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Studio Flash


FatBoyfocus 12 75 4 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2009 8:25AM
Morning all

I seem to struggle to get nice clear images when shooting some body scapes. It's either too grany or, not enough light.
I have an interfit EX150 studio kit.
Where to start from please. How far would you recommend the lights to be from the subject and with what aperture or Shutter speed?

Many Thanks again Smile
Riaan
Henchard 16 2.7k 1 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2009 8:31AM
FatBoyfocus 12 75 4 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2009 8:37AM
Thx Grin
Pete 20 18.8k 97 England
8 Oct 2009 8:43AM
The guides John's linked to cover just about every studio question asked, but here's a quick reply to your specific question.
As you shoot digital it's going to be easier to set up because you can do tests shots and use your camera's LCD preview to view the test.
The shutter speed can be any speed lower than the flash sync of the camera. This will be in the instruction manual. If you're not sure set 1/125sec.
Then the aperture is dependent on the flash to subject distance and anything you put in front of the flash to modify the light, such as a brolly, diffuser or a softbox. Set f/8 first. If the shot is too dark either move the light forward or set a wider aperture f/5.6 etc. If the shot is too light move the flash further back or set a smaller aperture f/11 etc.
miked70 12 225 3 South Africa
8 Oct 2009 9:16AM
My setup iso lowest,f8 shutter 1/80 wb to flash the closer the light the stronger the lines(shape)i use a softbox umbrella just throw light around barn doors work well honeycomb as well you need to control the light and put it were you need it i shoot very close to the lights stops fall off under 1/2 a meter if you can not afjust your lights change the size of softbox use black cloth to make it smaller as you mover it away.for full length i use a 1 by 2 meter.
hope this helps.
just had a look at kit i think you need another softbox and use them together to give you on light at 300w on same tripod use clamp the 60x60 is fine for 3/4 shot.
DannyLenihan 13 213 19 England
13 Oct 2009 12:02PM

Quote:The guides John's linked to cover just about every studio question asked, but here's a quick reply to your specific question.
As you shoot digital it's going to be easier to set up because you can do tests shots and use your camera's LCD preview to view the test.
The shutter speed can be any speed lower than the flash sync of the camera. This will be in the instruction manual. If you're not sure set 1/125sec.
Then the aperture is dependent on the flash to subject distance and anything you put in front of the flash to modify the light, such as a brolly, diffuser or a softbox. Set f/8 first. If the shot is too dark either move the light forward or set a wider aperture f/5.6 etc. If the shot is too light move the flash further back or set a smaller aperture f/11 etc.



I hate disagreeing with Pete - but I'm going to anyway, and then I'm going to email him a manly hug...

When you're using studio lighting you set the lights up to match your camera, not the other way round. It's like the opposite of shooting in natural light.

Changing the aperture changes an intrinsic elemental of the image - the depth of field.

In the instance where your image is too bright, you would be better to either turn down the lights where possible, or lower your ISO. The opposite should occur if the image is too bright.

If you are struggling to get enough light, and uprating the ISO is causing grainy or noisy pictures, then you have a couple of options:

1: Ingenomic do a plugin filter for Photoshop that virtually eliminates noise with no visible loss to the image.

2: You need more powerful lights.

The EX150's are OK starter lights, but not really powerful enough for anything more than head and shoulders shots, except if you are using a very fast lens and require a shallow depth of field.
alan h. 19 275 United Kingdom
15 Oct 2009 4:03PM
i have two studio flashes which i have never used with a digital camera, i am now keen to try it out with my cannon 400d camera,i have bought a hot shoe adaptor and would liketo know the next steps in the procedure, thanking you in anticipation ,alan h
twodoctors 11 21 United Kingdom
16 Oct 2009 10:39AM
Well, you just plug the camera to the lights and start taking photos...

...how you set the lights up will depend on what effect you are trying to achieve. Consider a (set of) wireless trigger.

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