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UK Police Claim Filming Them Is an Offence


Krakman 10 3.6k Scotland
29 Sep 2007 12:25AM
Maybe, though more likely to be following police policy than insisting on the letter of the law. Just wondering if there was a source for it.

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veggiesosage 10 82 United Kingdom
29 Sep 2007 12:57AM
Oh dear. Just found that the Nottingham tog was found guilty of obstruction Sad

Article
doug_7 11 482 England
29 Sep 2007 6:43AM
Great video work. Remember the PC caught on camera beating up a youth for no reason. We have just had a sacking in the Wiltshire force for wrong doings by a so called police officer caught on camera. Perhaps they don`t like being in the spot light when they are doing wrong.
d.
lobsterboy Plus
13 14.8k 13 United Kingdom
29 Sep 2007 7:47AM

Quote:Got a source for that?


Don't need one. The way the law works is that you can do anything...unless its against the law. See if you can find a law that says you can't film them.
Coleslaw 11 13.4k 28 Wales
29 Sep 2007 8:13AM
well done to him!
I like midland accent...Smile
Krakman 10 3.6k Scotland
29 Sep 2007 9:20AM

Quote:Don't need one. The way the law works is that you can do anything...unless its against the law. See if you can find a law that says you can't film them.Quote this post

Sadly don't have a chance at the mo, just hopping on a train. But it's definitely illegal to photograph military installations and army personnel. Probably enough Googling would throw up the law and see if it's widely written enough to cover policemen too. I suspect it probably is, even if the police take a 'soft' attitude to enforcement of it. But could be wrong.
justin c 13 4.8k 36 England
29 Sep 2007 9:38AM
It looks like it was a case of taking offence at being filmed as well as perhaps being deliberately ackward and perhaps a little bullying to the member of the public involved.
In hindsight I'd say there were two obvious things missing that could have resulted in a much more professional approach as opposed to the obnoxious attitude displayed.
1) An apology at the end from both police officers wouldn't have gone amiss and would likely have done much to improve the police/public relationship at least with that individual. After all his filming and inquisitive nature may have helped in some way had the situation/outcome between police and 'suspect' been different.
2) Secondly a far more professional and considered approach would have been to check-up on how the law stands before rushing in like a bull in a china shop.
User_Removed 10 2.1k 7 England
29 Sep 2007 9:44AM
Surely if it was agaisnt the law they would have nicked him, never known them to miss the chance.
veggiesosage 10 82 United Kingdom
29 Sep 2007 10:32AM
There's an oft quoted pdf on UK photographers' rights and restrictions here .

Note however it is around 3 years old and was written before everyone got totally up their bottoms about the war on hand cream etc so not sure its still totally accurate.

Its worth pointing out that the police have no problems with systematically filming ordinary members of the public especially when they are on demos. The police also presumably get caught on the ever present cctv once in a while too...
lobsterboy Plus
13 14.8k 13 United Kingdom
29 Sep 2007 10:40AM

Quote:But it's definitely illegal to photograph military installations and army personnel.


It is illegal to take a photo of a "prohibited place" that might be useful to an enemy. I can find no restriction on photographing Army personnel.
keith selmes 13 7.2k 1 United Kingdom
29 Sep 2007 11:00AM
Photographers rights as referred to above.
Restrictions on a list of prohibited places, if the photos are useful to an enemy, and taken with that intent. Nothing more specific about personnel.
lobsterboy Plus
13 14.8k 13 United Kingdom
29 Sep 2007 11:09AM
Might make family snapshots for solders a bit difficult, what if the solder goes to his local bank & ends up on CCTV? If it is a law it's unenforceable AFAICS.
culturedcanvas 11 4.7k 59 United Kingdom
29 Sep 2007 11:45AM
I can think of no law which would apply to photographing or shotting video of the police in most normal day to day situations.

Dan
csurry 15 9.2k 92
29 Sep 2007 11:52AM
Did the bloke filming remind you of that old advert "I want to work in the gardiiin"
stevieb 13 3.0k 2 Panama
29 Sep 2007 1:31PM
This appears to turning into a blanket, lets have a go at the Police thread. So here is my balanced opinion Wink


Quote:T***s the lot of them.


What ALL of'em?

True: They should have got their facts right first. But, I was amused by the fact that having "won" his argument he then felt the need to goad and humiliate them. Ok, they did that to themselves by not checking, but he, in my opinion made a "t***" of himself afterward.

I haven't met them all, but I believe the vast majority of Police do a good job given the constraints they work under. And I bought one of their albums once Smile

Steve
*steps down from orange box*

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