GB Sports Photographer & The Panasonic LUMIX S1

The effects of image consumption


miptog 14 3.6k 63 United Kingdom
7 Feb 2019 11:29AM

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Tianshi_angie 4 2.6k England
7 Feb 2019 11:57AM
I think one of the comments after the article has a very valid point - that people like Rankin are to blame for the preponderance of celeb type photos. I don't know enough about Rankin to know if he is actually guilty of tweaking his photos to make people slimmer, no blemishes, have 'bee-sting' lips and large eyes but there are certainly enough of these in Photographic magazines and the media to create a trend for 'looking like them'. I stopped subscribing to one Photographic magazine because of their use of insanely thin models (btw I noticed over Christmas that the models advertising, in particular Chanel, perfume were also insanely thin). I did remonstrate with one of my granddaughters when she pouted to take a selfie saying that I thought she looked quite silly and she looked far better in a normal photo.
JackAllTog Plus
10 5.7k 58 United Kingdom
7 Feb 2019 1:39PM
We always want to 'put our best foot forward' so the same goes for images. However, for some, the thirst for positive social stranger feedback is all consuming (and sometimes well paying). The trick is to do lots of different things so you are not reliant on such a fickle source of feedback.
Ross_D Plus
5 838 1 United Kingdom
8 Feb 2019 8:00AM
I blame Portrait Pro Wink
dark_lord Plus
15 2.3k 591 England
8 Feb 2019 9:55AM
Those 'filtered' images just look wrong and distorted. Closer to looking like popularly portrayed aliens.
keith selmes 16 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
8 Feb 2019 11:23AM
I'm not sure if "selfie-harm" is the right title, when " a majority of the subjects said they actually preferred their original portraits ". The portraits were damaged by software, I'm not sure the teenagers are. I mean, they're given the software, they fool around to see how they could look, and they prefer how they do look. Might be concerned about the minority who didn't prefer the original.
Dave_Canon 13 1.6k United Kingdom
8 Feb 2019 11:24AM
You cannot blame Rankin or Portrait Pro. This started in the Hollywood era of the 1920's and 1930's. The photographic plates of Hollywood stars were then given to teams of skilled re-touchers using brushes to create a heavily stylised final image. A professional portrait photographer recently told me that the industry would never consider going that far now as it was considered unacceptable. He himself had learnt a lesson many years earlier when a mature lady commissioned him to produce a portrait of her. He felt it appropriate to reduce her wrinkles etc. as she seemed to be more well worn than average. When shown the photograph, she was very disappointed and said that is not me. She explained that she had spent much of her life walking in the Himalayas and Andes and was well aware that the exposure to sun and weather had aged her face but she said that was part of who she was and her friends and relatives would not recognise her either. The professional apologised and produced another print with almost no editing for which she was pleased. When he was demonstrating portrait work (after he had retired), I noticed that he used Portrait Pro a couple of times. He explained that he never used it as a professional but believes that he would have but only to save time but also with minimal changes.


Dave
keith selmes 16 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
8 Feb 2019 11:39AM
petebfrance 7 2.8k France
8 Feb 2019 5:15PM
It's a big change from the 'old days' of film, when most family snapshots were printed small and the amount of detail was pretty low. Now photos shown on the screen regularly show details or pores / spots / blemishes, and these of course can be seen in all their glory, zoomed in on.... We don't usually scrutinize people that closely, in fact if we did I think it would be considered positively rude! In my portrait painting days (long gone) I was fully aware of this - it's no use playing 'count the wrinkles' (yes, I know it's a popular photographic hobby, 'shows character' and all that), just capture the impression of a live person rather than a detailed map - but unfortunately this detailed map is what is what you get unless you are careful - lots of megabytes of it too! It's now wonder people become self-conscious.
I've seen the occasional one of my face - very disturbing, but, of course, SWMBO is short-sighted.
keith selmes 16 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
8 Feb 2019 9:53PM

Quote:SWMBO is short-sighted
Interesting point. First time I had reading glasses, I was very startled the first time an attractive young woman stood too close, every detail on her magnified face sharply visible. On the other hand, out of focus, say 6 to 10 feet away, was quite pleasantly soft, and older ladies were much improved.
petebfrance 7 2.8k France
9 Feb 2019 1:24PM

Quote:
Quote:SWMBO is short-sighted
Interesting point. First time I had reading glasses, I was very startled the first time an attractive young woman stood too close, every detail on her magnified face sharply visible. On the other hand, out of focus, say 6 to 10 feet away, was quite pleasantly soft, and older ladies were much improved.


The downside with short-sightedness in this situation is that she can see fine detail close-up - she takes her glasses off and reads extremely small print, built in macro eyes! At least being long-sighted the closer people get the less the details stand out.
Incidentally, on the subject of spectacles, I finally got some 'distance' glasses. They don't make any difference at al at any real long distance, but a few feet away (I suppose 'middle distance') things have become clearer. Good for television but now I have to tone down the sharpness. I hate having the things, though - I've started the 'where are my glasses' syndrome, almost as difficult as socks to track down.
chavender Plus
8 403 1 France
10 Feb 2019 9:49AM
Being a long time glasses wearer with bifocals I never had to worry about separate reading glasses but following a cataract operation on both eyes a year or so ago, I still needed glasses for reading, computer work etc.
I have now solved the "where did I leave my glasses" problem by buying about a dozen pairs of the cheap off the shelf reading glasses and spreading them over the house.


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