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Should I or shouldn't I?


15 Jan 2018 10:51AM
As this year I creep (or should that be creak) steadily towards my 72nd birthday, I wonder if its time to review my gear options,

I enjoy landscape, macro and wildlife and have built a kit to accommodate these genre. Currently EOS 80D, Tamron 10-24. Sigma 18-250 and Sigma 150-600 C with 1.4 tele-converter amongst others.

Not all carried at the same time I hasten to add.

I am reasonably fit and enjoy walking, but...

I now find (being a 10 stone plus weakling) that carrying the kit is becoming problematic and detracting from the pleasure of my photography.

I am considering migrating to micro four thirds. probably Olympus, but know very little about their cameras and lenses. Given that I would wish to still pursue my favoured photographic genres, I would appreciate comments (good and bad) from any fellow wrinklies who have made the change.

I look forward with interest to your expert replies.

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saltireblue Plus
9 9.8k 36 Norway
15 Jan 2018 11:04AM
I can only talk from my own limited brand knowledge, but for what it's worth...
18 months ago I switched from a 5Diii with 3 L lenses, the largest/heaviest being the 70-200 f/2.8, to the Fuji system, for much the same reasons you are contemplating.
I now have an X-T2 body with 18-55 f/2.8-4, 10-24 f/4, 25mm f/1.4 and 50-140 f/2.8 all in a sling back bag instead of a full rucksack for the Canon, and it all weighs in at under half the bulk and weight. (I also have an 80mm macro lens, but that stays at home as I only use it for macro indoors).
IQ-wise, I see no difference, except that the Canon 70-200 on the 5Diii is impossibly sharpSmile. The Fuji equivalent (50-140) is nearly as sharp, but not quite. Still more than good enough for us amateurs, though.

Malc
banehawi Plus
15 2.1k 4036 Canada
15 Jan 2018 12:54PM
The 80D is 150g lighter than the Fuji XT 2, which I dont think would make an enormous difference to you.

The lenses for Fuji would be lighter, smaller, but they are expensive, and you will certainly lose money in the transfer from selling the lenses you have an buying new gear. So it really depends on the amount of weight that you see as a problem.

M4/3, the weight difference between the 80D and an OLY EM10 MK2 is again about 150g, and the latest Panasonic weighs the same as a Canon 6D mk2 full frame.

Either the Fuji or the 80D will have superior overall image quality to the M4/3 when it comes to low light performance.

So try some of the options out there, and dont rule out some of the smaller all in one cameras with the so-called 1 inch sensor (its not one inch!)


Willie
15 Jan 2018 1:06PM
Interesting, certainly food for thought, thanks Willie
altitude50 15 16.1k United Kingdom
15 Jan 2018 1:21PM
I am 75 years old this year. Up to 8 months ago I had a Nikon D5200 (13,000 shutter actuations) with a variety of low to medium cost lenses (Nikon, Sigma, Tokina, Tamron.). I was reasonably happy with everything. Then I was offered a new Sony a6000 (-APS-C sensor, the same as the Nikon) at a ridiculously low price.
After a few weeks using the Sony I realised that it suited me better, the focusing was much quicker and it wasn't so bulky, images as good as if not better than the Nikon.(In my opinion).
So I sold most of my Nikon gear (I still have a couple of good 35mm SLR's with 50mm and short zoom lenses).
I bought one Sony E mount 55-210 zoom and a Sigma 30mm f1.4 (excellent) with the money I received and had money left over which I banked and do not regret the change.
The Sony a6300 is apparently better still than the a6000 but I have no intention of changing up.
saltireblue Plus
9 9.8k 36 Norway
15 Jan 2018 1:54PM

Quote:The lenses for Fuji would be lighter, smaller, but they are expensive, and you will certainly lose money in the transfer from selling the lenses you have an buying new gear

Not my experience.

I px'd 5Diii, 24-105, 70-200, 10-22, 100mm macro and got all the Fuji gear listed in my previous post and still had money to the good at the store. It depends on the age and condition of your equipment. Mine was in excellent condition.
15 Jan 2018 3:51PM

Quote:I am 75 years old this year. Up to 8 months ago I had a Nikon D5200 (13,000 shutter actuations) with a variety of low to medium cost lenses (Nikon, Sigma, Tokina, Tamron.). I was reasonably happy with everything. Then I was offered a new Sony a6000 (-APS-C sensor, the same as the Nikon) at a ridiculously low price.
After a few weeks using the Sony I realised that it suited me better, the focusing was much quicker and it wasn't so bulky, images as good as if not better than the Nikon.(In my opinion).
So I sold most of my Nikon gear (I still have a couple of good 35mm SLR's with 50mm and short zoom lenses).
I bought one Sony E mount 55-210 zoom and a Sigma 30mm f1.4 (excellent) with the money I received and had money left over which I banked and do not regret the change.
The Sony a6300 is apparently better still than the a6000 but I have no intention of changing up.

15 Jan 2018 3:52PM
Thanks for your valuable input - more research by me required methinks.
15 Jan 2018 4:29PM
When I get too old to carry my gear I think I will get myself a young bit of stuff to carry it for me.
Kill two birds with one stoneSmile

SteveSmile
15 Jan 2018 5:08PM
Ha ha in the long term that could prove to be an expensive option.🤑
adrian_w Plus
12 3.8k 4 England
15 Jan 2018 5:15PM
For similar reasons I swapped from a canon 5D & associated gear to an Olympus OM1D, 12-40 PRO, 40-150Pro & 60mm macro. Much lighter to carry round ( although the 40-150 is some weight). These lenses cover my interest areas of landscape, floral & macro, although I suspect if you went the same route you might need a longer lens for wildlife. Image quality is very good even in low light.
As I still have a lot of old olympus film lenses I bought an OM to 4/3 converter so I can use my old 300 & 500mm mirror lenses as well. The 500mm especially give awesome magnification but is a bugger to focus accurately. OK for static subjects but no good for moving.
15 Jan 2018 5:37PM
Thanks for the comments Adrian-w
StrayCat 15 19.1k 3 Canada
15 Jan 2018 8:32PM
I used MFT for over 2 years, and enjoyed it, got some of my best with it, and we had great fun discussing the kit on here. Eventually I tired of waiting for Olympus/Panasonic to release a good wildlife lens and moved on. I'm glad I did, because the long lenses were finally released, but they cost an arm and a leg, I would never pay those prices, the lenses aren't worth it; maybe 1/3 or 1/2 what they want. But, not for me. I looked at Sony, and did a lot of research, and finally decided I would have to use the lenses of other brands, so I decided to use the camera of another brand also, Canon. I didn't get the 80D because I don't need the weather sealing or better build quality, so I decided to try the 77D, and so far, I'm happy. I haven't had much time to get to terms with it due to other circumstances, but I've been reading what I can find on Canon, haven't used it for years. You seem to have good kit, but I suspect it's very heavy. Here's what I decided on: Canon 10-18MM STM, Canon 40mm f2.8 STM, Canon 55-250mm (A very surprisingly sharp lens at $189 on Amazon) and a Canon 300mm f4L IS USM. The only heavy piece of gear is the 300mm, but I've walked with it for over 3 hours, using a wrist strap on the camera, and it was a piece of cake. I have much the same interests in photography as you, wildlife/nature, and it's always a compromise getting the right mix of kit. I decided against a zoom such as a 70-300mm because my experience with every brand, and I've tried most, is that from about 220-300, they aren't quite as sharp. I've tried them with/without IS, and with/without tripods, and from reading reviews and comments, most others find the same problem. I've only used the Canon 300mm f4 a few times, but imo the ancient IS system works far better for me than any Nikon I've used, and seems to match the latest Canon systems on my other lenses. With the crop factor it's a 485mm lens, and I did 2 years with 400mm, and found that I get close enough to wildlife with that focal length. I may get a 1.4 TC, but right now, I don't need it. Take a look at the weight of the lenses I've mentioned; 10-18mm 240g, 55-250mm 375g,, and the 40mm 2.8 almost nothing. I think that long Tamron is your nemesis, I'd keep the 80D and find something more comfortable for a long telephoto, but if you feel you need that focal length, you might not reduce the weight by much. If you go to MFT, look at the Panasonic 100-400mm, it's the only long lens of reasonable quality that is priced close to reasonable. I'm 72 btw, and I find the Canon kit I have is within a few ounces of what I'd get in a matching MFT kit.

Good luck.
pink Plus
16 6.1k 7 United Kingdom
15 Jan 2018 8:53PM
What about a top end bridge camera; Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 IV , expensive but I'm sure your sale of kit would cover it off. they get very good reviews on many different sites, well worth a look in my opinion.
Ian
15 Jan 2018 10:02PM
[quoused MFT for over 2 years, and enjoyed it, got some of my best with it, and we had great fun discussing the kit on here. Eventually I tired of waiting for Olympus/Panasonic to release a good wildlife lens and moved on. I'm glad I did, because the long lenses were finally released, but they costaren't worth it; maybe 1/3 or 1/2 what they want. But, not for me. I looked at Sony, and did a lot of research, and finally decided I would have to use the lenses of other brands, so I decided to80D because I don't need the weather sealing or better build quality, so I decided to try the 77D, and so far, I'm happy. I haven't had much time to get to terms with it due to other circumstances, but I'vehave good kit, but I suspect it's very heavy. Here's what I decided on: Canon 10-18MM STM, Canon 40mm f2.8 STM, Canon 55-250mm (A very surprisingly sharp lens at $189 on Amazon) and a Canon 300mm f4L IS USM. The only heavy piece of gear is the 300mm, but I've walked with it for over 3 hours, using a wrist strap on the camera, and it was a piece of cake. I have much the same interests in photography as you, wildlife/nature, and it's always a compromise getting the right mix of kit. I decided against a zoom such as a 70-300mm because my experience with every brand, and I've tried most, is that from about 220-300, they aren't quite as sharp. I've tried them with/without IS, and with/without tripods, and from reading reviews and comments, most others find the same problem. I've only used the Canon 300mm f4 a few times, but imo the ancient IS system works far better for me than any Nikon I've used, and seems to match the latest Canon systems on my other lenses. With the crop factor it's a 485mm lens, and I did 2 years with 400mm, and found that I get close enough to wildlife with that focal length. I may get a 1.4 TC, but right now, I don't need it. Take a look at the weight of the lenses I've mentioned; 10-18mm 240g, 55-250mm 375g,, and the 40mm 2.8 almost nothing. I think that long Tamron is your nemesis, I'd keep the 80D and find something more comfortable for a long telephoto, but if you feel you need that focal length, you might not reduce the weight by much. If you go to MFT, look at the Panasonic 100-400mm, it's the only long lens of reasonable quality that is priced close to reasonable. I'm 72 btw, and I find the Canon kit I have is within a few ounces of what I'd get in a matching MFT kit.

Good luck.


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