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So disappointed at my first wet-clean attempt


Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
29 Dec 2014 12:15PM

Quote:If following the above video remember to remove the batteries from the camera before immersing in water.
LOL.


Quote:If following the above video remember to remove the batteries from the camera before immersing in water.
LOL.



Thanks, Mike. Just as well you mentioned removal of the battery. I never would have thought about that.... duh! Will let you know how it turns out. Probably be the method that actually works....the cheapest, too. ☺
Nick_w 13 4.3k 99 England
29 Dec 2014 12:44PM
Theres nothing really to worry about, just use swabs with the solution sparingly. Do it systematically work from side to side zig zagging your way down. Then up and down working your way across.

You may have to repeat for persistent bunnies. As for dust in the lens, are you sure? its very unlikely these will project onto the sensor as distinct spots rather a fuzzy loss of contrast. (it needs to be on the focal length of the lens to project a distant mark).

Also the advice about never changing the lens? - well you might as well get a fixed lens camera then rather than a dSLR
Chrism8 14 982 28 England
29 Dec 2014 1:05PM

Quote:Theres nothing really to worry about, just use swabs with the solution sparingly. Do it systematically work from side to side zig zagging your way down. Then up and down working your way across.


I've always purchased swabs almost the width of the sensor, a dab of solution on the swab, sweep one way, and back using the other side to dry off and discard.
PRC 6 301 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 3:19PM
Hi

I've cleaned sensors a limited number of times. I use swabs and Eclipse fluid from Just Ltd and they advise to make sure you use swabs that are the correct size for the sensor (see here) and to do one swipe in each direction, using one side of the swab for each swipe. As long as you follow the instructions for getting at the sensor and the instructions with the cleaning kit (and make sure you're in a relatively clean environment) it should be ok.

I've just cleaned my daughter's Pentax's sensor and that took two goes at it.

Philip
lemmy 14 2.9k United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 7:26PM
Any zoom lens that trombones tends to suck dirt into the system, whether the lens is removed or not.

I had some very, very persistent dust (I'm pretty sure it was pollen, actually) on the sensor of a GH3. Nothing would shift it so I just kept on cleaning it quite hard with swabs. It eventually went but it's not for the faint hearted.

Of course, it isn't the dust itself you are seeing but its shadow on the sensor. Shooting at wide apertures minimizes the problem but dirt on sensors is inevitable, no matter what precautions you take. Any one who thinks they have avoided it altogether, photograph a clean white wall or clear blue sky at f22.

I once convinced a client that sea spray on my lens, which and given a hazy effect, was a filter I had used. Maybe someone could say that spots on their shots were a nod in the direction of Damien Hirst Grin
paulbroad 13 131 1293 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 7:30PM
Dust in the lens will give a different effect to sensor dust. Just do an exposure test with a different lens.

The low pass filter is actually a multi layer composite. It will probably have a fluorine surface coating and will damage if you have grit present and/or are a bit keen with the cleaning. You must not rub. The reason I wondered if you had made things worse is that you CAN damage the surface of the low pass filter. Once you have done that, you are in trouble.

You use air, a soft anti static brush, or, as a last resort, a wet dabbing motion, but not a rubbing motion.

Some modern DSLR do not have such filters. Medium format digital and, I think, most CSC do not have the filter. That improves sensor performance, but means you would actually be cleaning the sensor surface!

Paul
mikehit 11 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
29 Dec 2014 8:44PM

Quote:That improves sensor performance, but means you would actually be cleaning the sensor surface!

Paul



Nope. It still has an infra-red filter over the surface of the sensor - and as far as I am aware even that is covered by 'non-low-pass-filter' layer of glass to protect it.
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
29 Dec 2014 10:05PM

Quote:I once convinced a client that sea spray on my lens, which and given a hazy effect, was a filter I had used. Maybe someone could say that spots on their shots were a nod in the direction of Damien Hirst Grin


Haha. You must be quite the salesman!
Mike_Smith Plus
13 760 2 United Kingdom
31 Dec 2014 10:08PM
This is what i used, it really did help with having the Loupe with the lights to magnify what i was looking at.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/LensPen-SensorKlear-Loupe-Kit-SKLK-1/dp/B003CZ5W1M/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1420063475&sr=1-2&keywords=lenspen+loupe+kit
lemmy 14 2.9k United Kingdom
31 Dec 2014 10:51PM

Quote:you must be quite the salesman

Desperation probably covers it best.!
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
2 Jan 2015 2:26AM

Quote:I had some very, very persistent dust (I'm pretty sure it was pollen, actually) on the sensor of a GH3. Nothing would shift it so I just kept on cleaning it quite hard with swabs. It eventually went but it's not for the faint hearted.



Hi again, Lemmy.

I've cleaned it with the Dust Wand (correct size for my sensor) probably six times now, but it hasn't moved even ONE of those dust spots!! Not sure what's going on, but I have decided to send it away to get it done by the 'experts'. At least if they fluff it, it will be covered by insurance. Once it's clean, I am going to clean it much more often. Hopefully that will keep it from getting into such a state again??!!
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
2 Jan 2015 2:29AM

Quote:This is what i used, it really did help with having the Loupe with the lights to magnify what i was looking at.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/LensPen-SensorKlear-Loupe-Kit-SKLK-1/dp/B003CZ5W1M/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1420063475&sr=1-2&keywords=lenspen+loupe+kit



That looks like a good kit, Mike. If I have to invest in any more cleaning products, I would definitude consider that one.
discreetphoton Plus
16 3.5k 20 United Kingdom
2 Jan 2015 6:08PM
Three words: eyelead sensor stick.
lemmy 14 2.9k United Kingdom
2 Jan 2015 8:29PM

Quote:Sensor swabs, butterfly, plenty of practice and patience.
There is nothing very frightening about cleaning a sensor if you listen to that advice. I don't clean my sensors very often because I rarely stop a lens down enough to see the dust. I had pollen on the sensor ones, almost glues itself on. I just wet swabbed until it had gone.

The glass covering the sensor is not so delicate that a wet swab will scratch it. It's all common sense really. I ceased to worry about cleaning my own sensors when I was with a Nikon appointed guy who did it. He didn't do anything I couldn't.

He also told me that if you saw some of the people who do the cleaning in shops, you'd prefer to do it yourself.
Acoustics4me 17 30 New Zealand
3 Jan 2015 8:48AM

Quote:Three words: eyelead sensor stick.


Yeah, I saw a YouTube demonstration video on that. It looked very good, but after I did a little more research on it, I read that some people who used it noticed it had removed a little of the film that is on some sensors? That put me off a bit.

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