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using dslr for video


keith selmes 17 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2012 9:05PM
From the little I've learned about video, I would have said

Put the camera on a tripod because its the stuff in front that moves not the camera

If the camera needs to move it goes on some kind of dolly or crane, or straps to a vehicle

If you need to work hand held, use a steadicam or shoulder mount.

If the LCD isn't good enough, plug in an external LCD mounted on whatever rig you have the camera on.

Audio is half of video, so don't use a built in mic, get something decent mounted, preferably with sound recording separate from the camera.

Quote:
This was shot hand held on a 7D with a Rode videomic for sound


Checking up that hand held 7D video, it really works for that subject matter.
But following up the blog and seeing what kit was actually used, the camera was on a Zacuto rig, sort of a small steadicam affair, with an extra viewfinder as well as the Rode mic. Sounds like there was a “saddle” shoulder mount in the kit as well.

I think in the context of this thread, we need to mention the extras required in addition to the camera. In fact the camera is really one component in the system, you don't just clip a mic on and go shoot hand held.

I would also strongly suggest you would need the same kind of rig for a micro 4/3 kit as well.

Ironically for this discussion, the most recent blog post at the Philip Bloom site is about a digital Bolex video camera in prototype, which he rather fancies instead of an Eos 5D-3 Grin

(On the whole it's a very informative blog with lots of interesting advice and ideas so thanks for the heads up)

The blog post showing the rig used
http://philipbloom.net/2009/11/05/new-short-venices-people-shot-on-the-canon-7d-in-24p/

Zacuto
http://www.zacuto.com/

Digital version of a Bolex 16mm movie camera.
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/joedp/the-digital-bolex-the-1st-affordable-digital-cinem?ref
User_Removed 17 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2012 9:26PM
I'm a fan of DSLR video and shoot with my 5DII but I do get where Steppenwolf is coming from. They are pretty useless at video for some users. I wouldn't recommend that friends buy them for shooting holiday videos, birthday parties etc

However used with a few accessories by people who know a bit about film-making, who can pre-plan a scene - often setting exposure, focus etc in advance - they can produce footage that looks like it's straight out of Hollywood at a price many enthusiasts find very attractive.

Quote:
the only advantage is the narrow DOF



and access to the EOS range of lenses - and anyway do not underestimate the usefulness of narrow DOF. It's used at some point in every major film to separate characters from the background to help with the telling of the story. Other video cameras that are capable of doing that properly are megabucks.
Steppenwolf 10 1.2k
16 Mar 2012 9:56PM

Quote:I guess the only advantage is the narrow DOF

What about the fact that you switch, in a split second, from taking stills to taking video. Certainly a godsend as far as I'm concerned.
Being able to use an absolutely huge range of lenses to cover all possible shooting scenario's.



The same can be said of the SLTs and M4/3 - although admittedly M4/3 doesn't have a huge range of lenses - and these cameras were designed with video in mind. Maybe you need to try making a video with an SLT and then try doing the same thing with a DSLR - they're worlds apart. In any case, in some situations, a good HD 3CMOS camcorder is better than either of them. Small sensors get a bum rap.
strawman 17 22.2k 16 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2012 10:35PM
I agree SLRs are not optimal for video. Why would an SLT camera be better for video? I think the eVF is a bonus for video but as I understand it the moment you walk away from the program setting and go for the sort of controls film makers would want like manual exposure or aperture priority etc it drops out of autofocus, and the lenses are not the best for Video as they lack in-lens IS. You can see why Sony designed the better for video NEX-FS100UK using the NEX mount as the lenses have IS. And the audio is an auto levels only system, so if serious video is your thing its not a great choice, and if its family video's etc then compacts already do excellent video.

If you want video and autofocus would contrast AF not be better as you can do clever things like focus following, so set your object and choose to have clever tracking if you want or keep it manual and play with your choice of what is in focus. This is where those focus stacked sensors in the future could be great, because if you used them you could record the scene and move your shallow depth of field focus point in post production. That could be very good.

For those on a budget do the Panasonic G series not make excellent video cameras?

For those on a budge these DIY extras may help
Carabosse 18 41.6k 270 England
16 Mar 2012 10:41PM
The guys on here seem to manage pretty well with their video-DSLRs. Wink
keith selmes 17 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2012 11:26PM

Quote:For those on a budget do the Panasonic G series not make excellent video cameras?
They do and you can use all manner of lenses on them
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
16 Mar 2012 11:50PM

Quote:For those on a budget do the Panasonic G series not make excellent video cameras?


I`ve been using lensbaby`s for video, for me there`s nothing better than a G series Smile
rogerfry 16 543 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2012 11:52PM

Quote:For those on a budget do the Panasonic G series not make excellent video cameras?They do and you can use all manner of lenses on them


It's worth spending a bit extra to get theGH2 which is great quality for video, and offers more control on settings.
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
16 Mar 2012 11:58PM
User_Removed 12 1.4k England
17 Mar 2012 3:04AM
You can film high quality video on a stock DLSR quite easily; you just need to know how to use real videography equipment. They are not popular because of the DOF they can achieve but the large dynamic range. - It makes up for the shitty sampling a DSLR sensor will do to create a 1080 frame.

Phase AF ism't really used outside of consumer circles; most people just buy a rack/follow wheel focus for the DSLR rig.
LenShepherd 13 4.4k United Kingdom
17 Mar 2012 7:41AM

Quote:Yet I read that the BBC often use Canon DSLR's to make programmes? What am I missing?

Video skill and understanding Wink
The BBC are used to working from a very heavy tripod with video head, use lens attachments for manual focus most of the time, are likely to plug in a small monitor with 7 inch screen for a bigger viewfinder image, and are likely to record sound separately.
Switching to the latest Nikon there is an earphone socket to help monitor sound quality, and provision for outputting uncompressed video to external devices for higher level video quality.
Top BBC quality video is rarely just point and shoot, or a DSLR and lens without any video accessories.
Usually there is a team of at least 3. One is the director who decides what to shoot. One is the focus puller adjusting focus manually. One is the sound recorder.
The BBC has the budget to use whatever recording device best suites the sequence. DSLR's tend to be used for shallow depth of field effects despite some other video recording limitations.
thatmanbrian 10 342 3 Spain
17 Mar 2012 10:24AM
I agree, and the unions probably still insist on minimum manning anyway, hence my comment when I used a 16mm camera and sound recorder on my own, against the rules. Alan Sapper would have had a fit!! The BBC have made complete programmes using Canon DSLRs but as you say, not like we might do, hand-holding and using the camera mike.

My 7D has numerous options for video so presumably from what has been said, the obvious, highest spec may not really be the best choice?
Steppenwolf 10 1.2k
17 Mar 2012 10:30AM

Quote:Why would an SLT camera be better for video? I think the eVF is a bonus for video but as I understand it the moment you walk away from the program setting and go for the sort of controls film makers would want like manual exposure or aperture priority etc it drops out of autofocus, and the lenses are not the best for Video as they lack in-lens IS.


The fact is that you can use an SLT for video straight out of the box - without buying any expensive and bulky attachments. The state of the art EVF is slightly more than a "bonus", I'd say, and the fact that the AF requires the camera to be in program mode is a limitation you have to accept - these SLTs are not expensive cameras by any means. At least you have the option of AF. I know that the perceived inadequacies of in-camera IS are a bit of a hobbyhorse with you STrawman, but it seems to me to work very well - the IS on the A77 is certainly very much better than that on the A700. It means that I can stick any of my "antiquated" (in your words) Minolta lenses on the A77 and shoot AF fully stabilised videos while looking through a great view finder. There is something slightly magical in this to simple people like me. I guess I'm not clever enough to see all the problems.
thatmanbrian 10 342 3 Spain
17 Mar 2012 10:47AM
When a SLT is in movie mode, it autofocuses yes? So does it do this invisibly, because otherwise it will be distracting unless it is perfect and fast.
User_Removed 17 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
17 Mar 2012 12:56PM

Quote:The BBC are used to working from a very heavy tripod with video head, use lens attachments for manual focus most of the time, are likely to plug in a small monitor with 7 inch screen for a bigger viewfinder image, and are likely to record sound separately.


Quote:
I agree, and the unions probably still insist on minimum manning anyway



For at least a decade 25% of BBC programmes are produced by independent producers using all manner of equipment.

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