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Which would be the best lens protector?


cheddar-caveman 16 1.2k England
8 Dec 2019 11:44AM
Absolutely, I would rather buy a filter than a lens! (even if it is insured).

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Dave_Canon Plus
13 1.7k United Kingdom
8 Dec 2019 12:37PM
Of course it entirely up to you but I have proved to myself that the use of filters can seriously deteriorate the IQ in many circumstances. I do not want to suffer that reduction in quality and for no gain. I find it hard to believe that so many photographers do damage the front element (or filter if fitted). In over 40 years I have never damaged a front element (or filter when I did use them for film) and not likely that I would. If you dropped the lens onto concrete the filter will offer no protection and is more likely to cause more damage. If you use a lens hood and replace the lens cap when not shooting you will have all the protection you need. The only exception to this is if photographing in a severe environment which I have rarely done so and not for several years. Perhaps, by using a filter some convince themselves that they no longer need to be careful; a dirty scratched filter would make the IQ reduction even worse. Also stacking filters produces even more problems with flare and contrast reduction. Does everyone remove their protection filter when using a PF or Stopper? I am told that changing a filter is the most likely circumstances for touching the front element or dropping the whole thing.

Dave
LenShepherd 12 4.1k United Kingdom
8 Dec 2019 1:09PM

Quote:During WW1, they reported an increase, rather than a decrease, in head injuries after the introduction of steel helmets.I suspect that the reason was that, without a helmet, the soldier would be killed rather than wounded.


One reason for the increase is a metal helmet absorbs no impact force - and some (like filters for protection) came to a wrong conclusion.
LenShepherd 12 4.1k United Kingdom
8 Dec 2019 1:14PM

Quote: I find it hard to believe that so many photographers do damage the front element (or filter if fitted). In over 40 years I have never damaged a front element (or filter when I did use them for film) and not likely that I would.


My experience is similar - except I once had a front element damaged by an arrow from a bow and arrow - not an everyday occurrence.
A new front element cost 12 - and there is a simple tool for unlocking and relocking the securing ring.
bainsybike 10 336 United Kingdom
8 Dec 2019 1:15PM
I find with certain lenses that it can be tricky to put the lens cap on with the lens hood in place, so that it's easy to touch the front element accidentally when doing so. Perhaps that would be a reason for using a filter, as would letting somebody else use your camera?
cheddar-caveman 16 1.2k England
8 Dec 2019 2:57PM
I'm not so concerned about actual damage as just general dust and the like. Repeatedly cleaning the front element can't be good for it no matter how careful one is.
Dave_Canon Plus
13 1.7k United Kingdom
8 Dec 2019 5:15PM

Quote:I'm not so concerned about actual damage as just general dust and the like. Repeatedly cleaning the front element can't be good for it no matter how careful one is.

Why do you need to clean the front element if you never touch it. My most recent lens is just over 2 years old and I have never cleaned it; it still looks the same as when I took it out the box (taken around 4000 shots with it). Other lenses I have rarely cleaned or needed to. Incidentally, the Canon caps are easy to put on even with the lens hood in place and it would not be possible to touch the front element when doing so. However, if shooting Studio shots, I assume that you would remove all filters anyway as the effects of the lights in front of the camera seriously reduces the contrast and sharpness by light scatter caused by the filter surfaces.

Dave
cheddar-caveman 16 1.2k England
8 Dec 2019 6:08PM
I shoot almost exclusively wildlife and no matter how careful one is, the lens will pick up dust etc If you've never had to clean your lens in two years then you must keep it in an air tight box all the time and certainly don't go tracking through the countryside with it. Just hanging around ones neck it can pick up dust from you, the wind etc.
JJGEE 15 7.7k 18 England
8 Dec 2019 8:29PM

Quote:Why do you need to clean the front element if you never touch it. My most recent lens is just over 2 years old and I have never cleaned it; it still looks the same as when I took it out the box (taken around 4000 shots with it)

I wish the lenses in my spectacles were as good as your camera lens Wink

LenShepherd 12 4.1k United Kingdom
8 Dec 2019 9:17PM

Quote:I find with certain lenses that it can be tricky to put the lens cap on with the lens hood in place,

The alternative with most lenses is to reverse the lens hood - it usually takes less than 3 seconds.
cheddar-caveman 16 1.2k England
9 Dec 2019 9:44PM
With wildlife photography three seconds can be the difference between a picture or not a picture 😳

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