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Victoria Terrace, Edinburgh

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
ISO 200
f/6.3
1/30 seconds

This was the first picture I took and edited with my new camera.
It was taken just as it was starting to get dark.
I'm just looking for initial feedback as I often can't see flaws for looking at them!

Thanks Smile

Brand:OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Camera:Olympus PEN Lite E-PL5
Lens:OLYMPUS M.14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ii R
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:15 Oct 2013 - 6:00 PM
Focal Length:18mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/3.5
Aperture:f/6.3
Shutter Speed:1/30sec
Exposure Comp:-2.3
ISO:200
Exposure Mode:Aperture-priority AE
Metering Mode:Multi-segment
Flash:Auto, Did not fire
White Balance:Auto
Title:Victoria Terrace, Edinburgh
Username:TheChaoticScot TheChaoticScot
Uploaded:20 Nov 2013 - 7:14 PM
Tags:Architecture, Edinburgh
VS Mode Rating 104 (87.5% won)
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Views:118
Unique Views:55
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Comments

This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.
jacquig
jacquig  6 United Kingdom
20 Nov 2013 - 7:41 PM

Lovely tonal range and textures. Great first shot with your new camera! Smile

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dark_lord
dark_lord Critique Team 152363 forum postsdark_lord vcard England599 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2013 - 7:48 PM

On the whole I like this image. It's contrasty, but I like that, it give the image punch.
The saturation, especially of the yellows and oranges is rather strong and personally I would take it down just a wee bit.
I would try and lift a little detail from the shadow area on the left.
Talking of the left side, I would move that way just a bit to get the full umbrella and chairs in. This would also help cut out the (garish) scaffolding. Talking of scaffolding, it's so hard to avoid, and only last week I noticed some appear locally spoiling some shots I was planning to take.

However, I like the curve leading the eye through the image and up the street, despite it leading to the building site Smile
I also like the fact it's taken under darker conditions with the artificial light blending with the existing light, just the right time. A good amount of detail has been captured too.

Keith

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TheChaoticScot
20 Nov 2013 - 7:56 PM


Quote: Lovely tonal range and textures. Great first shot with your new camera! Smile

Thank you Jacqui! Smile

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TheChaoticScot
20 Nov 2013 - 7:59 PM


Quote: On the whole I like this image. It's contrasty, but I like that, it give the image punch.
The saturation, especially of the yellows and oranges is rather strong and personally I would take it down just a wee bit.
I would try and lift a little detail from the shadow area on the left.
Talking of the left side, I would move that way just a bit to get the full umbrella and chairs in. This would also help cut out the (garish) scaffolding. Talking of scaffolding, it's so hard to avoid, and only last week I noticed some appear locally spoiling some shots I was planning to take.

However, I like the curve leading the eye through the image and up the street, despite it leading to the building site Smile
I also like the fact it's taken under darker conditions with the artificial light blending with the existing light, just the right time. A good amount of detail has been captured too.

Keith

I do like a punchy picture and a lot of vivid colours but on reflection I agree that that the orangey, yellowish is a bit in your face and unfortunately draws more attention to that nasty scaffolding.

To lift the detail would you just bring up the exposure on that shadowy bit? I only have Lightroom at the moment but was thinking of investing in photoshop too. Worthwhile?

Thanks for your feedback, much appreciated Smile

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paulbroad

Do you mean you have processed this in the camera using inbuilt software. If so, best not to! The inbuilt software is usually far too agressive and lacks any real control. Quite a strong image but looks a bit like HDR, an image tonal map. The tonal range is compressed giving an over saturated feel and the white line between buildings and sky smacks of over processing.

So, not sure what you have done. Potentially a well composed sharp ikage. Not sure negative compensation was the way to go and not using that would have improved shadow detail. Possibly a bit of dodging in these areas at this stage.

Paul

Last Modified By paulbroad at 20 Nov 2013 - 9:05 PM

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TheChaoticScot
20 Nov 2013 - 9:10 PM


Quote: Do you mean you have processed this in the camera using inbuilt software. If so, best not to! The inbuilt software is usually far too agressive and lacks any real control. Quite a strong image but looks a bit like HDR, an image tonal map. The tonal range is compressed giving an over saturated feel and the white line between buildings and sky smacks of over processing.

So, not sure what you have done. Potentially a well composed sharp ikage. Not sure negative compensation was the way to go and not using that would have improved shadow detail. Possibly a bit of dodging in these areas at this stage.

Paul

No I didn't use any of the inbuilt software. I edited it in Lightroom.

I'm sure your comment is really helpful but "sharp ikage" and "negative compensate" is beyond this dummy's understanding.

Thanks anyway! Smile

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mrswoolybill
mrswoolybill Critique Team 131709 forum postsmrswoolybill vcard United Kingdom2099 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2013 - 9:39 PM

Hi Kay, welcome to the site and to the Critique Gallery, I see that this is your first upload.

First off, there's something about the light and the tones here that says Edinburgh quite unmistakably to me. It's those pink tones in dark granite, under street lighting. You've captured the character of the place.

I thought I knew this street pretty well but I've never looked up and noticed that continuous balcony at second floor level - amazing. You had a good vantage point up there, I like the way you have used the curve bottom left, it makes a classic lead-in, gives a route for the eye to explore.

Re Paul's comment -

Sharp image = it's very nicely in focus and there's no sign of camera-shake. If you were hand-holding rather than using a tripod you have a steady pair of hands!

Negative compensation - if you look just below the image, the site has picked up your Exif data - the details of your camera settings. It includes: Exposure Comp: -2.3. That means that your camera was set to under-expose by a very large margin!! I would actually expect the image to turn out much darker, you may have brought some brightness back when processing. Anyway, check over your settings, plus and minus exposure compensations can be very useful in some circumstances but you need to be in control!

Moira

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banehawi
banehawi Critique Team 152163 forum postsbanehawi vcard Canada4049 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2013 - 11:46 PM

Welcome to EPZ.


The image is underexposed, and thats, as mentioned, due to you selecting to underexpose it, accidentally or intentionally.

THis then kicks off a lot of other issues, such as the oversaturated colours, the dark left corner, the impression of being a HDR (High Dynamic Rang attempt.


The subject and scene are nice, and as the camera is new, its good to spend some time with the manual. What you have done suggests you are familair with a camera, and not a novice, but either way, Im sure you will get around to reading and understanding the controls.


I did upload a modification, - scroll up, click the modifications tab, and click the thumbnail and view it large, - thats the show with the exposure corrected to where it should have been. You might actually prefer it underexposed after al!



Enjoy the site


Regards


Willie

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mrswoolybill
mrswoolybill Critique Team 131709 forum postsmrswoolybill vcard United Kingdom2099 Constructive Critique Points
21 Nov 2013 - 8:21 AM

One more thing that I meant to include in my comment yesterday, further to:

Quote: If you were hand-holding rather than using a tripod you have a steady pair of hands!

Your camera was set to Aperture priority, ie you chose the size of the aperture, the camera calculated the necessary shutter speed. It gave you 1/30 second, which really is the slowest that you could get away with reliably, hand-holding, with your lens at nearly full width. If zooming in on a subject at 42mm aim for 1/100 second or faster. (The longer the lens, the harder it becomes to hold steadily, the faster the shutter speed needed).

With Aperture priority, there is always the risk that the light will drop, so the exposure time will increase, and you will find yourself trying to hand-hold steadily at an impossibly slow shutter speed without noticing! Always keep an eye on the shutter speed if not using a tripod.
Moira

Last Modified By mrswoolybill at 21 Nov 2013 - 8:24 AM

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TheChaoticScot
21 Nov 2013 - 11:26 AM


Quote: Hi Kay, welcome to the site and to the Critique Gallery, I see that this is your first upload.

First off, there's something about the light and the tones here that says Edinburgh quite unmistakably to me. It's those pink tones in dark granite, under street lighting. You've captured the character of the place.

I thought I knew this street pretty well but I've never looked up and noticed that continuous balcony at second floor level - amazing. You had a good vantage point up there, I like the way you have used the curve bottom left, it makes a classic lead-in, gives a route for the eye to explore.

Re Paul's comment -

Sharp image = it's very nicely in focus and there's no sign of camera-shake. If you were hand-holding rather than using a tripod you have a steady pair of hands!

Negative compensation - if you look just below the image, the site has picked up your Exif data - the details of your camera settings. It includes: Exposure Comp: -2.3. That means that your camera was set to under-expose by a very large margin!! I would actually expect the image to turn out much darker, you may have brought some brightness back when processing. Anyway, check over your settings, plus and minus exposure compensations can be very useful in some circumstances but you need to be in control!

Moira

Aaaaaah, it all makes sense now Moira.

A wee birdie told me once that in order to keep the detail in the sky, it's a good idea to really underexpose, as you can always lift the shadows when you edit. Perhaps on this occasion it was a bit extreme?

The saturation and HDR was intentional, but I realise it was just too much in this instance. I've definitely toned it down since then!

I was using a tripod as there's no way I would've been able to keep my hands so still.

I am still trying to get my head around all the controls when shooting in low light. It definitely still confuses. I'll get there though.

Thanks so much Smile

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TheChaoticScot
21 Nov 2013 - 11:29 AM


Quote: Welcome to EPZ.


The image is underexposed, and thats, as mentioned, due to you selecting to underexpose it, accidentally or intentionally.

THis then kicks off a lot of other issues, such as the oversaturated colours, the dark left corner, the impression of being a HDR (High Dynamic Rang attempt.


The subject and scene are nice, and as the camera is new, its good to spend some time with the manual. What you have done suggests you are familair with a camera, and not a novice, but either way, Im sure you will get around to reading and understanding the controls.


I did upload a modification, - scroll up, click the modifications tab, and click the thumbnail and view it large, - thats the show with the exposure corrected to where it should have been. You might actually prefer it underexposed after al!



Enjoy the site


Regards


Willie

Hi Willie,

I replied to this comment in half of my reply to Moira, got myself confused with who was saying what.

I think my taste is more inclined towards the underexposed version but thanks for your advice and I'll definitely be more conscious of underexposing my photos in future.

Cheers Smile

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mrswoolybill
mrswoolybill Critique Team 131709 forum postsmrswoolybill vcard United Kingdom2099 Constructive Critique Points
21 Nov 2013 - 12:54 PM


Quote: A wee birdie told me once that in order to keep the detail in the sky, it's a good idea to really underexpose, as you can always lift the shadows when you edit. Perhaps on this occasion it was a bit extreme?

A little information can sometimes be a dangerous thing... Generally speaking it is easier to work on a slightly underexposed picture than on slightly overexposed, and I often set minus 0.3 or 0.7 stop. Maths is not my strong point, but every time that you reduce by a stop you are effectively halving the amount of light that gets into the camera. Minus 2.3 is a very large factor - I like my images dark but I've rarely gone that far!

Equally there are many occasions when you need to consider a plus factor - eg if you are photographing a subject against a bright background, looking up into the sky for example, and the camera would otherwise be deceived by the light into underexposing.

You need to consider the actual circumstances. Don't set off with a large preset compensation, look at the light and consider what is actually needed. Light is everything in photography, the word means drawing with light, and we need to always be very aware of what it is doing.

Great feedback from you by the way, thank you! It's good to know that someone is actually reading what we write, and thinking about it!
Moira

Last Modified By mrswoolybill at 21 Nov 2013 - 12:57 PM

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paulbroad

Thanks for translation, Moira, finger trouble on a tablet on screen keyboard. Not meant for my tubby little fingers.

Paul

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mrstefbrown
21 Nov 2013 - 4:00 PM

In my opinion i prefer the original image with the bright colours as opposed to the modified image that seems to of had the colour taken out of it. Lovely pic kay, i really like it.

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Mike43
Mike43  894 forum posts England21 Constructive Critique Points
21 Nov 2013 - 4:26 PM

There is a picture in there somewhere, have uploaded a mod with a SQ,ish format (actually looking at it I don,t think it works either) but I do like the blend of the railings leading you on into the picture.
By the looks of the first shot from the Camera there is a future full of great shots to come.
Mike.

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TheChaoticScot
22 Nov 2013 - 11:43 AM


Quote: In my opinion i prefer the original image with the bright colours as opposed to the modified image that seems to of had the colour taken out of it. Lovely pic kay, i really like it.

Thanks Stef! I'm a rather colourful character myself and this translates in to my photos. I prefer it with more colour Smile

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TheChaoticScot
22 Nov 2013 - 11:44 AM


Quote: There is a picture in there somewhere, have uploaded a mod with a SQ,ish format (actually looking at it I don,t think it works either) but I do like the blend of the railings leading you on into the picture.
By the looks of the first shot from the Camera there is a future full of great shots to come.
Mike.

Thanks Mike. I usually have the eye for a decent picture, but the skills are sometimes lacking!

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TheChaoticScot
22 Nov 2013 - 11:45 AM


Quote: A wee birdie told me once that in order to keep the detail in the sky, it's a good idea to really underexpose, as you can always lift the shadows when you edit. Perhaps on this occasion it was a bit extreme?
A little information can sometimes be a dangerous thing... Generally speaking it is easier to work on a slightly underexposed picture than on slightly overexposed, and I often set minus 0.3 or 0.7 stop. Maths is not my strong point, but every time that you reduce by a stop you are effectively halving the amount of light that gets into the camera. Minus 2.3 is a very large factor - I like my images dark but I've rarely gone that far!

Equally there are many occasions when you need to consider a plus factor - eg if you are photographing a subject against a bright background, looking up into the sky for example, and the camera would otherwise be deceived by the light into underexposing.

You need to consider the actual circumstances. Don't set off with a large preset compensation, look at the light and consider what is actually needed. Light is everything in photography, the word means drawing with light, and we need to always be very aware of what it is doing.

Great feedback from you by the way, thank you! It's good to know that someone is actually reading what we write, and thinking about it!
Moira

I reckon you're only good as the knowledge and information you're given, so I plan to make good use of all this helpful feedback Smile

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