The photography echo chamber.


altitude50 Plus
14 13.8k United Kingdom
8 Jan 2019 2:12PM
Personally I do not like beige animals on beige and grey animals on grey backgrounds. Unless the animal is doing something very interesting. I have seen enough images of lions sleeping in the yellow grass and grey elephants in mud to last me several lifetimes. However, camera club judges seem to value them above almost anything else. Noticeable that the judge's body language changes fro mildly bored to quite excited. !0/10 every time.

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dudler Plus
15 752 1437 England
8 Jan 2019 4:03PM
And to quote John Cleese in a spoof documentary about Venice that did the rounds in the Eighties, 'More f*$£ing gondolas'?

Digital Rev TV is possibly not watched enough - Kai brings a degree of disrespect to things that is badly needed.

And bloody Venetian masks.
Ross_D Plus
4 800 1 United Kingdom
8 Jan 2019 6:55PM

Quote:And bloody Venetian masks.


Actually, a Venetian mask covered in blood would make for an interesting image Wink
What- Death in Venice?

Just seen all those birds and gassy water round piers that have gone up today.

I couldn't resist adding a cliche today, how many votes will it get?
saltireblue Plus
8 8.8k 35 Norway
8 Jan 2019 7:46PM

Quote:Just seen all those birds and gassy water round piers that have gone up today.

I couldn't resist adding a cliche today, how many votes will it get?


I couldn't resist, either...I'll get my coat...
Well, I've already lost tonight's game of 'Pointless' it would seem.
MalcolmS Plus
13 1.2k 13 England
9 Jan 2019 10:24AM
My PF is probably all cliches to the professionals, but hey, I don't care. If I took pictures to be popular or get loads of votes I wouldn't be on here, but I take the pictures I enjoy taking. If others enjoy them or not for their own reasons that's fine, there's lots I don't like/get but then that's fine too. Innovation for innovation sake is also a cliche, I may have a style, I don't know, I may have some soul, again I don't know.
I've seen this discussion so many times on here with the 'serious' togs decrying the cliched masses for a lack of originality, but this site has always been about learning so copying styles is part of that, as well as exhibiting, so people get what they want out of it or not as the case may be. Those that go, fair play to them, but personally the likes of Flickr and Instagram has never held any attraction and Facebook is the height of banality.
Yep, photography goes in phases. I've been thinking of stuff that I've done in the past; Buttermere Pines, Giants Causeway. Beautiful places, but all worth recording and done to death. Of course they are places that it's easy to get access to. See also planes, traction engines, steam trains and birds on twigs. Of course, if you enjoy these things, why not photograph them well. Of course, we all have a learning curve, and we will all do something that's not cutting edge as we learn.

I think some of the clichés might be because the subjects don't answer back.

Motivation, well I'm motivated by seeing my work in print or with a client as end result. Occasionally I will take a landscape for fun, but frequently it ends up published somewhere.

Access- now, a look at my portfolio will show some pictures where I had access to a subject as I was working for a newspaper. That of course means that in some cases I was on stage behind speaker stacks, alongside emergency services or with access to take photos simply because I was 'working'. You can't take your camera club along to photograph refugees en masses, but an article gets you in. However, in many occasions some of my best photos have just been obtained simply by asking- pub bands etc.

Sometimes getting a set of different pictures just requires thinking of a project, writing letters, finding somewhere to exhibit or publish it. In 1987 I shot a project of 24 hours in 24 locations in my town. Mosques, pubs, pizza parlour, factories etc. It toured as an exhibition for 2 years, and was my ARPS panel.

As to kit, I would stick my neck out, and say that we are blessed with amazing kit nowadays, especially 2nd hand. Lenses can be hired if you really want a fisheye etc.


GeorgeP Plus
11 34 17 United States
10 Jan 2019 1:26AM
I'm still waiting for the shot of undressed lady standing on the footplate of a 4-6-2 loco as a Tornado and Spitfire pass overhead - while crossing a steel girder bridge at dawn. That's sure to get my vote . . . .and yes, I confess to voting for all the above categories and trying to improve my photography by learning from folks who post here.

But I was struck by the comment from Mrswoolybill above that old photos that would be classed as "street photography" elicited most interest. I wonder if that is because they capture the passage of time - and because so few of us take those "documentary" shots. Time to step out of my comfort zone and change my photographic preferences perhaps? Does anyone need another shot of a Monarch butterfly - or oil rig in Galveston?
hobbo Plus
7 1.3k 2 England
10 Jan 2019 7:34AM

Quote:I'm still waiting for the shot of undressed lady standing on the footplate of a 4-6-2 loco as a Tornado and Spitfire pass overhead - while crossing a steel girder bridge at dawn. That's sure to get my vote . . . .and yes, I confess to voting for all the above categories and trying to improve my photography by learning from folks who post here.

But I was struck by the comment from Mrswoolybill above that old photos that would be classed as "street photography" elicited most interest. I wonder if that is because they capture the passage of time - and because so few of us take those "documentary" shots. Time to step out of my comfort zone and change my photographic preferences perhaps? Does anyone need another shot of a Monarch butterfly - or oil rig in Galveston?




Within this discussion we must also consider that to those new to photography, or to those about to retire, and returning to it, the success on acquiring a good shot of a Robin, their first Milky-`water or their ...Lonely Tree on ‘t Moors ....in their eyes are the tops ....whereas to we, old hands, the more experienced have seen it all before, over and over again...the very point of this debate.
We have ALL gone through that developmental stage of trying most techniques until we reach our comfort zone at whatever level....I recall that for three years I went nuts about macro photography, the dedicated lens and stacking kit cost a fortune....then severe loss of vision, and then retinal surgery, forced me to change tack, a smaller/lighter camera, one with a tiltable viewfinder...my Panasonic GX8 M4/3 ....A different view of the world.
The chance watching of a documentary on Vivienne Maier tipped me headlong into...Street Photography...and into the world on mono ....just like Vivienne, I hardly ever go out without a camera, so much so, that in my home town I am known as....the man with a camera...
I know now....that this is my photographic....Comfort-Zone... I think it shows in my work.
Other EPZ members have also reached their chosen place....Sawsengee...Littleflea...Dudlier....Lostrita....Karmen Fuchs....Rontear......all are willing to share their expertise if asked....just enjoy what all members produce....we are all on different rungs of the same photographic ladder.

My wished for pic.....A kingfisher, on a post at the end of a pier set in a milky sea...🤓

Above all.....Have Fun!

Hobbo

Well, there's one category that's gone missing in the UK at least.

Children are rarely shown in an exhibited photograph nowadays, and you certainly don't see them in 'street photography', probably due to a UK media obsession that all middle aged men with a camera should be treated with suspicion.

I think back to some of my work from the 1980s. One picture in particular, a group of Asian lads playing cricket against a stump painted on the wall of their terraced house that was awaiting demolition. I got them to pose for me, and I had the proud parents looking on in the background. The chances of being able to do that shot now?

Sadly there will be huge gaps in the visual history of the UK, where youth will be represented by the gurning, orange faced, duck pout selfie.
10 Jan 2019 8:39AM

Quote:Well, there's one category that's gone missing in the UK at least.

Children are rarely shown in an exhibited photograph nowadays, and you certainly don't see them in 'street photography', probably due to a UK media obsession that all middle aged men with a camera should be treated with suspicion.



So true, while waiting outside the school gates to collect my grandaughter from school I saw her in the playground lining up to go in, couldn't resist it, took a couple of pictures of her through the bars of the gate. Ten minutes later we are let in and I'm waiting for her to come out of the classroom when I'm approached by one of the teachers, thankfully she knew who I was, and asked if I would refrain from taking pictures of the children as they had been notified by other parents that a 'strange man' was taking photographs of the children! I showed her on the camera the pictures of my grandaughter, and yes, there were other children either side of her, but they were all wrapped up in hats,coats and scarves and hardly recognisble to anyone. She shook her head, said she was sorry, but that's the way it is these days. I said I wouldn't do it again, with a smile, and that was the end of it. These kids weren't in swimming togs or shorts but all wrapped up for winter!!!
altitude50 Plus
14 13.8k United Kingdom
10 Jan 2019 8:49AM
Just a comment about street photography.
This was taken certainly before 1914, it shows two men leaning on a post in a square in Nyons, France watching two young ladies passing by. (Detail from a larger photo.)
I think it is brilliant. And, no, I didn't take it.
21670_1547110130.jpg


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