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second body for wildlife D7100? D800? D600?


annettep38 Plus
8 219 42 Costa Rica
10 Jun 2013 10:40PM
(I'm asking this here, NOT in the Nikon forum as I have noticed that many Canon users use crop-sensor cameras for terrific wildlife shots)
Here it is: Someone is buying my D2x which I kept as a spare, just in case etc. But frankly, I have never looked back and just can't bear the idea of using it again if my d3x would be in repair.
So I got a very good full frame 6000x400 sensor camera and I am loving it. But sometimes I need to change very quickly and I am doing a bit other stuff now like weddings where a second camera would really come in handy.
Wildlife and nature is what I do most if I can though, have a look if you like. Now I got some great tele lenses, two antique long ones (500mm and 600mm, pre AF) and a modern zoom. It ocuured to me that I could save a lot of money if I aquired a D7100 and 'gained' the 1.5 factor and still have 25 MP.
Don't says Richard my tutor, It will never have the same quality you are used to. Get a d800 he says. But the viewfinder (cropped) would be tiny if I use only the inner part.. I replied... Well he said, but you can choose which crop from 36 MP.
My idea was to leave say the 200-400 on the crop sensor body - or the 500mm depending on the case.. and use my trusted d3x for everything else. Or at a wedding use the crop sensor for the portraits and the other one for the rest.

What do you think?

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janeez 11 1.8k 8 United Kingdom
10 Jun 2013 11:10PM
D800! But I am biased. Wink

He is absolutely right about the crop and you would be astonished at the amazing quality of the D800. My business partner uses the D4 and quite honestly I believe my D800 is equal in every way. Even in low light it's performance is fantastic.
11 Jun 2013 2:50AM
Being a Canon man, and an amateur I cannot give you any practical advice - only a general idea. Judge yourself if it will be handy...
I would go with pixel size, not overall megapixel count. If you find a crop sensor with pixel size close to your main camera you won`t loose too much in terms of image quality. I have two DSLRs with the same sensor size but very different pixel count, and of all images I published on EPZ by now the most votes were attracted by the ones taken with a camera with lesser pixel count - even as it is much older one.
Graysta 14 1.1k England
11 Jun 2013 6:17AM
D800 all the way and then you will want to sell the D3x as the D800 has far better low light performance.At weddings I can stand at the rear of the church with a 70 -200 and crop a pin sharp picture of the ring going on a finger with just the hands in it from the middle of a shot.
kodachrome 7 720
11 Jun 2013 8:28AM
I think many of us have sailed on past the best pixel/image quality ratio in the quest for more pixels [mostly driven by advertising] and I know some people have reverted back to older models with less pixels.
I remember Nikon saying only a couple or so years ago that in their opinion 12mp, and possibly 16 was the optimum number of pixels. However, I guess things have moved on a touch since that remark, but I still think it was a valid point.

The trouble with Full frame is the lenses, you need high quality lenses to do the FF sensor justice and that doesn't come cheap.
11 Jun 2013 9:12AM
Looked at camera specs - the closest match by pixel density would be D5000 model, and there are few of them on sale yet. Might be not bad as second/backup camera, and macro with it may be more interesting than with FF camera. Although it is not in the same category as D3x - have a better look if you wish. You will save big as compared to having a D800 (or D3x) collecting dust as a backup Wink Otherwise the only option would be D800, and your old trusty D3x as a backup - but oh my, that would be heavy set of gear.Smile
Gundog 6 629 Scotland
11 Jun 2013 9:23AM
When I wanted a second body to supplement my D800 (not so much as a back-up, but simply to have two lenses immediately available - for wildlife, it is sometimes very handy to have my old AIS 600mm non-AF on the tripod on one camera and the 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII available for hand-held wider shots), I thought long and hard about the sort of options you are considering, Annette.

In the end, I opted for the D800E, just for the theoretical additional "sharpness". I thought there were huge advantages to having two cameras with identical controls. In the event, at no meaningful print size, can I differentiate between the two cameras in terms of image quality, So I could have saved a couple of -hundred and just bought a second D800.

I tend to agree with much of what has been said above. It is a big mistake to compare any current Nikon DX camera with a D800. The D800 shot, taken at full-frame and then cropped if necessary in post-exposure processing, will always be better and also leave you with more editing options.

The only downside of a D800 is that, after using it awhile, you may regret the choice you made last year to go for the D3x rather than a D800 at that time.

.
annettep38 Plus
8 219 42 Costa Rica
11 Jun 2013 9:39AM
Please let me come back to the original question:
- i am after a SECOND body, i do NOT wish to replace my d3x. I am very happy with it. the format I get out of it is almost the size +/- 300 pixel
- the main purpose of this body would be to go on my tele or loooong lenses. meaning 80-200 2.8, 200-400 f4, 600 f 5.6. I use all those lenses almost exclusively hand held
- there are two things that worry me about the d800 (maybe they are just silly rumours) that you need much more computer memory (i have got 8GB which are almost impossible to upgrade) and that you need live view to take pictures because of some obscure shake problem. I am too old to work and focus on a tiny screen where you need a shade and all that
Coleslaw 14 13.4k 28 Wales
11 Jun 2013 9:50AM
D7100
Coventryphotog Junior Member 6 149 United Kingdom
11 Jun 2013 11:14AM
D800 - awesome body, as others describe above. It works perfectly well through the viewfinder Smile and my 8gb ram laptop manages to process the output.....
mikehit 10 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
11 Jun 2013 1:59PM

Quote:and that you need live view to take pictures because of some obscure shake problem


Can you expand on that?
Gundog 6 629 Scotland
11 Jun 2013 2:04PM

Quote:
- there are two things that worry me about the d800 (maybe they are just silly rumours) that you need much more computer memory (i have got 8GB which are almost impossible to upgrade) and that you need live view to take pictures because of some obscure shake problem. I am too old to work and focus on a tiny screen where you need a shade and all that



The lossless compressed Raw files from the D800 are around 45Mb. You certainly don't need more than 8Gb RAM but, as with all image processing matters, the processing speed depends upon a combination of factors - processor speed, RAM amount and speed, HD access speed, etc.,

The camera shake rumour is a red herring. Because you can enlarge images from a D800 much more than with other (current) cameras, you can obviously also exaggerate the appearance of flaws - such as camera shake, subject movement, poor focus, etc., etc. But, at the same degree of enlargement, the D800 does not display the effects of those problems to any greater extent than any other. The way the "problem" really should be stated is that, to take full advantage of the additional performance of the D800, your camera technique has to be up to scratch.

I have had the D800 for 15 months now and have never used "live view" yet - and can see no reason to do so. I think it is mainly for shooting movie clips. Certainly the viewfinder is more than adequate for normal manual focussing (as I do with my Nikkor 600mm f/4 AIS lens).
mikehit 10 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
11 Jun 2013 2:06PM
I have recently looked at a site by a wildlife photographer that compares the Canon 5D3 (22MP FF) with the Canon 7D (18MP APS-C) and he looked at this 'digital zoom' effect of the APS-C where people say it is better because you have more pixels on the subject. He showed there was not real-world advantage of the APS-C: the greater image quality of the 5D3 outweighs the digital zoom effect of the 7D.
I am pretty sure the D800 would show the same outcome, probably more so because it has more pixels than the 5D3. Plus the supreme lowlight performance of the D800 would give yuou a second option inside as well as outside.

But then again, it isn't my money and it all depends on how much use the 'second body' would actually get....
janeez 11 1.8k 8 United Kingdom
11 Jun 2013 2:25PM
8gb is what I have on my computer and no problem with the viewfinder. I only ever use live view when I hold the camera up to take crowd or table shots at weddings!
Graysta 14 1.1k England
11 Jun 2013 6:44PM

Quote:

Quote:
The trouble with Full frame is the lenses, you need high quality lenses to do the FF sensor justice and that doesn't come cheap.



Good Grief how did we manage to cover the area of 35mm film.
Never saw a great rush to buy APS film camera's. I think it was Olympus who caught a right cold with one of there rendition's of APS

/quote]Please let me come back to the original question:
- i am after a SECOND body, i do NOT wish to replace my d3x. I am very happy with it. the format I get out of it is almost the size +/- 300 pixel
Quote:

How I see it is if you buy a D800 you will want to replace your D3x



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