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So disappointed at my first wet-clean attempt


Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
29 Dec 2014 4:09AM
Hi, Folks.

I have a Pentax *ist DL. The sensor was filthy, so I decided to clean it. After much research, I decided to start with the least invasive, working my way towards a wet clean if necessary. My first step was to use a blower to attempt to remove just and fibres. Didn't work that well. Then I tried the Dust Aid Adhesive Strips. Didn't do too much. Then I finally tried the Dust Wand (wet method) technique. I actually repeated that technique several times, and my sensor is still a mess!! (See picture).

Does anyone have any advice to help me get a truly clean sensor? I'd rather not send it away if possible as it is very expensive here in New Zealand, also, I don't want to have to send it away every time some dust gets on the sensor.

Thanks in advance for any replies. Smile

17376_1419825997.jpg
dcash29 15 2.4k England
29 Dec 2014 9:22AM
Not the best example to demonstrate, although I personally wouldn't use a blower or adhesive strips.

Ive used 'sensor swabs' with success
StuartAt 16 1.1k 8 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 9:27AM
Just for clarity (I'm an interested observer), has the wet clean made the situation worse or just failed to make it better?
MikeA 16 1.3k England
29 Dec 2014 9:29AM
Sensor swabs, butterfly, plenty of practice and patience.
paulbroad 13 131 1293 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 10:10AM
Oh dear. I suspect you may have made things rather worse. The best advice is to not get dirt on the sensor in the first place. Never leave the camera without a lens or cover attached for more than a second. Never change lenses in dirty or windy conditions. Keep lens rear ends clean. Etc.

A bit late for that.

I use an Artic Butterfly anti static brush, but have rarely needed to use it. (About 45 in UK) Possibly 4 times on my ancient EOS 20D. once on my 40D and so far, not at all on my early 7D.

No help, I know, but prevention is the best bet. I fear you need a professional clean, then you may have done permanent damage. The low pass filter is rather delicate. You will need to pay, then, if all is well, be very careful.

Paul
collywobles 17 4.1k 10 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 10:20AM

Quote: Never leave the camera without a lens


Quote:
No help, I know, but prevention is the best



Great advice, I have zoom lenses on my cameras for this reason, 17-40 on one and 28-200 on my other, I very very rarely take a lens off.

I have cleaned the sensor once or twice and I found it takes several goes to get it really clean, checking it every time by taking photos of a plain white background and reviewing the image on a PC each time, repeating this process until there are no blemishes left.
mikehit 11 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 11:02AM

Quote:The low pass filter is rather delicate.

As far as I know the low pass filter is glass and the only think you need to worry about is scratching it if it is grit you have on the sensor (note that you are not cleaning the sensor itself, just the filter that lies on top of it).


I would only use wet cleaning as a last resort - sometimes applying solutions to dust can turn them to sticky mush and if you don't use the properly can make matters worse especially if you use excess fluid which can leave smear marks.
This article describes the options on cleaning: http://www.eos-magazine.com/articles/cleaning/partone.html
Have you used a loupe to inspect the sensor after each stage of cleaning it? This will greatly reduce the frustration of repeat cycles of clean-fire up-shoot-look at picture-lens off-clean etc


The furthest I have gone with cleaning is using a sensorpen which I found cleaned some quite stubborn marks:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lenspen-SensorKlear-Angled-Sensor-Cleaning/dp/B001QUIEIS

mikehit 11 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 11:04AM
Here is one option




HUFC 7 1.0k United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 11:20AM
I Thought It Was My Sensor But It Turned Out To Be Dust Inside My Lens, Just A Thought
MikeA 16 1.3k England
29 Dec 2014 11:52AM
If following the above video remember to remove the batteries from the camera before immersing in water.
LOL.
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
29 Dec 2014 11:53AM

Quote:Just for clarity (I'm an interested observer), has the wet clean made the situation worse or just failed to make it better?


Definitely not made it worse. But there has been little, if any, improvement. 😞
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
29 Dec 2014 12:01PM

Quote:Oh dear. I suspect you may have made things rather worse. The best advice is to not get dirt on the sensor in the first place. Never leave the camera without a lens or cover attached for more than a second. Never change lenses in dirty or windy conditions. Keep lens rear ends clean. Etc.
Paul



Hi, Paul. Not sure why you have reached the conclusion that I have made things worse? Could you explain, please.

It has always been my practise to keep a cover or lens on my camera body. I would never leave it exposed. The camera is around ten years old now, and I have avoided cleaning it up until this point. I understand and follow all the well-known prevention methods. Alas, perhaps I simply live in a rather dusty environment (I consider NZ to be a fairly dusty place, especially considering I can only go two or three days max between dusting furniture!).

Thanks for your reply.
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
29 Dec 2014 12:04PM

Quote:
Great advice, I have zoom lenses on my cameras for this reason, 17-40 on one and 28-200 on my other, I very very rarely take a lens off.



Now, THAT'S a great idea! I only have two lenses, so perhaps having two bodies with lenses attached would prevent this happening in the future. Definitely something to think about.
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
29 Dec 2014 12:07PM

Quote:
Quote:The low pass filter is rather delicate.

As far as I know the low pass filter is glass and the only think you need to worry about is scratching it if it is grit you have on the sensor (note that you are not cleaning the sensor itself, just the filter that lies on top of it).

The furthest I have gone with cleaning is using a sensorpen which I found cleaned some quite stubborn marks:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lenspen-SensorKlear-Angled-Sensor-Cleaning/dp/B001QUIEIS



Hi. ☺
I have the lens pen. Didn't know they put out a sensor pen, too. Interesting. And thanks for the link. No, I don't have a loupe. I have a magnifying glass and a spotlight...... neither of which was terribly helpful in the process. 😞
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
29 Dec 2014 12:10PM

Quote:I Thought It Was My Sensor But It Turned Out To Be Dust Inside My Lens, Just A Thought


Thanks. I'll keep an eye out for that.

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