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Sigma 105mm on D60...?


mcgovernjon 11 138 United Kingdom
23 Apr 2009 12:39PM
Does the Sigma 105mm have autofocus on a Nikon D60? I know some lenses don't... Also, if it does not, is manual focus that much of a problem (I will be doing portrait as well as macro work with the lens)?

Thanks a lot

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Graywolf 13 1.0k United Kingdom
23 Apr 2009 1:18PM
I'm a Canon user so I don't know too much about Nikon cameras but I think some of the Nikons had autofocus issues with some lenses.

The Sigma 105 is a great Macro lens. The autofocus is very sluggish but to be honest, when using it for macro work I almost always use it in manual, I don't really ever use it for anything else and If I did, I'd probably still use in manual.

It makes a good portrait lens but if that is going to be the main use to which you put it, rather than macro work, then it might be worth looking at another optic, Sigma 50mmm f1.4, or the Sigma 24 - 70mm f2.8
mcgovernjon 11 138 United Kingdom
23 Apr 2009 1:27PM
I heard around 100mm was best for portraits because it is nearest to human vision...
Allyx 11 4
23 Apr 2009 1:28PM
No, the Sigma 105mm Macro requires a body with a built-in focus motor in order to autofocus. Manual focus is very easy, although you'll need to use your camera's electronic rangefinder to help you. When making portraits, it's pretty hard unless you use a tripod and your subject is motionless, especially if you use the lens wide open.

If you can stretch to it, you'd be better off with the Nikkor version which has AF-S and VR. It's much more expensive though!
Allyx 11 4
23 Apr 2009 1:37PM

Quote:I heard around 100mm was best for portraits because it is nearest to human vision...


It's nothing to do with "closest to human vision". It's all to do with perspective, and perspective is controlled by where you take the photograph from in relation to your subject. On a 35mm or full frame camera, a 105mm lens allows you to stand far enough away while filling the frame with your subject that you will get a flattering perspective. On a DX camera like the D60, your angle of view is divided by 1.5, which means that to stand at the same distance as you would with a full frame camera, you'd only need a 70mm lens. 105/1.5=70

Since the 50mm, 60mm and 85mm lenses aren't a million miles away from 70mm, you can see why they make popular portrait lenses on DX cameras. Of course, you can still use a 105mm lens or anything longer - you could stand a mile away and still get a flattering perspective. It's only when you get close to your subject that their nose starts looking bigger than it should, and their face looks fatter. There are no rules saying that is wrong, and plenty of people make portraits with short lenses - as long as they are going for that comedic/striking effect. If you want to take a picture of someone and make them look handsome or beautiful in the classic way, then the longer the lens, the better!
Coleslaw 14 13.4k 28 Wales
23 Apr 2009 1:40PM

Quote:Does the Sigma 105mm have autofocus on a Nikon D60?

No reason why not.
Coleslaw 14 13.4k 28 Wales
23 Apr 2009 1:48PM
I have just noticed D60 is identical to D40X. Now, I am not sure, Allyx might be right.
mcgovernjon 11 138 United Kingdom
23 Apr 2009 1:55PM
Thanks everyone
Scutter Plus
12 1.7k 6 United Kingdom
23 Apr 2009 2:00PM
I wouldn't get too wound up about the autofocus. The manual focus ring is nice and large and easy to use and is about 3/4 of a full turn from stop to stop.
Its an excellent lens and one that will probably outlast your D60 in any case (I'm not sure either re the motor issue)!
23 Apr 2009 2:38PM
The Sigma 105mm works fine with my Nikon D50. So should be OK with D60.

Write to Nikon and/or Sigma to get their answer on the matter. JNC
Allyx 11 4
23 Apr 2009 2:50PM

Quote:The Sigma 105mm works fine with my Nikon D50. So should be OK with D60.

Write to Nikon and/or Sigma to get their answer on the matter. JNC



Or, don't bother since I provided the answer. I have the older Sigma 105mm (pre-DG) for use on my cameras, primary of which is a D200. The Sigma is screw driven. Since I know that an in-lens focus motor wasn't added to the DG version (and I confirmed it at Sigma's website), then we know that the DG version requires a body focus motor. We also know that the D60 lacks a body focus motor, and therefore supports autofocus only on lenses which have their own focus motor - AF-S and AF-I lenses. Other Nikon bodies which lack a built-in focus motor are the D40 and D40x and the new D5000. The D50 DOES have an in-body focus motor, which is why it can autofocus with this lens.

Nikon's policy is to eliminate the in-body focus motor from new lower-end SLR cameras, as they are designing all modern lenses with their own focus motors. Having a duplicate in-body motor increases weight, size and cost, all of which can only be justified on higher-end bodies whose owners are more likely to own a collection of older screw-driven AF lenses. The higher end you go, the more support there is for older lenses. For example, you need a D300-class body or above in order to meter with older non-CPU lenses. It's unlikely that entry-level SLR buyers will have any of these older AI lenses.
cambirder 16 7.2k England
23 Apr 2009 5:06PM
Just don't expect AF to work very well for macro work.

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