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Time for a new PC, but which one


Chris_L 6 5.4k United Kingdom
26 Oct 2016 3:00PM

Quote:The most important thing is the processor speed. The higher the better

That's very bad advice.

I'd rather have fast processor, fast memory and fast storage rather than an ultrafast processor that never runs at full speed because it's ran out of ram and is waiting for information from mechanical hard drives.

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Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
26 Oct 2016 8:41PM
Its all about balance, people here seem to be forgetting this.


Quote:fast memory and fast storage rather than an ultrafast processor that never runs at full speed because it's ran out of ram


Well if your out of ram your forcing the processor to do more work and there`s more to ram than just its speed, faster is not always better, you also need to take into account timings, CL ratings etc.
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
26 Oct 2016 8:45PM

Quote:
Quote:
Quote:Harddisk: https://www.overclockers.co.uk/samsung-sm951-512gb-m.2-pci-e-3.0-x-4-nvme-solid-state-drive-mzvpv512hdgl-00000-hd-214-sa.html


Lol, well that's a bit steep for someone on a budget.

You could pick up a 250GB SSD and a 2TB HDD for about £120.


Well, if you want the most bang for the buck why not do it? If you checked my total you would see I'm not far off budget. I'd rather build for the future, rather than regret what I got, and have to buy something new. Check the read/write speeds of that disk compared to a regular ssd and you might have a second opinion.
Personally I build my computers to last at least 5 years with very good performance, so I rather see the price per year rather than just the pricetag.



Well, if you want the most bang for the buck why not do it? If you checked my total you would see I'm not far off budget. I'd rather build for the future, rather than regret what I got, and have to buy something new.

Yet you recommended DDR3 ram and motherboard, as I just said, its all about balance.

Do any of you lot actually build systems ?
4k78l 3 278 1 New Caledonia
26 Oct 2016 9:36PM

Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:Harddisk: https://www.overclockers.co.uk/samsung-sm951-512gb-m.2-pci-e-3.0-x-4-nvme-solid-state-drive-mzvpv512hdgl-00000-hd-214-sa.html


Lol, well that's a bit steep for someone on a budget.

You could pick up a 250GB SSD and a 2TB HDD for about £120.


Well, if you want the most bang for the buck why not do it? If you checked my total you would see I'm not far off budget. I'd rather build for the future, rather than regret what I got, and have to buy something new. Check the read/write speeds of that disk compared to a regular ssd and you might have a second opinion.
Personally I build my computers to last at least 5 years with very good performance, so I rather see the price per year rather than just the pricetag.



Well, if you want the most bang for the buck why not do it? If you checked my total you would see I'm not far off budget. I'd rather build for the future, rather than regret what I got, and have to buy something new.

Yet you recommended DDR3 ram and motherboard, as I just said, its all about balance.

Do any of you lot actually build systems ?


He's on a 600£ budget for crying out loud, you get only 600£ worth of components. I could easily put together a proper work horse, but everything comes at a cost and I know you know that. Nothing wrong with DDR3 RAM at all, it's more about the amount of GB you got for the avid user, so I chose 16GB which do the trick for most people, but I guess you would rather choose more expensive DDR4 RAM and motherboard for wasting some money on a tight budget. If he had a bigger budget I'd choose an i7 cpu, but still, he's on a budget. For his budget and his use, 16GB of RAM and a fast 512GB OS harddrive will be bing bang for the buck. I skipped a graphics card to give more room to boost his needs, and room for a future upgrade if he feels like it later on. More storage is also something he can add at a later date, which is rather inexpensive as well. Just add a 3TB spin drive and you're set for a long time.
Yes, I actually build systems and have no problems what so ever doing so.
justin c 16 5.1k 36 England
26 Oct 2016 9:51PM

Quote:Well, if you want the most bang for the buck why not do it? If you checked my total you would see I'm not far off budget. I'd rather build for the future, rather than regret what I got, and have to buy something new.


Absolutely. £500-£600 on a PC that doesn't do the job or meet expectations is money wasted. Better to save a little longer if possible and get something that is up to the job and slightly future proof.
Paul Morgan 18 19.4k 6 England
26 Oct 2016 11:29PM

Quote:He's on a 600£ budget for crying out loud


Yep, as I keep telling you lot.
4k78l 3 278 1 New Caledonia
26 Oct 2016 11:50PM

Quote:
Quote:He's on a 600£ budget for crying out loud


Yep, as I keep telling you lot.


Ok then, show us a specific setup of your choice with all the parts - then we can have a talk. Smile
thewilliam 11 6.1k
27 Oct 2016 3:23PM
I was advised to put operating system/software on a separate spindle from the data and to use an additional drive for the PS scratch-disk. This is fully practical now that drives are so cheap, provided we have the space within the case.

These days, isn't the HDD generally the slowest part of the machine? Unless we use SSD!
Dabber 17 235 England
27 Oct 2016 4:42PM
All,
Thanks for taking the time to post your thoughts and advice regarding my need to upgrade the current PC.
After reading through them a few things became clear:-
* An 'all in one' solution didn't get much support, if anything it would have been a negative move. So even if it made my working space a bit tidier I would have sacrificed my main aim, which was to get a decent PC.

* I confess that when I set my budget figure I had no idea about the cost of things, I just hoped that I could fulfill my needs within that price range. However it has been pointed out many times that it is not possible to meet my aims without a bigger outlay.

*There were plenty of posts suggesting that the most cost effective approach would be to build my own after sourcing components on line. I'm sure that this would be the case, but I don't think that I could devote enough time and knowledge to complete a project like that. Basically I want to spend my time processing my photos and videos.
So armed with the advice, and possible options, I went to see my local, independant, PC repair man, who has always been really good when I've had various problems. So to cut a longish story short, this is what we agreed on:-
I will take in my current 'Tower' which is a really good one, and he will supply, fit and test and return to me the following in full running order.
1151 DDR4 Mother Board
Latest i7 CPU
480gig SSD for programs and processing ( my files will be on a 2tb External Drive)
16gig DDR4 Ram
600wat Be Quiet PSU
All for just over 900quid
It goes in Tomorrow

Hopefully I'll be happy for the next few years.
4k78l 3 278 1 New Caledonia
27 Oct 2016 5:15PM
Well that seems like a fair deal, and from what I see you'll have a nice solid machine for years to come Smile
justin c 16 5.1k 36 England
27 Oct 2016 5:42PM
Enjoy your new computer Grin and it's handy having someone you know and trust to build it for you.
I think you made the right choice by upping your budget and getting something that you'll be happy with.
A bargain basement PC World job would have only led to disappointment and defeated the purpose of why you wanted to upgrade in the first place. Most of us aren't fortunate enough to upgrade our machines every year or so, so it's good to have something that'll last several years and be upgrade-able further down the line, should you feel the need.
Just a further thought, when funds allow, at any stage in the future, it wouldn't be a bad idea to get yourself an internal mechanical hard drive for storing your photos and video files (a Western Digital Red or Caviar Black is a good choice), it will then free up your current external drive which will be ideal for backing everything up.
Dabber 17 235 England
4 Nov 2016 8:36PM
Well it's ready for collection tomorrow........can't wait.

Early Christmas present to self!

Dabber
Dabber 17 235 England
12 Nov 2016 4:37PM
OK, my ‘New’ system is awesome, everything now happens almost instantaneously at hit of the return key or mouse click.
However, my old ‘C’ on which my programs are is now D Drive and is still connected in my tower, but of course nothing runs from it. Basically it’s there in case of emergencies.
My new ‘C’ drive with the OS and programs installed is the new SSD. Up to now I have reloaded my Office suit and CS6.
Before I reload my next phase, Lightroom I need to get some understanding about what needs to be done to ensure that it works from the start. I have never really understood how Lightroom ‘manages’ the process.
My previous method of working is, all my photos are on a 2TB external drive (was ‘L’ Drive on the old set up, but shows up on this new set up as ‘H’ Drive. My guess is that it should be reconfigured to ‘L’ (?)
My Lightroom is Ver 4.4 on the CD but I upgraded it as a download from Adobe (maybe Ver 5)
When I down load it onto the SSD will I be able to upgrade from Adobe again?
Then when I run it how will I ensure that all of previous working catalogues match up to the original files!!!!! I always had trouble understanding what goes on there. I know that the original files are not altered in anyway, but the alteration ‘files’ are stored somewhere and matched up when the images are opened.
What is the procedure to ensure this will transfer over?
I’m nowhere near being a whizz on computers but the lad who did my upgrade is, but he’s not into the photographic side of things, but he will know how to ‘get all the ducks in a row’ if he gets the right instructions.
Can anyone help with either giving us precise details or lead us to where they might be on, say the Adobe Site.
Once again thanks all for comments, help and advice on my journey so far.
One last request (for now) now I have a superb video editing set up can anyone recommend a good program that will allow me to convert the many formats into the best for editing in Adobe Premiere Elements (mpeg2?) I have allsorts including MP4 and QuickTime amounts others.
I did a quick Google and there are loads, but I have no way of deciding which is the best. I’m sure that there are many of with good experiences and have settled on personal favourites. A free one would be good, but the overriding need is a good reliable solution.

Dabber
justin c 16 5.1k 36 England
13 Nov 2016 8:26AM
You can assign a different drive letter to your hard drive using Disk Management. If you change the drive letter to what it used to be then Lightroom should recognise it OK.
Dabber 17 235 England
13 Nov 2016 5:03PM
Sounds simple enough(??)
I'm going to get the latest Lightroom, is it Ver 6? and will the same rules apply?
i.e. Make sure my stored photos are in the same drive letter as original?

How can I verify where the Lightroom stores the changes for the hundreds already processed, just to make sure they match each other. Are they usually in the same drive/folder as the actual image file? What extension is used to enable me to search?

Once again thanks for your help and support.

Dabber

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