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The longevity of the modern DSLR?


youmightlikethis Avatar
13 Jun 2020 6:29AM
how long would you expect a dslr to last before showing faults [excluding shutter faults]
justin c Avatar
justin c 19 5.2k 36 England
13 Jun 2020 7:24AM
How long is a piece of string. It would surely depend on how much the camera is used, how it's looked after, etc. etc. A camera can develop a fault within 5 minutes or 50 years, who knows. I wouldn't worry about it, just use it and enjoy it.
LenShepherd Avatar
LenShepherd 15 4.7k United Kingdom
13 Jun 2020 10:05AM
Adding to the Justin C's comment with only a few thousand shots a year and careful use I consider a reasonable life not less than 10 years.

After 10 years a DSLR, while still able to take images as good as when new, will be some way behind specification levels 10 years after it was new.

Dave_Canon Avatar
Dave_Canon 17 2.2k United Kingdom
13 Jun 2020 11:01AM
The manufacturer may well know the reliability of their product and thus MTBF. Based on my limited experience with 3 DSLR's, none of them exhibited any faults. If we exclude the mechanical shutter then the electronics is likely to last at least 10 to 20 years before something shakes lose. My oldest DSLR is now 15 years old and was converted to Infrared. I hope that this will continue for many years as I do not plan to convert another DSLR.

Dave
thewilliam2 Avatar
thewilliam2 6 1.7k United Kingdom
13 Jun 2020 4:31PM
Friends who operate busy portrait studios have found that DSLR cameras are very long-lived. The Kodak DCS760, which is a "digitalised" Nikon D5 has proved good for a million actuations and many "proper" single-digit Nikon DSLR bodies have been as long-lived.

Much will depend on how the camera is treated. Studio use will probably include being dropped from time to time but it stays dry.
Railcam Avatar
Railcam 16 967 2 Scotland
14 Jun 2020 8:31AM
[quoteThe Kodak DCS760, which is a "digitalised" Nikon D5 ]


A slight typo I think. the Kodak used the F5 body. No criticism, just a correction.
thewilliam2 Avatar
thewilliam2 6 1.7k United Kingdom
14 Jun 2020 10:22AM

Quote:[quoteThe Kodak DCS760, which is a "digitalised" Nikon D5 ]


A slight typo I think. the Kodak used the F5 body. No criticism, just a correction.


Mea culpa! I used the DCS760 for about 6 years.
Canonshots Avatar
Canonshots 13 206 13 United Kingdom
14 Jun 2020 6:08PM
I have now owned two Canon DSLRs, an EOS300D and an EOS7D. The 300D was faulty from new - autofocus did not work except in auto mode. I soon got a replacement which still functions OK after 13 years. Nothing has ever gone wrong with my 7D (touch wood).
pink Avatar
pink Plus
20 7.4k 11 England
15 Jun 2020 6:50AM
Also had Canon DSLR's right from the 20D, my 40D had a new shutter but it had done over 250k actuations so expected. My20D expired when the tripod fell with it attached to a 500mm f4 prime lens, the shock ripped the front off the camera and the lens only had a scratch.
All my cameras are subjected to extreme weather but I always look after them after each outing with a good clean.
As mentioned above the only reason to upgrade/replace is the advancement of technology, mainly less noise and more dynamic range for me, not so bothered about all the fancy bits as I seldom use them.
Ian
Petros55 Avatar
Petros55 16 5 Scotland
15 Jun 2020 10:43AM
I use a Canon 40D which I bought second hand around 8 years ago, so far never let me down. I was checking out second hand 5Dís yesterday and came across a couple for sale which had up to 250K actuations, still being sold by a dealer with warranty.
Dave_Canon Avatar
Dave_Canon 17 2.2k United Kingdom
15 Jun 2020 12:39PM
One of the reasons why I do not buy second hand is that I doubt I have used any where near 250,000 actuations total for all the cameras I have ever owned. The only DSLR I traded in had 15,000 actuations over 6 years use. I can understand that a professional or equipment used by professionals might be subjected to so many actuations but difficult to see how an amateur enthusiast could take so many shots. I probably take just over 3,000 shots a year (across all cameras) on average but much lower in the last 12 months.

Dave
petebfrance Avatar
15 Jun 2020 2:21PM
As far as longevity is concerned, my Pentax K50 last about 4 years (and about 4,000 shots) before it succumbed to the dreaded aperture block failure. The problem is apparently due to a solenoid (or something of that nature) the production of which had been moved from Japan to China when, or about the time that the K30 was introduced.
Now, not all K50s fail that quickly, some fail earlier, some later and some not at all.

The camera can be used with manual lenses by setting the aperture on the lens, but of course many lenses do not have aperture rings. Currently (no pun intended), using AA batteries with a battery insert helps and makes the aperture block function (why?), although the first few frames are always dark because it takes a while to get things moving.
Unfortunately, the same part with some 'ongoing improvements' is still used on the entry-level Pentax which means there is potential for failure on K30, K50, KS1, KS2 and K70 (yes, including the K70 - I know of one from 'another forum', and I believe that there is no possibility of using AA batteries with this model)

Very disappointing.

I was hesitant to post this, 'brand loyalty' and all that ****, but as EPZ have recently put a couple of these models as recommendations I thought this was a good thing to do. Incidentally, no problems like this have been reported (to my knowledge) with the other Pentax models, KP, K5, K3, K1 etc. which use a different mechanism and are apparently much more robust, just the entry-level models.
pink Avatar
pink Plus
20 7.4k 11 England
15 Jun 2020 4:24PM
When shooting motorsport on assignment it is quite easy to notch up 5000 shots over a weekend, multiply this by 30+ weekends/events in a year and you can see how easy it is to get to a high shutter count.
Also long haul trips for pleasure for 3-4 weeks can also add dramatically to the tally, 4 weeks in new zealand was about 7000 images taken (all crap!)
thewilliam2 Avatar
thewilliam2 6 1.7k United Kingdom
15 Jun 2020 5:07PM
[quote Incidentally, no problems like this have been reported (to my knowledge) with the other Pentax models, KP, K5, K3, K1 etc. which use a different mechanism and are apparently much more robust, just the entry-level models.


Don't manufacturers need to give a little something extra to those who pay more than the cost of the entry-level model?
keith selmes Avatar
keith selmes 19 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
15 Jun 2020 7:17PM
My Eos 5D must be 10 years plus now, and it still works. Bits are held on by gaffer tape, and I've had the same thing with Panasonic mirrorless, they're more likely to wear out on hinges, covers, eyepieces etc. or get smacked in a drop or drowned. Actually the GH1 survived submersion, after a long drying out rest. The lens unfortunately, although it works after drying out, had mud inside and is still a bit hazy.

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