Ring or not?


monstersnowman 14 1.7k 1 England
10 Sep 2012 2:37PM

Quote:I think the point being made is that what there was to be learnt by ringing has been done and dusted, i.e. there is nothing more to learn in that fashion. So, why do it?


Having 'nothing more to learn' is a bold statement ;o) Maybe should population levels change drastically, without warning, then the continued monitoring may have been a good idea rather than playing catch-up and perhaps even closing the gate after the kingfisher has bolted ..

ok, they dont use gates ... I'll get mi coat :o/

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

Gaucho 17 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
10 Sep 2012 7:13PM
I think I've sussed why Alan doesn't want his birds ringed. More Photoshop work trying to get rid of them Wink
Carabosse 16 41.3k 270 England
10 Sep 2012 8:05PM

Quote:More Photoshop work trying to get rid of them


Ah yes! Good thinking! Grin
mdpontin 15 6.0k Scotland
11 Sep 2012 12:25PM
I must admit to similar feelings of unease seeing other wild birds being hauled out of their nests, weighed, measured, ringed, fitted with tracking devices, etc. It's hard not to see it as traumatising, at least to some degree. I'm aware, though that there is a human tendency to anthropomorphise the reactions on non-human species, so I could be making all kinds of wrong assumptions.

What I do wonder, though, is this. How long have we been ringing birds? Can we not come up with a less intrusive way of tagging and tracking wild creatures, given the huge technological advances that have been made in the intervening time? Okay, financial cost is also a relevant factor, but still...I'd be interested to know whether there's a way to get the data currently collected by manually clipping tags to legs, or strapping some unwieldy-looking satellite tracking 'backpack' to a bird, without all the difficulty, disruption, and intrusion currently involved. After all, one of the tenets of animal/bird welfare is to minimise disturbance by us noisy, inconsiderate humans, is it not?
11 Sep 2012 12:32PM

Quote: Can we not come up with a less intrusive way of tagging and tracking wild creatures,

My dogs are micro chipped, the oldest was done possible 10 years ago.
I have a RSPB friend who is very much in favour of ringing, I will pass on these comments.

Gaucho 17 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
11 Sep 2012 2:09PM
I wondered about micro chipping. Works very well on dogs but I guess a skinny little bird would be a bit difficult.
11 Sep 2012 3:00PM

Quote:I wondered about micro chipping. Works very well on dogs but I guess a skinny little bird would be a bit difficult.


You seen how fat the kingfishers are.
I feed them loads of fish.
macroman 16 15.3k England
11 Sep 2012 3:08PM
Would micro-chipping affect the birds navigation 'circuitry'?
I don't know the range of a chip, but I suspect that it's only a few yards, so how would you know if the bird has been chipped unless you were vey close to it?
With a ring you can observe it from a fair distance with binoculars.
Also micro-chipping on a large scale in the field could lead to infection and loss of life, unless you could guarantee near-sterile conditions, wading birds/ducks would be a major problem due to the risk from infected water, although I suppose you could tumble dry them Smile.

PS, chicken is nice micro-waved. Smile
mdpontin 15 6.0k Scotland
11 Sep 2012 3:23PM
Apparently, one way to get closer observations of some types of bird in the field is by " pishing ". I kid you not.
adrian_w Plus
12 3.8k 4 England
11 Sep 2012 3:46PM
well somebody has to say it:
thats a load of pish.
macroman 16 15.3k England
11 Sep 2012 4:13PM

Quote:Many birders also believe, after watching birds respond to their pishing, that some species of birds have a natural curiosity ..........quote]

Love it! Grin

mdpontin 15 6.0k Scotland
11 Sep 2012 6:42PM

Quote:Avoid pishing in sensitive areas, such as near nesting sites or when a rare bird has been sighted.

Couldn't agree more! Grin
macroman 16 15.3k England
11 Sep 2012 8:08PM
So, pishing attracts the birds, wish I'd known that as a teenager! Grin
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
12 Sep 2012 3:02PM

Quote:This question was asked of me by someone who knows I am anti kingfisher ringing:
"What evidence have you to show that ringing the birds will traumatise them when the experts from the RSPB obviously considered it worthwhile. ??



Tagging/ringing, is good for the birds.

Any chance you can add group, to your thread heading, this is the third group I have joined that I have no interest in Sad

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.