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Working at Home - Groundhog day


JackAllTog Plus
11 5.9k 58 United Kingdom
26 Mar 2020 5:07PM
Pro's
- Obviously, Not getting/passing on C19
- No travel to Work
- time to garden before/after work ( or do another still life or flower)
- getting lots of those little jobs done

Cons
- no change of scene
- looking out the window but can't dig that veg patch as 'at work'
- homeschooling a 9 year old
- eating too much
- a 7 day identical week

Is retirement like this, but without the wage slave 8 hour enforcement of the PC taskmaster.

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saltireblue Plus
9 10.4k 59 Norway
26 Mar 2020 6:41PM

Quote:Is retirement like this, but without the wage slave 8 hour enforcement of the PC taskmaster.

Definitely not.
Retirement gives you freedom, without daily ties and responsibilities, and you can change your plans when you wake up if you aren't in the mood to do what you decided yesterday evening.
Time of day means less, you don't have to do things within certain time constrictions, and as with many other aspects of life;
You get as little or as much out of every day as you decide.
petebfrance 8 2.9k France
26 Mar 2020 8:10PM
Nah, it's a bit different:
Cons
- no change of scene - not the same, fortunately.
- looking out the window but can't dig that veg patch as 'at work' - curses - I wish I had that excuseSad
- homeschooling a 9 year old - unlikely, I think, although there is pressure from certain members of the family. Actually, here lots of grandparents end up looking after the kids all through the holidays.
- eating too much - hmm. After a while the appetite reduces a little. Perhaps drinking too much could become an issueWink
- a 7 day identical week - No, not at all. Shopping Tuesdays and Fridays! What a mad, hectic life I lead!
Jestertheclown 11 8.1k 252 England
26 Mar 2020 8:56PM

Quote:Is retirement like this, but without the wage slave 8 hour enforcement of the PC taskmaster.

I don't think so.

I'm just learning how to do it; I work in a school but I shall retire in July at the end of the current academic year.

However this virus thingy and being in the "at risk" bunch has meant that I'm now being paid to stay at home for at least the next twelve weeks.

That layoff and a couple of weeks owed holiday means that, even if the school does reopen at some point next term, I probably shan't go back.

Happy days?

Yes, so far.
Tianshi_angie 5 2.9k England
26 Mar 2020 9:26PM
Retirement - like being in isolation - depends to some extent on the state of your health. If you are well and have hobbies then the day is not long enough - too many things that you want to do as opposed to 'have' to do. The clock is, largely, irrelevant and once into that mind set you don't tend to eat too much as you're often too busy doing stuff that the clock which said 'It's elevenses/lunch/tea/dinner time' disappears. And on a whim you can do anything or go anywhere you suddenly have the desire for. Isolation limits the trips outside the home - and there is a 'haunting feeling' that 'you can't'. And if your health is not good in retirement or isolation then everything to some extent depends on how you are - that in itself can be depressing or debilitating. And like everything in life (as I have found it) it depends on how you approach it. It can be an adventure or a terrible bore - up to you.
JackAllTog Plus
11 5.9k 58 United Kingdom
26 Mar 2020 10:29PM
LOL - thanks Smile OK bring on retirement Smile Though i'd still want to garden more than i could.
PRC 5 236 United Kingdom
26 Mar 2020 10:36PM
I remember retired people telling me that they didn't know how they time to go to work and I couldn't believe them. Now that I'm retired I say the same thing! Time is flying; there are so many opportunities to keep yourself occupied if you choose to keep busy.
sherlob Plus
14 3.1k 129 United Kingdom
26 Mar 2020 10:53PM
I miss going to the office - I never thought Iíd say that!

Iím finding Iím working harder - the number of daily emails has doubled (if not trebled). Itís so easy to put way too many hours in and not take the required breaks. However, the loss of psychological separation that place equals work and this place equals home is hard.

Iím also feeling guilty. Iím a nurse in an educational role. My specialty was ICU with a particular interest in ventilation, but I now fall into a high risk group and am not allowed to work on the front line. Iím doing what I can on the sidelines (eg helping students and retirees prepare), but Iím not even allowed to do this face to face, and really itís not where I want to be. I know the risk of my becoming ill and adding to the burden is why Iím not allowed to help, but tbh itís f@@king frustrating.

Sorry, that turned into a rant. I suspect I needed to get it off my chest.
capto Plus
7 6.1k 15 United Kingdom
26 Mar 2020 10:54PM
Time accelerates with each passing year, don't let it go to waste.
hobbo Plus
9 1.4k 3 England
27 Mar 2020 7:34AM
Retirement....a long one....Iím 82 now, has messed up my body-clock completely...

I retire at around 8:30 pm, read for half an hour then sleep solidly until between 03:00 and 04:00 am when I get up as fresh as a daisy....( not forgetting a natural break partway through the night )

Now that Iím a shut-in vulnerable old fogey.... I write/process pics/create a photo book/ or browse on my iPad, until the bread maker dings to tell me a freshly baked loaf is done.
Then, itís into the workshop, old office, or attic to do lots of long promised sorting and tidying ...that takes me to lunchtime...
At the first jingles of BBC Bargain hunt I fall into a deep armchair sleep, for at least an hour, sometimes with music playing instead of tv.
Batteries re-charged....Iím all ready to.....Paint in my makeshift conservatory studio...to process photoís or to get down and dirty on the wood lathe to turn another lidded box...

After dinner, watching the news, then perhaps a film... I make my weary but happy way back upstairs ...

It is right....a Time....does accelerate the older you get... I try to persuade those much younger to target retirement at age 55 ....if they can.... life is very short.

Stay safe and Happy....

Exits stage left ....whistling ....."The Bright Side of Life"
mrswoolybill Plus
13 1.9k 2169 United Kingdom
27 Mar 2020 8:22AM
There are a lot of retired people on the site for whom ePHOTOzine has long been an important part of their lives - I suspect that the same will become true for members working from home now. The site can give a direct link to others on the same wavelength, that is going to become increasingly valuable.

Retirement - well it's what you make of it. Among people we know the constant refrain is 'How did we ever find the time to work?' For anyone struggling to adapt to retirement, once all this is over and just a nasty memory, check out local volunteering opportunities, check out your nearest U3A.
27 Mar 2020 10:02AM

Quote:
Retirement - well it's what you make of it. Among people we know the constant refrain is 'How did we ever find the time to work?' For anyone struggling to adapt to retirement, once all this is over and just a nasty memory, check out local volunteering opportunities, check out your nearest U3A.



I very much agree with Moira! I laughed at my parents when, after just a few weeks of retirement, they said they had no idea how they ever found time to go to work. They were far from wealthy but enjoyed simple things, the company of family and friends, gardening, my dad took up watercolour painting ( he got quite good at it! His local working mans club asked him to do a series of local village scenes for their quiet room, I believe that many years later they are still there.Smile)

Now retired I know exactly what they mean! Provided you have reasonable health, and a little imagination, retirement is great.Grin

Dave
brian1208 16 11.6k 12 United Kingdom
27 Mar 2020 10:27AM
Retirement is like any other career move, you need to plan before you make the move, work out what you want to do after the move and be prepared for a period of discomfort when you first start in your new role.

I've been retired 23 years now and its the best career I ever had Grin

As for self-isolation, I never liked most people anyway but I love and enjoy the company of my wife, so no worries there (mind you, it helps that she has her own china painting studio where she always spends a lot of time and I have my macro and wild-life photography in the garden, gives us something to talk about each time we meet Wink )
SlowSong Plus
11 8.7k 30 England
27 Mar 2020 10:35AM
I retired early, not through choice - no jobs for "oldies" around my way. But I volunteered at places of my chosing, at neither of which I would ever have been offered a paid post. It's great, as I can chose when I work and do jobs I love doing without having to go through the usual corporate rubbish that employees are obliged to. On my days off I wander around town taking photographs, visiting galleries and museums, potter around at home and generally please myself. I do miss the structure of a "proper" job and I did find the adjustment quite tricky at first, but you soon get used to a new way of life. The only problem is that Hubs is still working full time and will probably do so until he drops, but his work is his life so I can't begrudge him that.
mrswoolybill Plus
13 1.9k 2169 United Kingdom
27 Mar 2020 11:26AM

Quote:Retirement is like any other career move, you need to plan before you make the move, work out what you want to do after the move and be prepared for a period of discomfort when you first start in your new role.

I totally agree, I have seen people who have not allowed themselves a period to adjust before diving into too many new activities and that can be counter-productive.

The problem at the moment is that a lot of people are thrown into staying indoors with no advance preparation (apart from stocking up on loo rolls...)

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