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11th July

By cats_123  
Good Morning epzers...today is a Bank Holiday in NI...mainly a day off work for everyone to sober up or put down their petrol bombs and lumps of concrete!!!

On the 11th, there are many `homemade' bonfires, some of enormous height built of wooden pallets and tyres (probably nicked off local vehicles!!!!), but the NI powers now also `pay' minority groups to hold their celebrations using olympic like cauldrons (propane gas powered) which are hauled in a few hours before. We are `priveleged' to get a ring side seat in our village.......

This is/was my first serious attempt at longer shutter speeds. Unfortunately I couldn't find all the bits to my tripod, so the camera was propped up on my garden wall.

Am reasonably pleased with the outcomes (apart rom the lens flare from the `bonfire'. I could probably have cloned it out, but it somehow seems to fit? The fireworks were mainly white, but gave everyone a pleasing display.



Quote:In Northern Ireland, the Eleventh Night or 11th Night refers to the night before the Twelfth of July, an annual Protestant commemoration of the Battle of the Boyne (12 July 1690). On this night, large towering bonfires are lit in many Protestant, unionist and loyalist communities in Northern Ireland.[1] It is also known as "bonfire night", in common with other events in which bonfires are lit.[2][3][4] The bonfires are mostly made with wooden pallets and often built as large as possible.



Thanks for looking in...GrinGrinGrin


Todaycast: Dull and overcast, but will no doubt brighten up later....no rain in sight for a few days - which is unheard of in this part of the world!! WinkGrinGrin

Tags: Fireworks Photo journalism Bonfire Northern ireland Millisle 11th July

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Comments


rontear Plus
19 23 9 England
15 Jul 2013 9:38AM
Action captured Jeff, perhaps more explosions required, these look slightly lost. But effective.
Ron.
Hermanus 9 4 South Africa
15 Jul 2013 9:44AM
Interesting write up Jeff - and excellent photos I must add Smile Who needs a tripod if your garden wall works so well Smile
johnlw 15 1 10 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2013 10:28AM
Yes I use a tripod a garden wall a tree stump an old fence post as long as its in the right place it should do the job.
As you say there isn't much colour but what what there is you made a great job of capturing.
Well done.
Regards John.
nonur 13 18 13 Turkey
15 Jul 2013 10:30AM
Nice night-shots and great info, Jeff.
NDODS Plus
11 5.3k 128 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2013 10:46AM
A great effort Jeff, but as you will have learnt capturing fireworks is a tricky job, and all too often many people are quick to offer you advice on how to master this particular genre. Below is some tips which I found very useful after a rather unsuccessful first attempt at capturing these wonderful pyrotechnics.

Fireworks are fairly unpredictable. You know they're going to explode but you can never quite tell exactly where... or when.

Your camera also has no idea where the fireworks are to focus or what the brightness is going to be like to ensure the correct exposure. So the trick is to follow our few guidelines.
Whatever camera you are using you need to have it set to infinity because the fireworks will be further than the maximum focus setting of the camera. With manual focus cameras this is easy. With cameras that have an infinity setting (mountain symbol on the menu) it's also easy, and even with fully autofocus models you may be able to get round the problem. You could try to focus on a distant subject first and lock the focus by half pressing down on the shutter button. Then reposition ready to take the photo.

Set the camera's white balance to daylight if you shoot JPEGs. With RAW you can tweak colours later.

Next is the exposure. Fireworks are bright and metering from the dark sky would cause vast overexposure. They are also not around long enough for the camera to get a correct reading when the burst occurs, so the best thing to do is select your exposure beforehand. Again cameras with manual mode help here. With an auto only camera you will struggle to get a good photo. Make sure for starters that the flash is turned off (lightning symbol inside no entry sign).

Then if you have a camera with exposure control select f/8 or f/11 (it's worth experimenting at both apertures) The shutter speed needs to be long enough to capture the whole explosion and light trails. Somewhere between one and four seconds is often enough but some fireworks need a little longer, some slightly less.

It pays to watch the first few bursts to gauge what sort of display is being given, where the fireworks are being launched in the sky and how long they stay open. With all this knowledge it's easier to frame, focus and expose.

A shutter speed of around a second means you cannot hold the camera steady so the first thing to do is rest the camera on a solid surface to prevent camera shake during the exposure. A tripod is the best platform, but you could use the trunk of a tree, a fence or a wall. If you use a tripod attach a cable-release to the camera to avoid any movement caused by pressure on the shutter release.

Now the framing. You've already worked out where the burst are going to be. You now have to open the shutter at the right moment and which lens? If you use a telephoto you will struggle to pick the point where the firework bursts open, so a wider angle of around 35mm will be better. In most cases it's best to turn the camera on its side too so the photo is in portrait format. Then you can record the single bright ignited firework as it flies up into the sky and then as it breaks out.

Also try the multi-burst technique. Cover the lens after one burst and then uncover it for a several more bursts as they happen so you fill you photo with multiple explosions. This is tricky but the pictures can be brilliant if you get it right. Use a sheet of black card that you can place in front of the lens without touching it to prevent camera shake.

Regards NathanGrinGrinGrin
cats_123 Plus
18 5.1k 30 Northern Ireland
15 Jul 2013 11:24AM

Quote:A great effort Jeff, but as you will have learnt capturing fireworks is a tricky job, and all too often many people are quick to offer you advice on how to master this particular genre. Below is some tips which I found very useful after a rather unsuccessful first attempt at capturing these wonderful pyrotechnics.

Fireworks are fairly unpredictable. You know they're going to explode but you can never quite tell exactly where... or when.

Your camera also has no idea where the fireworks are to focus or what the brightness is going to be like to ensure the correct exposure. So the trick is to follow our few guidelines.
Whatever camera you are using you need to have it set to infinity because the fireworks will be further than the ymaximum focus setting of the camera. With manual focus cameras this is easy. With cameras that have an infinity setting (mountain symbol on the menu) it's also easy, and even with fully autofocus models you may be able to get round the problem. You could try to focus on a distant subject first and lock the focus by half pressing down on the shutter button. Then reposition ready to take the photo.

Set the camera's white balance to daylight if you shoot JPEGs. With RAW you can tweak colours later.

Next is the exposure. Fireworks are bright and metering from the dark sky would cause vast overexposure. They are also not around long enough for the camera to get a correct reading when the burst occurs, so the best thing to do is select your exposure beforehand. Again cameras with manual mode help here. With an auto only camera you will struggle to get a good photo. Make sure for starters that the flash is turned off (lightning symbol inside no entry sign).

Then if you have a camera with exposure control select f/8 or f/11 (it's worth experimenting at both apertures) The shutter speed needs to be long enough to capture the whole explosion and light trails. Somewhere between one and four seconds is often enough but some fireworks need a little longer, some slightly less.

It pays to watch the first few bursts to gauge what sort of display is being given, where the fireworks are being launched in the sky and how long they stay open. With all this knowledge it's easier to frame, focus and expose.

A shutter speed of around a second means you cannot hold the camera steady so the first thing to do is rest the camera on a solid surface to prevent camera shake during the exposure. A tripod is the best platform, but you could use the trunk of a tree, a fence or a wall. If you use a tripod attach a cable-release to the camera to avoid any movement caused by pressure on the shutter release.

Now the framing. You've already worked out where the burst are going to be. You now have to open the shutter at the right moment and which lens? If you use a telephoto you will struggle to pick the point where the firework bursts open, so a wider angle of around 35mm will be better. In most cases it's best to turn the camera on its side too so the photo is in portrait format. Then you can record the single bright ignited firework as it flies up into the sky and then as it breaks out.

Also try the multi-burst technique. Cover the lens after one burst and then uncover it for a several more bursts as they happen so you fill you photo with multiple explosions. This is tricky but the pictures can be brilliant if you get it right. Use a sheet of black card that you can place in front of the lens without touching it to prevent camera shake.

Regards NathanGrinGrinGrin

Nathan.... thank you so much for taking the time to set this out....I'll try to take it all on board Smile Smile
mikbee 15 3 8 Scotland
15 Jul 2013 11:51AM
Nice to see some ''official'' fireworks instead of all that carry on I have seen on the news recently.
And the last time I used my tripod was to hammer in some loose nails on my garden hut !!
Mick.
Tish1 Plus
9 32 5 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2013 1:07PM
Nathan's on fire today, pardon the pun................ great write up Jeff, I am still coming to your house, it is in a great location. I have to say I like your first attempt at fire works, I am far too much of a coward to attempt such, but now, you have lit the touch paper, I'm thinking, get in training for Bon Fire night and then New Years.

Tish
SlowSong Plus
13 10.3k 30 England
15 Jul 2013 1:08PM
What a nice view you have from your home. And some good tips their from Nathan. I've learned something too. Smile
(I had to laugh about you losing your bits. I didn't know tripods came in bits, mine don't. Grin)
cats_123 Plus
18 5.1k 30 Northern Ireland
15 Jul 2013 2:43PM

Quote:What a nice view you have from your home. And some good tips their from Nathan. I've learned something too. Smile
(I had to laugh about you losing your bits. I didn't know tripods came in bits, mine don't. Grin)

Probably more like losing my marbles...GrinGrinGrinBlushBlush but I'm short of the bit at the top that screws into the camera...gawd knows where it is, and my tripod is so antiquated that they stopped making them in 2002!!! Probably easier to but a new one Sad
Nikonuser1 Plus
9 172 16 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2013 2:56PM
A nice series Jeff, a great intro,Smile some good tips from Nathan, will store away for later use.

Cliff
capto Plus
10 7.0k 31 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2013 3:07PM
An excellent set.Smile

ivor
richmowil Plus
13 484 2 England
15 Jul 2013 4:30PM
Its worth a tick for the humour/banter!! also the images Jeff!!
SUE118 Plus
13 8 1 United Kingdom
15 Jul 2013 8:20PM
A lovely sparkly shot.
widtink 9 406 2 Scotland
15 Jul 2013 8:49PM
Cracking shots these Jeff , plenty o fireworks in Ireland at the moment thats for sure SmileSmile

Rod
15 Jul 2013 10:04PM
Fine selection, do like V2. Agree that the lens flare adds rather than detracts from the images.

Richard
accipiter 12 61 England
17 Jul 2013 5:31AM
I like them especially v1 - some nice ghosts as well. A

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