Amazon Kindle Unlimited Offer: 1-Month For FREE!

www.buypixel.com


PatrickSmith 16 1.2k 2 United States
6 Sep 2005 7:50AM
I don't think that professional photography can be undermined any more than professional programming can be undermined.

Have you noticed how photographers are going about putting up websites now? They don't hire professional programmers to do a custom job, they take the less expensive route of signing up with a web firm to knock out a quick and functional website with a very few 'custom' features in a very short period of time. There is little 'real' programming involved. Is this undermining professional programming? No. It is just a more efficient way of doing a common programming task.

For example, I have written a custom photography website program. (No, I am not selling it!) It has an unlimited number of galleries, and custom word search galleries also. It is dynamic and database driven, like EPZ. But I would not try to compete with the canned versions available because I know that I would be competing in a market that has evolved into a common commodity.

Stock photography, regardless of quality, is now a common commodity, like canned programming.

Patrick
keithh 17 25.8k 33 Wallis And Futuna
6 Sep 2005 8:00AM
It's like any other part of life.

First you had garages...now you have Kwik Fit

First you had the local market...now you have Asda.

First you had the local library...now you have the internet.

Once upon a time you had high brow image libraries....now you have Microstock.
Actually when you go through their site forums, it's like counting clicks with money.
Wink
covey 16 1.7k Ireland
6 Sep 2005 8:02AM
Best suggestion in ages Keith. Cut out the hearts and replace them with money Smile t.
Bernie 17 2.2k
6 Sep 2005 8:03AM
It's the digital age we live in.
Everybody who now owns a digi, believes they are good photographers because they can delete what they consider rubbish.
You only have to gleam from this site the vast amount of people setting up sites to sell images because they have(overnight) become great photographers...lol

I find it all quite amusing.
My digi must be broken because I'm still useless..lol
keithh 17 25.8k 33 Wallis And Futuna
6 Sep 2005 8:03AM
I'll go with that, Covey.
Wink

Damn...and I thought it was the internet that encouraged people to build their own websites....and all the while it was digital cameras.
6 Sep 2005 8:11AM

Quote:Everybody who now owns a digi, believes they are good photographers because they can delete what they consider rubbish.
You only have to gleam from this site the vast amount of people setting up sites to sell images because they have(overnight) become great photographers...lol


Thats the danger of false encouragement. Honesty is always the best policy. I gave up believeing I could be more than an happy amateur a while ago, and as a result am much more reaslistic about the options open to me.
Bernie 17 2.2k
6 Sep 2005 8:12AM
Still if there is any money to be had from it by the general public then I suppose it's worth a look.
I may flood a load of these sites with images(I have no use for them) and sit back and wait for my 3 to roll in.
Nothing to lose really when you think about it.
PatrickSmith 16 1.2k 2 United States
6 Sep 2005 8:36AM
Yes K, to 'false encouragement' I would also add the resulting 'false self esteem.' I know that despite the encouragement I get here, that I have a LONG way to go before I would consider myself to be a great photographer. I have people everywhere telling me to sell my stuff. Co-workers have paid me to get 20x30's made of my images and people who visit their homes want to contact me. But it is easy to get fooled. Maybe after many years, or after I retire I will get income from photography, as I like it more than anything I've ever done. And yes, I'll probably set up my own website just for the heck of it. But I have a lot to learn. For now, it is just a lot of fun!

Patrick
mattw 17 5.2k 10 United Kingdom
6 Sep 2005 8:44AM
Wonder how many of the images on these Microstock websites have signed property/persion release forms?


Mattw
keithh 17 25.8k 33 Wallis And Futuna
6 Sep 2005 8:51AM
Is anyone bovvered?

I can't be bothered to be a)bothered. b) worried.
Smile
GlennH 16 1.9k 1 France
6 Sep 2005 9:05AM
Unconcerned, but not indifferent.

Okay, microstock hopefully won't kill anyone, but I hate Asda and Kwik-fit as well.
UserDeleted 18 3.6k
6 Sep 2005 11:13PM
Some thoughts and observations...

Barrie - Trying to educate the iliterate is a tough job. Whilst you most pros, and some amatuers, have invested the time to understand the business there are many amateurs who want to make some money that have not a clue how the business works - nor do they care to (which is the real problem). Trying to educate some people on this site (who ask the how much ? and how do I? questions) has been painfull to say the least - there are of course exceptions. If they don't understand why and only see the then it's fruitless trying to change behaviour. Get rich quick and a lack of respect are the order of the day.

K - You are a great photographer whatever your "status" Smile

Patrick - Programming is a commodity because it can be moved to the cheapest location and less so because of the shift in programming tools. Highly educated Indian, Chinese, Russian and Brazilian resources could handle old programming languages and tools as easily as they handle packages. Whilst digital photographic files can be moved around the globe in minutes the capture of those images is not as transferrable. Are you really going to travel 3500 miles to have a portrait shot, or are you going to import an Indian no name photographer to shoot your wedding ? Would you travel to Mauritius from the US to get a specific stock shot knowing that you will only sell it for $30 (and spend $3000 to get there). There should always be a market for high quality photography providing that image buyers and the general public continue to see a value in high quality work.

All - I see two problems here one of which is a trend, and one is just poor professionalism. The trend is for more digital images to be available. I accept the fact that photpgraphy as a profession will come under price pressure from entry level-DSLR toting amateurs. However, there is a limited market for low quality RF stock which will become saturated. Most HQ editorial and advertising usage will remain RM and that should remain a reasonable business because RM takes effort to price and manage and the businesses are not set up to handle this level of administration in their model.

The second issue here is the influx of inexperienced dotcom entrepeneurs entering the microstock market looking to take profit from the photographers lured by the promise of $$ from their everyday work. Their inability to set up a credible, well thought out business model, and a website that accurately reflects the offer, and comprehensively supports the photographer and no doubt the buyer does the industry no good - and hopefully in the long run will encourage buyers back to the established and professional libraries.


Mike.
Bernie 17 2.2k
7 Sep 2005 12:47AM

Quote:nor do they care to (which is the real problem).

Why should they??
Do you think of all the hundreds of redundant milkmen when you buy your carton at the supermarket?
In this day and age it's a case of looking after your own back.

If somebody approached me with a commission(not likely) do you really believe that I'm going to say "sorry you should offer it to a pro tog". I think not.
UserDeleted 18 3.6k
7 Sep 2005 1:10AM
No - but you might then come onto the site and ask everything from equipment selection to licencing and pricing and expect to have your questions answered from someone who does know this through education, apprenticeship or experience, or whine and moan if it doesn't turn out as you expected.

My point is that some of the people that do that are interested in learning and understanding, and other just want to take the advice, take a small amount of money and then move on.


Quote:In this day and age it's a case of looking after your own back.


Actually amongst professional photographers there is a lot of working together and looking after each others backs....

Mike.
strawman 17 22.2k 16 United Kingdom
7 Sep 2005 1:24AM
I can understand Mikes point very well. I think the gifted amature is the biggest loser in all this. The people who could do a bit of travel photography and sell the images to pay for the trips for example could be big losers in this change. The top tog's working to commisions will still be that.


Quote:If somebody approached me with a commission(not likely) do you really believe that I'm going to say "sorry you should offer it to a pro tog". I think not.


I did but then I must be stupid. Ok does 250 for taking a group photo and delivering back 60 framed large prints that afternoon sound OK.

I priced the job at my professional real world rate (not photography) then added the costs of a decent printing lab to produce the final article and came up with a price of 400. Print and framing was 200. 50 for me. Buggered if I would work @5 hrs and cover business overheads for 10 an hour before all the business costs are factored in. Probably be better of working in McDonalds.

Oh and I know my work is average etc and no problem with that. This work was offered on the basis of some basic support work I do for local activities where they could never dream of paying for a tog.

On turning it down I discovered the lowest pro rate was 400, some wanted 1,000. But it was flattering to be asked.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.