4k 35 Norway
25 Mar 2011 6:25PM

Quote:

However try some straight conversions, Using DPP & ACR in Elements, The do a side by side comparsion, You " Might " prefer what comes out of ACR.....A personal thing....Smile


Whatever try and find a workflow, Then stick to it, This way a certain amount of consistency & continuity can be " Developed " LOL Pun intended.....Tongue

Wink


Two very good pieces of advice, especially about establishing a workflow. Thanks!
videoman Plus
14 58 1 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 6:53PM
Hi Malc,
Just to give you a bit more of a balanced view, I have used Canon DPP, ACR, Lightroom 2, BreezeBrowser Pro and Capture One Express.
I started with DPP obviously because it came with the camera and it was free. I managed with it until I got PS Elements and ACR which I found a much better user interface, but I noticed all the conversions in ACR were very slightly "warmer". Quite nice for some portraits but not for everything and not a great interface.
I then met a pro photographer who swore by BreezeBrowser Pro (put in into Google), which was only about $60 at the time so I bought it.
The user interface is way better than DPP and ACR and it is very fast. If you do any website work, particularly creating web galleries, it's worth the money just for the web gallery html templates you get.
However, I wanted something I could use almost as a "standalone", where you can straighten horizons, crop, adjust and print without having to use PS but with a better user interface and that's when I tried Capture One.
Once you have used it there's no going back, all the other interfaces feel awkward or incomplete, but obviously you need to try it for yourself. I've introduced several friends to it and they all say the same thing "Why didn't I try this before"?
Just a couple of comments on previous posts:
DPP must be best because Canon make the cameras.
Well just think how much they are likely to continue to invest in a product they give away for free?
And if they didn't share their RAW format details with Adobe, for example, that would be like a printer manufacturer keeping the drivers secret from Microsoft and Apple!
Of course it's partly down to personal preference so download some trials and give them a go, but for heaven's sake don't stick with DPP!
tomcat 13 6.4k 15 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 6:54PM
Not sure if the RAW feature in Elements, has all the features of the RAW feature in full blown CS.
It didn't use to have.

I edit my RAW images in CS 4/5 & then final tweak in the main programme

Adrian
arhb Plus
12 3.4k 68 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 6:58PM
One thing I've noticed about DPP, is that the highlight alert(Alt M) needs to be viewed at 100% to notice the finest highlights.
If you view the full image on-screen when making exposure adjustments, you may miss the finer highlights.

I do agree with videoman regarding Capture One - superb s/ware.
videoman Plus
14 58 1 United Kingdom
26 Mar 2011 4:55PM
Thanks for your comments Chris_L,
I do have the latest version of DPP but you mis-quoted me.
I wrote: "I wanted something I could use almost as a "standalone", where you can straighten horizons, crop, adjust and print without having to use PS but with a better user interface". You missed out the important last part.
Also, Canon obviously has the conversion algorithms already, as you say, but that doesn't mean they are spending a lot of money on improving the usability and it shows.
Having used both DPP and Capture One, I'm simply sharing my views from a position of experience.
videoman Plus
14 58 1 United Kingdom
27 Mar 2011 10:16PM

Quote:What version of DPP you got?


I have DPP version 3.8.0.0 but I note that version 3.9 is now out so I'm actually not right up to date.

However, I don't check very often as I nearly always use Cature One. I occasionally still use BreezeBrowser Pro if I'm doing web galleries and as you have also used it you'll know why, the templates are just so easy!
Regards.
petemasty 10 155 England
28 Mar 2011 5:53PM
I used DPP to convert my Canon RAW files to TIFF (with a few minor tweaks mainly Curves and CA reduction. I then did any further editing in PSPX2 before finally converting to JPEG. DPP is a very good raw converter. however I now use Lightroom 3.3 as I got it as part of a bundle.


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