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Wedding Photography Focal Lengths and lens choices


ade_mcfade 15 15.2k 216 England
18 Aug 2014 10:34AM
What you say will have more impact on the photos than the focal length... ?

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keithh 15 25.5k 33 Wallis And Futuna
18 Aug 2014 12:41PM
How about a graph to show how many photos have how many people in them compared to how many sold?

Or a pie chart illustrating sales against weather conditions on the day of the wedding.
ade_mcfade 15 15.2k 216 England
18 Aug 2014 12:48PM
graph of "ratio of people smiling" in a shot versus sales of the photo (maybe just 10 bars - 0-0.1 then .0.1 to 0.2 ... etc.)


no.people smiling
_____________ v sum of number of sales for each "bar"

No. people in the shot
2 Dec 2014 1:29AM
Thats interesting data on that graph pulsar69, thanks for sharing it.

I've been shooting the 50mm, 85mm and recently with the 16-35mm on my Canon. The majority of the images after selections and final edits tend to be 50mm (80%), 85mm (15%) and 16-35mm (5%).

I guess it depends on shooting style but I like getting in close, I get much more interaction this way. But again its all about styles and everyone has their own unique take on things.
thewilliam 10 6.1k
2 Dec 2014 11:17AM
The metadata for the album shots can also be interesting.

Look at the aperture: how often was a lens used wide open? How often did you use the aperture that cost you so much more than the basic model? The f1.4 or even f1.2 version of a lens will cost between 2 and 10 times more than the f1.8 entry-model but, for Nikon, the expensive versions are rarely any sharper.
SteveCharles 16 2.3k 18 England
2 Dec 2014 3:32PM
35 & 85
Chris_L 5 5.0k United Kingdom
2 Dec 2014 4:01PM

Quote:How often did you use the aperture that cost you so much more than the basic model

In a way all the time because that extra light into the viewfinder not only helps you compose but it helps you achieve faster focus and more accurate focus.

Metadata from zoom lenses is pretty interesting. I think the majority of the time I used my zooms at one of the extremes.
ade_mcfade 15 15.2k 216 England
2 Dec 2014 8:36PM
weddings are often in dark, dingey places so your lens is often fully open... viva F1.4!
adrian_w Plus
11 3.8k 4 England
2 Dec 2014 10:58PM

Quote:weddings are often in dark, dingy places.....


Yes but they do have weddings in places other than Leeds! Wink
thewilliam 10 6.1k
18 Apr 2016 3:28PM
There are three questions in my mind. Firstly, would you take any more pix at that focal-length if you used an 85mm prime rather than the zoom. Secondly, how often would the f1.2 lens be opened up beyond f2 or whatever the modestly priced 85mm would give. Thirdly, are you happy to carry the increased weight? At what stage does the camel's back break?
thewilliam 10 6.1k
18 Apr 2016 3:32PM

Quote:
Quote:How often did you use the aperture that cost you so much more than the basic model

In a way all the time because that extra light into the viewfinder not only helps you compose but it helps you achieve faster focus and more accurate focus.



Does the very small DoF of the f1.2 ever mislead the user? The focusing image would show distracting background elements blurred into a soft bokeh but, in the taken image, these elements are a lot sharper and therefore might be a problem.

Also some lenses give focus shift, so would an object which is sharp at f1.2 still be the sharpest at f11. Some of the most famous lenses give focus shift!
LenShepherd 11 3.9k United Kingdom
18 Apr 2016 6:46PM

Quote:
Quote:
Quote:How often did you use the aperture that cost you so much more than the basic model

In a way all the time because that extra light into the viewfinder not only helps you compose but it helps you achieve faster focus and more accurate focus.



Does the very small DoF of the f1.2 ever mislead the user? The focusing image would show distracting background elements blurred into a soft bokeh but, in the taken image, these elements are a lot sharper and therefore might be a problem.


Unless you only shoot liveview with a camera that displays depth of field at the selected aperture, there is perhaps some misunderstanding and confusion as to what it is possible to see through a conventional viewfinder.
Viewfinders act as a second aperture and restrict transmitted light and the depth of field effect, usually to no wider than about f2.5 to 2.8. While f1.2 and f1.4 lenses have special uses; you cannot see anything wider than about f2.5 dof (it depends on the camera model) or any brighter than about f2.5 viewfinder brightness through a conventional viewfinder on a modern DSLR.
Working with Liveview displaying the actual f1.2 of f1.4 depth of field effect is another matter.
Evertonian 6 729 England
22 Apr 2016 9:02AM

Quote:Yes i noticed the heavy leaning towards the 40-70 range too ! However it could be argued that's possibly due to sometimes being racked out at 70 on the 24-70 and sometimes wide at 70 on the 70-200 so the 70mm length gets a lot of use. There is no such animal as a 70mm lens is there ?


THERE IS ALWAYS THIS NICE LENS.

229132_1461312133.jpg

Railcam 12 744 2 Scotland
22 Apr 2016 11:15AM

Quote:ah ok - manual data gather then.

there's probably a little program to be written there for some geek Wink



Lightroom> Library Module> Library Filter> Metadata does something similar for selected folders.


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