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Time for a new PC, but which one


Dabber 17 235 England
19 Oct 2016 11:48PM
My current PC, which is pretty ancient is now painfully slow, therefore is due for repacement so I would welcome your advice and comments. Most of my PC work is photo/video orientated so that is what I need one to be good at.
Because of the need to save a bit of room, I'm tempted to go for an all in one(?) they don't appear to get a good press, anyone using one to good effect? Hopefully I can find something 500-600.
Thanks for looking

Dabber

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justin c 16 5.0k 36 England
20 Oct 2016 12:19AM
I think you'll struggle to find a 'good' video editing PC for that sort of money.
Carabosse 16 41.3k 270 England
20 Oct 2016 12:38AM
Look out for a PC with an Intel Core i7 or i5 (preferably quad-core) processor plus an NVIDIA GeForce graphics card. 8GB of RAM will be good too. Smile

But I agree with Justin - your budget is way below what would be needed for video-heavy work. Sad
justin c 16 5.0k 36 England
20 Oct 2016 12:56AM
Of course a lot also depends on how much video editing you're planning on doing, what software you're using and what video files you want to edit. HD video is very demanding on a system and 4K is even more so, should you be planning on that route.
500 - 600 will buy you a decent CPU such as THIS , which is an often recommended and popular choice for a video editing computer. You just need to add a few more quid for the motherboard, memory, GPU, CPU cooler, SSD drives (2 minimum), media storage drives, back-up drives, computer case (full tower, ideally), PSU, operating system, Sad
JackAllTog Plus
10 5.7k 58 United Kingdom
20 Oct 2016 1:15PM
I'd not get an all in one as i'd want to get the best colour monitor for editing.

I'd definitely try and get an SSD instead of a traditional spinning HD as the main drive in a PC as they are just so much faster when you run out of ram.

However its getting harder and harder to buy a traditional PC for the a lower end price.


For you budget i'd consider starting with something similar this
http://store.hp.com/UKStore/Merch/Product.aspx?id=T4R70ET&opt=ABU&sel=DTP
Its smaller than the old fashioned desktops, but not yet a micro PC.
I'd want to add an extra HDD drive of 1 or 2 TB ( and then backup USB drives).

Then I'd look to spend 300 on a good monitor if you can't reuse your old one.
JackAllTog Plus
10 5.7k 58 United Kingdom
20 Oct 2016 1:21PM
Nikonuser1 Plus
7 160 16 United Kingdom
20 Oct 2016 2:13PM
Hi
I am just building one now, mainly for photo editeing and would suggest that you look into building it yourself. There are loads of tutorials on U TUBE. Here is a link to one that would be a good start - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WQxr59KRto I based my build on this set up.

I have used the AMD FX6300 processor(this is a 6 core processor and can be overclocked),and the Gigabyte motherboard, the Seagate 1TB Hard drive as my base, but purchsed a second hand Corsair Carbide 300R case( from EBAY) I have gone for the Be Quiet Pure Power 9 500w power supply, a SSD drive to boot the computor. and a Gigabyte GTX 950 OC GPU and 8gb of Corsair Vengeance Ram. Cost approx approx 450.This is not includeing the cost of the OS if you need to buy it. If you are useing Wndows 10 make sure you have the 64bit version. If you allready have Windows 10 you can make a USB thumb drive and put that onto the new build here is a link on how to do it- https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/software-download/windows10

With this build you can upgrade as you want, IE add a bigger GPU, more Ram, add exfra cooling more Hard drives or ssd's. I use a seperate USB 1TB WD My Passport Ultra to store most of my images, so I do not need more the 1TB Seagate HD in the build. Do not forget that a good monitor is very impotant. If you have any queries please contact me.
I hope this helpsGrin

Regards

Cliff
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
20 Oct 2016 5:29PM

Quote:My current PC, which is pretty ancient is now painfully slow, therefore is due for repacement so I would welcome your advice and comments. Most of my PC work is photo/video orientated so that is what I need one to be good at.
Because of the need to save a bit of room, I'm tempted to go for an all in one(?) they don't appear to get a good press, anyone using one to good effect? Hopefully I can find something 500-600.
Thanks for looking

Dabber



You can put together a pretty good photo/video editing machine for that kind of money if you shop around and build your own, your cutting out the middle man and getting all the components at best possible prices.

Check out

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
20 Oct 2016 6:07PM

Quote:Because of the need to save a bit of room, I'm tempted to go for an all in one(?) they don't appear to get a good press, anyone using one to good effect?


Personally I would avoid all in one`s, ok for a bit of web browsing, writing the odd document but beyound that there a bit under powered and upgrading parts can be a pain.

To save space look at Micro ATX or Mini ITX cases and boards.

I built a Micro ATX system that is small and compact and sits on my desktop taking up very little space, its cool and quite as well.

Processors, Look at i5`s or the better AMD FX processors, 6 or 8 core, the kaveri`s are OK for photo editing but might be a little slow for video editing.
justin c 16 5.0k 36 England
20 Oct 2016 7:41PM
If you can 'find' the space, a full tower case is a much better option. It will allow far greater compatibility when choosing components, excellent upgrade potential for the future and most importantly, it will allow much better cooling options, which is very important when running a computer hard, i.e. video editing.
For 500 - 600 you may if you're prepared to build it yourself, to save cost, get something very mediocre that 'copes' with video editing if you're lucky, but you will not get a 'good' editing computer for that price. The speed difference between a budget computer and one that's designed for video editing will be huge.
You also need to budget for a balanced system for efficient editing. There's no point having a decent GPU, for instance, and an inadequate CPU, or slow hard drives or insufficient memory.
The CPU speed plays a big part, as does the number of cores, as does the GPU, as does the amount of memory, as does the hard drive speed. Unfortunately you get what you pay for and decent components for computer intensive operations aren't cheap.
Go to a couple of online decent computer retailers to get an idea of what sort of price and components they use for pre-built video editing computers. That will give you a starting point. You can then save a bit of money if you're prepared to build the system yourself.
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
20 Oct 2016 8:01PM

Quote:If you can 'find' the space, a full tower case is a much better option. It will allow far greater compatibility when choosing components, excellent upgrade potential for the future and most importantly, it will allow much better cooling options


A lot of old wives tales there.

Good cooling is about the build, design and layout, not the size of it, bigger cases often have greater cooling problems than smaller cases needing extra fans etc to funnel that warm air and maintain positive pressure.

As for component compatibly a lot has changed in the last 20 years, people once added extra usb cards and all sorts, a lot of the stuff people once added is not needed anymore.
justin c 16 5.0k 36 England
20 Oct 2016 8:42PM

Quote:A lot of old wives tales there.


No it's not. It's a fact. Explain how a smaller case would have greater compatibility and better upgrade potential than a full tower case?
Regarding the cooling. Decent video editing machines will normally go hand in hand with decent air coolers. Decent air coolers are large, often very large, and mostly wouldn't even fit in anything other than a full tower case. Having a couple of extra fans is neither here nor there. If someone is going to the trouble of buying/building a good system for video editing, having to buy an extra case fan or two isn't going to be a major concern in the grand scheme of things.
If the space can be found for a larger case, then the advantages hugely outweigh any disadvantages.


Quote:
As for component compatibly a lot has changed in the last 20 years, people once added extra usb cards and all sorts, a lot of the stuff people once added is not needed anymore.



You've missed the point completely. A larger (full tower) case will be compatible with all motherboards, all GPU's, any CPU cooler, any PSU, allow plenty of room for extra hard drives, etc. etc. The only slight disadvantages are a small financial penalty and a larger footprint.
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
20 Oct 2016 8:51PM

Quote:No it's not. It's a fact


Nope.
Dabber 17 235 England
20 Oct 2016 11:05PM
Well, lots to think about there! much as i'd like to build my own, the reallity is that I would probably spend more time faffing about with that than concentrating on the need to get a system in, up and running.

There are lots of good advice and recomendations regarding components, I will probably call into my local independant PC shop with the threads and see what we can up with. Maybe a few compromises in order to keep the overall cost sensible.

So thanks all for taking the time to share your ideas.

I'll let you know what I end up with!

Dabber
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
20 Oct 2016 11:27PM
To keep the cost down you could always check out Amazon, lots of good deals starting from around 400, you will be paying extra having something custom made.

This is probably the lowest spec I would consider and ok for your basic video editing and it includes an operating system (if your budget is tight)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/PC-Customiser-Ultra-Fast-Gaming/dp/B01DPP4YRG/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1477002014&sr=8-12&keywords=new%2Bpc&th=1


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