GB Sports Photographer & The Panasonic LUMIX S1

Words Fail Me...


jondf 13 2.8k
16 Sep 2019 2:05PM
Well, they don't but I wouldn't want the Ephotozine censors coming after me -

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-49714597

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

bluesandtwos 9 405 1 England
16 Sep 2019 5:20PM
17 convictions, 31 offences and still free to walk about killing the innocent. Why??? Sad
GeorgeP Plus
12 53 23 United States
16 Sep 2019 7:18PM
Tragic. I suppose the only positive thing is that he was not in the US where the weapon might have been an AR-15 (or equivalent) with a 100-round magazine. But then, during one of the previous encounters, an armed police office might have "feared for their life" and shot him, thus avoiding the subsequent trauma.

The article doesn't say what penalty the court imposed. As he is a "youth", can he be sentenced appropriately? [whatever passes for appropriate these days.]
banehawi Plus
15 2.1k 4036 Canada
16 Sep 2019 8:59PM
Thats so tragic.
cuffit Plus
12 342 5 England
16 Sep 2019 11:59PM
Northumberland Police remark "Mr Duncan was in the wrong place at the wrong time" when he was attacked. I think they have it the wrong way round. Had Mr Duncan's assailant been in the 'right place at the right time' given his track record over two years, Mr Duncan would still be alive.
Big Bri 18 16.5k United Kingdom
17 Sep 2019 8:51AM
Needs to be zero tolerance for carrying a weapon, regardless of age. Ten years, no parole.

The easiest way to solve this country's problems is to build more prisons and get the scum off the streets instead of being so damn soft.
AlexE 2 158 United Kingdom
17 Sep 2019 10:24AM

Quote:Needs to be zero tolerance for carrying a weapon


I agree, but in this case that ban would not have changed the outcome of this event.
Big Bri 18 16.5k United Kingdom
17 Sep 2019 1:32PM

Quote:
Quote:Needs to be zero tolerance for carrying a weapon


I agree, but in this case that ban would not have changed the outcome of this event.



He'd have been in prison from the first time he threatened someone with a blade.
thewilliam2 2 1.3k
17 Sep 2019 2:37PM
The problem is that pretty well anything can be used as a weapon and many "weapons" would be tools in another context.

Screwdrivers like that used for the murder could be found in the majority of homes. A chef on his/her way to/from work might carry a case full of very lethal knives. Many tools in a builder's van would make good weapons!

Ultimately aren't the best deterrents the certainty of being caught and the fear of a horrible punishment? One advantage of the death penalty is that it reduced the recidivism rate to zero!
17 Sep 2019 6:45PM

Quote:The problem is that pretty well anything can be used as a weapon and many "weapons" would be tools in another context.

Screwdrivers like that used for the murder could be found in the majority of homes. A chef on his/her way to/from work might carry a case full of very lethal knives. Many tools in a builder's van would make good weapons!

Ultimately aren't the best deterrents the certainty of being caught and the fear of a horrible punishment? One advantage of the death penalty is that it reduced the recidivism rate to zero!



Prove it. Many studies have shown that punishment never reduced crime. In many countries murder is punishable by death. But, murderous crimes still persist.

Sadly I see no solution to this incident and what it represents. Maybe go back into the lad's life and asked what caused him to behave as he did. Was he abused as a child? Then better child care laws may be in order. It is better to look for the cause and address that rather than address the consequence, IMO.

And, as for building more prisons - who is going to pay for that and support of the prisoners and guards? That would be a hefty price tag. Any price would do, you say? Then to pay for it how about reducing old age pensions and stopping free universal healthcare. To high a price to pay? Think about it.
Big Bri 18 16.5k United Kingdom
17 Sep 2019 7:33PM

Quote:And, as for building more prisons - who is going to pay for that and support of the prisoners and guards? That would be a hefty price tag. Any price would do, you say? Then to pay for it how about reducing old age pensions and stopping free universal healthcare. To high a price to pay? Think about it.


I've obviously already thought about it more than you.

Currently our largest costs are welfare, health and pensions. In total, they take around 57% of our public expenditure. Welfare being the highest - around 24.3% (172 billion).

Public order and safety is only 4.2% (around 30 billion).

I reckon you could easily double the public order budget and the resulting increase in incarcerated scumbags could probably cut the welfare budget by at least the same. That's my own opinion of course.
I can't "prove it".

But it would do more to improve the daily lives of 95% of the population than leaving the EU and adding a paltry 4.7 billion (0.7%) to the NHS.
Fma7 4 985 United Kingdom
17 Sep 2019 7:51PM

Quote:
Prove it. Many studies have shown that punishment never reduced crime. In many countries murder is punishable by death. But, murderous crimes still persist.



Not if you don't know what recidivism is Tongue
JackAllTog Plus
10 5.6k 58 United Kingdom
17 Sep 2019 11:12PM
Lets go all the way - Body scanners, Knife arches, Face detection, ID cards - with Significant non soft incarceration for first time offenses and early release only possible when the defendant has proved he can be a contributor to society by learning an employable skill etc.
Coupled with early childhood intervention and improved education, more teachers, smaller classes and social fulfilment for 12+ year olds with multiple smaller free sports centres, libraries and anger management classes for children to stop wasting life and instead develop a sense of positive purpose.
Coupled with immigration training & language probation periods to ensure successful integration to avoid pockets of deprivation and limited social mobility.
Coupled with much improved mental health care, not left to failing care in the community initiatives.
Coupled with strong community initiatives to behave with consideration to others in the first place.

I wish humans were not so difficult.

Seriously something needs to stop the scenario of "17 convictions, 31 offences and still free to walk about killing the innocent"

hobbo Plus
8 1.3k 2 England
18 Sep 2019 4:44AM
I know that it is good Psychology that, the sooner a positive reward or, alternatively a negative punishment is given, the better the outcome.

It follows then, that, at the earliest signs of delinquency, the sooner rewards are given for improving outlook, behaviors and progress, the better.

Likewise, the sooner and more striking the punishment for a deadly misdemeanor is given, the more effective it will be.
Punishment....after say, three chances to improve are ignored should be swift and extremely unpleasant, sometimes it is good to be cruel-to be kind..( as my strict old mam would tell us)
Serious criminals should pay in all ways for any losses or physical or mental hurt they are proven to have caused.

I will return....as an old fogey can.....to our National Service for all males at age 18.....we were ALL taught to kill, but knife and other crime rates were lower than they are now...and punishments were much stricter....but not always well thought out....

Society is supposed to improve as it progresses, but ours is currently in reverse gear....something needs to be done urgently....

I rest my case.

Hobbo
GeorgeP Plus
12 53 23 United States
18 Sep 2019 2:49PM
Crime, punishment, restitution for the victim and rehabilitation for the criminal are all great concepts. I don't know the correct balance. I do know that years ago a pupil from the American School in Singapore was canned for vandalism. I have not heard of any other pupils repeating his crime. Nor is vandalism generally prevalent in Singapore. Similarly, I have seen merchants in Saudi simply cover their goods with a net and leave them exposed when they head off for prayer. Everyone around knows the punishment for petty theft. Those goods are safe. Sometimes it seems that punishment can be a deterrent. I am not suggesting we bring back the birch, capital punishment or interminable prison sentences. I also admit that nothing will stop "crimes of passion" or stupid acts by immature people. But, our current focus seems to have the balance askew.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.