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The Film Camera Debate


pablophotographer 6 770 291
26 Feb 2016 3:04PM

Quote:I'm considering using my camera:

this winter because the weather is usually wet and miserable and this one is designed to stand up to that. I could, I guess, buy a weather-proof digital but they are quite expensive and I rather fancy using this again - it was something of a favourite of mine. (The Kyocera T5 with a Zeiss lens 35m automatic film camera
Things I'm not sure about are:
- film. Miserable, damp weather needs fairly fast film (max aperture only f3.5) and my memories of ISO 400 and 800 film are of pretty awful grain - or have they improved? Thinking of using colour, but could be tempted by B& W.
- processing.
Any advice, thoughts, please?

I would try to put my hands on 400ISO film colour or black and white Kodak still has Kodak Ultra Max 400ISO which has a fine grain and you are lucky to find stock of the BW400CN Kodak Professional film or try the Ilford XP2 400SO All of these are developed by C41 process and they can be processed by a pharmacy lab or in a supermarket, I hope Carrefour still process film in their stores. I thought I had seen somewhere you mentioned you got a digital camera though, I hope it all goes well.

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petebfrance 5 2.4k France
26 Feb 2016 3:25PM

Quote:
Quote:I'm considering using my camera:

this winter because the weather is usually wet and miserable and this one is designed to stand up to that. -


I would try to put my hands on 400ISO film colour or black and white Kodak still has Kodak Ultra Max 400ISO which has a fine grain and you are lucky to find stock of the BW400CN Kodak Professional film or try the Ilford XP2 400SO All of these are developed by C41 process and they can be processed by a pharmacy lab or in a supermarket, I hope Carrefour still process film in their stores. I thought I had seen somewhere you mentioned you got a digital camera though, I hope it all goes well.


Hi; thank-you for your response. As mentioned a while ago (probably a few pages back now), having checked prices, availability and so on I decided not to use the Yashica T4 and instead bought a weather resistant Pentax DSLR (K50) at a rather attractive price. It doesn't slip into the pocket, sadly, but is really great to use - also brings new life to my old lensesWink
Yes, there is a Carrefour in Quimper that does processing, but options on the size of digitised versions are very limited. I did find some others who were a bit more hopeful, but after a few sums the Pentax was more attractive.
regards
Pete
Lenscapon 1 64
26 Feb 2016 9:56PM
I missed the feeling of direct control I had with my old film dslr complete with lenses sporting an aperture rings, but didn't miss the smell of fixer and the red lit darkroom.

But switching to Fuji with their 'proper' controls stopped me going back to the dark side of pungent chemicals and furtive visits to obscure chemist shops to collect paper envelopes.
9 Nov 2016 11:48PM
I still own a Bronica S2 (from the 1960's) with a superb Nikkor 90mm lens. It uses 120 roll film and shoots 6x6.

I used it a few weeks ago. My Canon 6D was relegated to the role of spot meter Smile

It's a culture shock, going back again. Only 12 frames per roll, a very complicated film loading procedure, although I do have spare back for it, and everything is slow, considered and you really think before hitting the shutter.

I used Pan F and to be honest, it still felt good to use it and to develop those negatives myself. Nostalgia. But the slowing down part is useful in its own right.
keith selmes 13 7.2k 1 United Kingdom
10 Nov 2016 8:15AM
I've recently had a few sessions with an MPP Microtechnical. I seem to get in the mood for this a couple of weeks each year. And I tend to agree with Ed Weston "Anything more than 500 yards from the car just isn't really photogenic". Smile Sometimes a digital camera is useful for scouting locations.
RamblinSam 3 31 United Kingdom
11 Jan 2017 11:40AM
There is something rather satisfying or frustrating about using film; you either enjoy or miss the option of seeing what your images are like before you get the film processed. My Dynax 9, is a wonderful beast, but sometimes I get the urge if I have the time, (and 'time' you definitely need!) to go out and use my 1909 Sanderson Junior plate camera with Direct Positive paper ... The 'speed' of this material, is only about 4-6 ASA, but it's a darn sight cheaper and easier to purchase than actual film stock!
11 Jan 2017 3:48PM
I'm a great fan of film. I like the hands on thing - loading film, developing film, printing the image in the darkroom and at the end of the day working harder to get what I usually see as a better image. I like the input into my pictures and the complete frustrations when things don't go according to plan! Nothing like poor exposure to screw up the system!

Nice to see Kodak rebooting some films - so I can't be the only "nutter".

Love the character of my old Nikons and the medium format Pentax 67 which is so affordable and so much more interesting than shooting everything on 35mm format which most of us have to do now with the new technology.

My FE 2 is now used by my daughter who thinks it is "the business". I have just started running with a Contax G1 which gives the crispest and cleanest of results. So much more to explore!!
Evertonian 4 729 England
11 Jan 2017 3:58PM
Well I used to do all that - and also with Nikons but my favourite gear was my 6x4.5 Mamiya equipment.

Where we differ is that I much prefer doing my processing in my old study now rather than being cut off in my darkroom ( an extension adjoining but outsdide the house) where I was away from all the family and hadn't installed a telephone (I don't know why as it was and still is so easy). It is much nicer to be in contact even if only for the odd cup of coffee to be brought to me. In the darkroom, I had to cover things up or put them in drawers then open the door for the minimum of space for the mug to be passed in to me. I know what I like owin.
franken Plus
14 4.2k 4 United Kingdom
12 Jan 2017 7:32PM
I began using and processing film in my mid teens(50 odd years ago) and enjoyed the experience for many decades.

I did a bit of part time freelance work in the 70's and by then I'd fully understood both print and slide film and processed both.

I went fully digital in about 2005 although I still use a camera like it was a film one. Mostly shoot in aperture priority and seldom machine gun several frames in one go.

Both are enjoyable. I was recently asked if I'd ever go back to film and my answer was that I'd have to do the full process, ie, a wet darkroom as I can't see the point in shooting film and then turning the result into a digital file.

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