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Should you get a DSLR


2 Nov 2012 11:54AM
I'm sorry I was under the impression you were looking for advice, I didn't realise you were an authority on the subject. Had you had images in your PF, I would no doubt have refrained from commenting, bowing to your undoubted ability.

I posted my opinion, hoping to start a discussion. Nobody is the an ultimate authority on any subject, and hence the benefits of discussions. Even if my photos were unimaginably good, (they definately arent) my opinion, would still be able more than open for discussion.
mdpontin 17 6.0k Scotland
2 Nov 2012 12:32PM
I think there can be a tendency to view a dSLR as being almost de rigueur if you're serious about photography, or perhaps simply if you wish to be seen to be a serious photographer. However, as this discussion shows, the question of whether or not a dSLR is the right choice depends on a number of variables, and is not necessarily the best way to go.
Steppenwolf 9 1.2k
2 Nov 2012 2:23PM

Quote:
One of the reasons I posted this originally is because I've read multiple threads where people have advised someone looking for a compact of some kind to go and get a DSLR. I think it was probably bad advice given the information they had. Blanket advising everyone to upgrade from a pocket compact doesn't make sense. Hence the post.



Ah, I get it. I was wondering what the point of the post was.

I actually agree that the blanket advice to buy a DSLR (which is not as prevalent here as it used to be) is not always good advice - and I agree that compacts can take great photographs. However they can't take a photo in bad light at more than ISO400 and they can't take a decent telephoto shot - the bridge cameras with long lens zooms are are cheap and convenient but simply don't compare to a good DSLR/SLT with a decent long lens. And you get "scene" modes on most DSLR/SLTs. I agree they can be very helpful (when you know what they do).

But the bottom line is that a compact cannot do what an interchangeable lens camera can do - and it probably never will.
User_Removed 17 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
2 Nov 2012 2:25PM
Blanket advice, from me, would be to learn how the camera works and what settings to use for what situations. So many people never progress beyond auto, getting better cameras and using them in auto makes a marginal difference but can make things worse especially if they get a dslr and can't use it.
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
2 Nov 2012 7:12PM

Quote:My conclusion would be: if you have no interest in photography other than the desire to take your camera out of your pocket and take reasonable photos, buy a compact


Are you posting on the right site, this one`s about photography Smile

Sold my dslr`s and switched to CSC`s.

My compact gets more use than my larger CSC`s, there getting pretty good these days with minimal shutter delays and up to 10 fps, and you can get above ISO 100 without worrying about noise Smile


Quote:Blanket advice, from me, would be to learn how the camera works and what settings to use for what situations. So many people never progress beyond auto, getting better cameras and using them in auto makes a marginal difference but can make things worse especially if they get a dslr and can't use it


Dead right, learn how to best use what you have.
3 Nov 2012 8:29AM

Quote:Are you posting on the right site, this one`s about photography


Appreciated, but the occasional person stops by asking about compacts.


Quote:Sold my dslr`s and switched to CSC`s


I read about that on other threads with great interest. I think I'll probably do the same at one point. Right now my budget doesn't really allow me to completely swap systems (because I don't have a budget). Maybe I'll just wait a few years until second hand OMDs are a bit more common (although it sounds like no one is ever going to sell one, they're all in love so much). Then again, I'm still not completely sold on the electronic viewfinder. I really like to watch stuff through my lens, people, events etc, I really like the fact that I can actually see people. Watching something on a screen is a bit different, however good the screen. I'd be worried I would feel less 'connected' to events in front of me. I don't think it would have any effect on my actual photography, but maybe just on my emotional reaction to photography and the photos I take.
keith selmes 17 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
3 Nov 2012 10:30AM

Quote:I would feel less 'connected' to events in front of me
that is not a bad way of describing what sometimes happens to me. Often, usually I suppose, the EVF is just a viewfinder and the E part isn't relevant, but sometimes the view in the EVF is quite different from the real scene, and it's worse than disconcerting.

On a side issue, I am finding the build quality on my DSLR is much better than my smaller cameras. It ought to be I suppose, as the new price would have been 2 or 3 times as much. It shows up frequently in diopter adjustment, which tends to shift on it's own on the smaller cameras, leading me to think the AF has stoppped working, or my eyes have gone very funny, followed by some fiddling with adjustment before taking the picture. More likely to happen with a pocket camera I suppose, but the M43 isn't usually in a pocket, it's just a looser adjuster. A minor point, perhaps not applicable to all models, but very annoying.
User_Removed 8 155 2 South Africa
3 Nov 2012 10:33AM

Quote:Watching something on a screen is a bit different, however good the screen. I'd be worried I would feel less 'connected' to events in front of me. I don't think it would have any effect on my actual photography, but maybe just on my emotional reaction to photography and the photos I take.


its funny that's how I feel about tripods and now that I have upgraded to a DSLR and using a viewfinder I think I may agree with you about the screen. Haven't put my camera on live view once and not missing it at all.
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
4 Nov 2012 1:12AM

Quote:Watching something on a screen is a bit different, however good the screen. I'd be worried I would feel less 'connected' to events in front of me. I don't think it would have any effect on my actual photography, but maybe just on my emotional reaction to photography and the photos I take


I`ve found the rear screen a little like the twin lens reflex experience Smile
Carabosse 18 41.5k 270 England
4 Nov 2012 11:55AM

Quote:I`ve found the rear screen a little like the twin lens reflex experience


Indeed, especially if it can tilt and the camera used at waist level............ useful for all those sneaky shots! Wink
JJGEE 16 7.9k 18 England
4 Nov 2012 12:01PM

Quote:twin lens reflex

Yesterday I saw a lady in Sheffield Park Garden using a Rolleiflex.

Quite a few people were admiring both the camera and the lady Wink
petebfrance 9 3.0k France
4 Nov 2012 12:02PM

Quote:I`ve found the rear screen a little like the twin lens reflex experience

But without the image moving in the opposite direction. I remember trying to photograph a moving train with my TLR - it was not successfull...
Carabosse 18 41.5k 270 England
4 Nov 2012 12:11PM
My mother had a Rolleiflex, when I was knee high to a grasshopper. I think a photo of me pretending to use it exists in an album somewhere. Smile
alggomas 16 20 United Kingdom
4 Nov 2012 3:28PM
It really depends on how far you want to go with photography as a hobby.

I would get a good bridge camera. This has an OPTICAL zoom range from say three to 28+. It has all the functions of a DSLR. I would not go further than 10/15 optical zoom.

You also do not have to change lenses and will give very good results. I have both and again I say it depends how far you want to go. If you are happy with the bridge camera why buy into something else?
Buying a DSLR will not make you a good photographer. Neither will buying the "best /expensive camera".
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
4 Nov 2012 8:12PM

Quote:Yesterday I saw a lady in Sheffield Park Garden using a Rolleiflex


A short while ago there was a thread with someboby showing an interest in medium format and was looking for suggestions.

I recommended a dinky Lubitel, think the poster said, I can`t be doing with a twin lens reflex, there too big Smile

2-p1010012.jpg


Here`s mine along side my x10 Smile

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