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Resolution Problem


ChrisV 14 2.3k 26 United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 11:39AM
Yeah, you need to do as Phil above says - make sure your focus point is locked to whatever you want sharp. I'd also stop the lens down a bit and as Chris says, you need to up the shutter speed so you aren't running the risk of either camera shake, or motion blur from rustling leaves. That might knock your ISO up in these circumstances to something like ISO 800 [or even more], but a bit of noise would be better than fuzzy detail.

What sort of size are you wanting to reproduce at? If you're not using all that resolution you may not notice that lack of critical sharpness once you print out anyway - although of course it is good practice to get the most of out of your source image in the first place.
Philh04 Plus
16 2.3k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 12:31PM
f4.5 @ 33mm is probably wide open for that lens, for best performance you need to stop down by at least one and preferably two stops.

How many focus points are you using?

Your 70% zoom looks to be more... if you use DPP I believe it will show you where the active focus point is.

As stated 1/50th is not ideal if you are learning, particularly with a crop sensor... up the ISO to achieve at least 1/100 - 1/160 @ f8 and see what happens.
ryhne 4 2
23 Jun 2017 1:13PM
I guess the problem was the focus.
because the only thing clear is the bushes on the bottom left corner.

thank you for your answers.
I will try them next time I want to take photos Smile
Philh04 Plus
16 2.3k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 2:17PM
I am going to guess that you have all focus points active, on a complicated subject this will inevitably result in missed focus as the AF will try to focus on the nearest/highest contrast object in the frame. Try switching to centre focus point, focus on what you want sharp and then keeping the shutter button half depressed recompose, then full depress to take the image.
thewilliam2 4 1.6k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 2:37PM

Quote:
f4.5 @ 33mm is probably wide open for that lens, for best performance you need to stop down by at least one and preferably two stops.


The Nikon version of the 18-55 kit lens is actually quite sharp when used wide-open.

When composing a shot, I'd suggest that we need to decide which part of the scene is most important and focus here. I'm unfamiliar with the concept of "all focus points active".
ChrisV 14 2.3k 26 United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 2:43PM

Quote:
Quote:
f4.5 @ 33mm is probably wide open for that lens, for best performance you need to stop down by at least one and preferably two stops.


The Nikon version of the 18-55 kit lens is actually quite sharp when used wide-open.

When composing a shot, I'd suggest that we need to decide which part of the scene is most important and focus here. I'm unfamiliar with the concept of "all focus points active".



It's the 'dummy mode' on Canon bodies. Essentially it's choosing focus for you - looking at the scene and usually choosing the closest subject. It would be the default if you just leave the camera on full auto [I think that's the square on top of the mode dial if memory serves?]
thewilliam2 4 1.6k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 2:55PM

Quote:

It's the 'dummy mode' on Canon bodies. Essentially it's choosing focus for you - looking at the scene and usually choosing the closest subject. It would be the default if you just leave the camera on full auto [I think that's the square on top of the mode dial if memory serves?]



Many thanks for that
Philh04 Plus
16 2.3k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 3:28PM

Quote:The Nikon version of the 18-55 kit lens is actually quite sharp when used wide-open.

But the subject is not calling out for the focus to be isolated it is calling for more DoF as you pointed out in an earlier post!

Indeed, some can be, however I have seen quite a bit of variation and will always recommend at least stopping down by one stop on a consumer lens, there are always exceptions and of course in PP we can correct for any softness, not something I would encourage a beginner to do though, learning your equipment and what it can do is far more important IMO.

All Focus Points active as Chris points out is the Canon default even if you move off the full auto exposure etc mode. I believe the Nikon equivalent is AF-Area Mode, it can and does very often focus on the nearest or highest contrast part of the scene.
thewilliam2 4 1.6k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 4:58PM
Something over half a century ago, my old housemaster who ran the school photographic society, taught us to get to know our cameras and this included learning how the lens behaved as it was stopped down. In those days, there were no published MTF charts so we had to do the tests ourselves but most of us had far less kit in those days and tended to keep it for much longer.

The late Albert Ridgley of Leica always encouraged purchasers to "make friends" with their camera and this advice is as sound as it ever was.

The OP would find it useful to spend a couple of hours finding out just what his camera will and won't do. Metadata means that he doesn't need to take notes and there's no film to develop.

For me, this investment and understanding mean that I don't change my kit without a very good reason. One of the best ways for a photographer to waste money is to constantly "upgrade" kit that already delivers what he/she needs.
thewilliam2 4 1.6k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 5:05PM

Quote:
Quote:
f4.5 @ 33mm is probably wide open for that lens, for best performance you need to stop down by at least one and preferably two stops.


The Nikon version of the 18-55 kit lens is actually quite sharp when used wide-open.



I mentioned this because, it's no longer safe to assume that lenses need to be stopped down to gain sharpness. In the good 'ol days, only the very best lenses performed well when wide open but nowadays even some real cheapies like the Nikon 18-55mm are very nearly as sharp at full aperture. A Canon owner should run some tests or consult the published MTF chart if he/she can read it.
Philh04 Plus
16 2.3k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 5:18PM

Quote:Something over half a century ago, my old housemaster who ran the school photographic society, taught us to get to know our cameras and this included learning how the lens behaved as it was stopped down. In those days, there were no published MTF charts so we had to do the tests ourselves but most of us had far less kit in those days and tended to keep it for much longer.

The late Albert Ridgley of Leica always encouraged purchasers to "make friends" with their camera and this advice is as sound as it ever was.

The OP would find it useful to spend a couple of hours finding out just what his camera will and won't do.


thewilliam2, Is that not what I have already said? I find it strange that you seem to try and contradict others whilst saying the same thing...
thewilliam2 4 1.6k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 7:21PM
Phil, it seems to me that the OP's basic problem is lack of knowledge about what the camera should be doing.

Would you not agree that a modest investment of time in getting to know the camera would be worthwhile?
Philh04 Plus
16 2.3k United Kingdom
23 Jun 2017 7:42PM

Quote:Phil, it seems to me that the OP's basic problem is lack of knowledge about what the camera should be doing.

Would you not agree that a modest investment of time in getting to know the camera would be worthwhile?


But isn't that what I have been saying?

From an earlier post of mine;

Quote:learning your equipment and what it can do is far more important IMO.


We seem to be agreeing but you appear not to have read my input fully which is where we may be at odds.
ttiger8 Plus
6 159 United Kingdom
25 Jun 2017 1:53PM
Whilst I agree with what been said, personally I don't think the Canon 18-55mm kit lens is a very good lens. I have two of them that came with different bodies and I never use them now. Their sweet spot is F8 and I usually aim for minimum shutter speed of 1/125 when hand held. This means that you get OK images on bright days with plenty of light. Where the light wasn't so good I often found I was shooting with the lens wide open and ISO in the 400 to 800 range or using a tripod.

First lens I got that was a big improvement was the Canon 50mm f1.8. Image quality was greatly improved with the advantage of having a wider aperture to cope with less light and sharp images even wide open. Disadvantage of a fixed focal length and shallow depth of field when wide open.

I then got a Sigma 18-200mm with image stabilisation which again was a great improvement on image quality compared to the kit lens and is still my preferred lens that I use most of the time.

I also have a Pentax with an 18-55mm kit lens and as has been mentioned about the Nikon one, to me its a little gem and is much better than the Canon offering which reinforces for me that the Canon kit lens is not that good.

So whilst I agree with the advice given i.e. sort out the focus priority and watch the shutter speed, the lens you have has its limitations and in my opinion you would be happier with a better lens. Ideally something in the Canon L range but if you don't want to pay out that much money, something from Sigma (or possibly Tamron but I have no experience with their lenses) will be better than what you have. Get the best you can afford and I would personally recommend something with image stabilisation.

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