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A taste of honey.

By davetac  
Olympus OM 30 and Miranda 24mm f2.8 lens plus Ilford HP5 400 film

Tags: Wildlife Nature Film Daisy Insect Black and white

Comments


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dudler Plus
16 927 1516 England
30 Aug 2019 6:52PM
I wonder if the rest of the Critique Team have left this for me, because I still use film, and subscribe to the idea of Film Friday?

I find that the big problem is scanning prints, slides or negatives - they always seem ot lose a bit of sharpness, and prints lose deep blacks. I wonder how you scanned this shot? The EXIF is silent with film, of course. This looks rather grey, but it's hard to increase contrast without losing tone in both black and white areas. I've done my best in the mod.

The process also seems to boost grain: unless this is from a small part of the frame, it's grainier than HP5 ever was in ordinary developers...

I've done a mod,as best i can - and (if you haven't already done this) experiment with scanning, and scan at higher resolution than you think you need if you are workign from film.

But I'm making assumptions - you haven't said, in fact, whether it's the technical or the aesthetic side causing a post in the Critique Gallery...

chase Plus
14 1.2k 259 England
30 Aug 2019 7:43PM

Quote:But I'm making assumptions - you haven't said, in fact, whether it's the technical or the aesthetic side causing a post in the Critique Gallery...

Without actually knowing why you wanted critique on this it's hard to give.
John has done the film bit, I would try with the subject but as I said it's difficult without knowing .
If this were my image I would crop possibly crop to portrait format which would put more focus on the Bee and flower and lose the part flower to the left of the frame.
davetac Plus
10 66 2 United Kingdom
30 Aug 2019 8:06PM
Thanks guys. I was a film user many moons ago then stopped taking pictures altogether in the eighties. For the last 15 years I'm been exclusively digital so I am a virtual newbie with film.
I've been shopping around as regards film developers but have been disappointed with the lack of contrast and prevalence of grain.
Composition wise I can see the shortcomings with the image but since the scan was at 5mb (interpolated to 10mb) I'm reluctant to over crop.
I guess what I'm looking for in critique is an indication of wether the low contrast before processing is what I should expect or perhaps I'm over/under exposing? Same with the grain, am I expecting too much?
I've added a straight scan image and one after adjustment in Lightroom.
I'm probably going to star processing my own film soon and hope for better results later. Or maybe go with a C-41 film like XP2 first.
pablophotographer 8 1.2k 351
30 Aug 2019 11:21PM
I like the crop and the tones but thank you for uploading the original.

I was wondering in the beginning: "am I failing to recognise a 3:2: frame?"
I have known photographers who shoot colour film (Fujicolor C200) develop it in C-41 and then turned to black and white digitally.

Composition-wise I notice flowers on the diagonal line from top right corner to left bottom corner. I would have aligned these flowers top to bottom and have the flower of the left top corner on the left side and in full. That would leave an empty right side -empty of flowers, not leaves- which I would crop without much hesitation.

pablophotographer

dudler Plus
16 927 1516 England
31 Aug 2019 10:41AM
Hi again, Dave.

It's ahrd to say without seeing yoru negatives. Contrast is a function of film type, developer type and freshness, and various other factors. The crucial ones are developing time and temperature - if the contrast is low, warmer or longer.

Tell me about the kit you're using, and how you achieve temperature control in processing, and I can make suggestions. Also - what developer?

My own feeling is that C-41 is copping out, but I have a friend who loved it. The whole thing is geared to an optimal result, and harder to tune to your needs.

There are some sepcialist firms selling film, developer, accessories, and even processing - see my interview with the managing director of one of them, HERE.

Exposure also matters a lot - underexposure is worse than overexposure with negative film, so it's no bad thing to expose HP5+ at 250 ISO.

The grain is far greater than I'd expect - but could, aprtly, be an artefact of the scanning.

Could you take a shot of some negatives against a bright background, and upload as a mod to this shot? That might give me a basis for assessing things. As close as you can get, maybe taped to a window with bright sky behind?
davetac Plus
10 66 2 United Kingdom
1 Sep 2019 12:57PM

Quote:It's ahrd to say without seeing yoru negatives. Contrast is a function of film type, developer type and freshness, and various other factors. The crucial ones are developing time and temperature - if the contrast is low, warmer or longer.

Tell me about the kit you're using, and how you achieve temperature control in processing, and I can make suggestions. Also - what developer?

My own feeling is that C-41 is copping out, but I have a friend who loved it. The whole thing is geared to an optimal result, and harder to tune to your needs.

There are some sepcialist firms selling film, developer, accessories, and even processing - see my interview with the managing director of one of them, HERE.

Exposure also matters a lot - underexposure is worse than overexposure with negative film, so it's no bad thing to expose HP5+ at 250 ISO.

The grain is far greater than I'd expect - but could, aprtly, be an artefact of the scanning.

Could you take a shot of some negatives against a bright background, and upload as a mod to this shot? That might give me a basis for assessing things. As close as you can get, maybe taped to a window with bright sky behind?
/quote]



Thanks for the kind advice. At the moment I'm not developing my own negatives but may soon take a local course on the subject so stand by.
I have had the films processed at 4 different labs. Bayeux in London were by far best but very expensive. I think in the near future I'll be DI Ying. It's the only way I think.

paulbroad Plus
12 131 1285 United Kingdom
1 Sep 2019 6:39PM
Everyone to their own! I used film from 1962 to 2001, then went digital. I will never use another roll of film. I understand why people might want to, but you are adding so many possible problems. Scanning is a skill in it's own right, I've done a lot.

Contrast usually increases, sharpness reduces, resolution depends on degree of final enlargement required and original size. Interpolation reduces quality and must be avoided!

I'm afraid the quality of your image has little gong for it and no possibility of improvement. Grain is high and tones flat. Mon is not to be recommended for natural history types of image.

paul

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