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Antique Cars #16

By handlerstudio  
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This was taken a few years ago....and antique that it is or was, I suspect could still be on the road. I was impressed with the nostalgic responses to the Bubble Car image I had yesterday.....I suspect that, for those who live and grew up in Europe, the 2CV may elicit some of those same feelings. This is the only Deux Cheveaux truck I have ever seen, and it is a beauty.

Thank you Richard (estonian) for your UA for the Bubble Car.

Sixteen days and counting. I suspect that even across the water, The Tyrant's phone call to the election official in Georgia (the state not the country) probably made news.....this, he might actually be able to be prosecuted for later....suborning election fraud.

Be well and healthy friends.

Peter

Tags: Photo journalism Antique cars The Tyrant Deux Cheval

Voters: pablophotographer, debu, banehawi and 33 more

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Comments


pablophotographer 9 1.8k 405
5 Jan 2021 2:58AM
It looks well cared for. 😎
debu 11 India
5 Jan 2021 3:25AM
Great capture.
Debu
5 Jan 2021 5:19AM
A lovely set of this iconic old work-horse, Peter.
Sixteen days!!!
Mike
dales Plus
5 11 Australia
5 Jan 2021 7:56AM
Excellent images of this beauty Peter !
Ian
saltireblue Plus
10 11.8k 75 Norway
5 Jan 2021 8:00AM

Quote: This is the only Deux Cheval truck I have ever seen

The correct name is Deux Chevaux (Two Horses)...
dudler Plus
17 1.6k 1832 England
5 Jan 2021 8:05AM
Georgia's elections made the news here, even though there was also an announcement of a further national lockdown in England. Rather late, but the right thing to do.

The 2CV definitely brings back memories: designed to be able to carry a pig across a ploughed field (as you do...) they are idiosyncratic but effective. Thoroughly economical, scary to be driven in, but remarkably competent in a way that bubble cars weren't, I think.

Citroen were mass-market pioneers of front wheel drive, much later taken up by Austin-Morris with the Mini and various other innovative models: arguably, it was British FWD cars that turned the tide - as late as the Seventies, Ford maintained it was a silly way to build a car...
viscostatic 14 49 10 United Kingdom
5 Jan 2021 8:57AM
A beautiful vehicle. People used to laugh at them. They are worth a lot of money now.

Phil.
5 Jan 2021 9:04AM
Excellent set Peter, lead a slight favourite,
Fred.
Nikonuser1 Plus
8 166 16 United Kingdom
5 Jan 2021 9:15AM
A great set PeterSmileSmile

Cliff
richmowil Plus
12 446 2 England
5 Jan 2021 9:36AM
Two good images Peter!
5 Jan 2021 10:42AM
Another beauty Peter.
I used to love those French cars with the corrugated metal panels. i had a friend who had a 2CV and it turned heads wherever she went in it. There was something wonderfully idiosyncratic about some French cars. Do you remember the CitroŽn DS with its Hydropneumatic suspension? The engine was started and then they rose sedately into a higher position before setting off. When I lived in Uganda in the early 70s the Renault 4 was highly prized by the poorer ex-pats (like me) because they had a very high clearance and the roads weren't paved. (Rocks taking your sump out was not uncommon) They also had an extraordinary gear lever which was like an umbrella handle.
Mike
dudler Plus
17 1.6k 1832 England
5 Jan 2021 1:01PM
Ahhh... The dashboard gearchange: my best friend had a Renault 6, and the mechanism linking the handle sticking out of the dashboard to the gearbox involved a steel rod running the length of the engine bay, just below bonnet level, and attached to mysterious things heading downwards.

Watching any of that sort of French car corner at speed was interesting - there are rumours that the doorhandles could graze the ground! Supple suspension, surprising levels of grip, and an entrepreneurial driving style - preferably while puffing on a Gauloise...
5 Jan 2021 1:55PM
Great images
Daisymaye Plus
12 23 19 Canada
5 Jan 2021 2:23PM
Very cool looking vehicle.
Mollycat Plus
7 21 2 United Kingdom
5 Jan 2021 2:24PM
It can deliver to me anytime Peter. Various stories on why the 2CV was made. The one I like is that it
had to be able to cross a ploughed field loaded with eggs and not break any.
Peter
Chinga Plus
10 3 2 United Kingdom
5 Jan 2021 3:59PM
This one is very special... Lovely face in V1 peter...
A very loved and coveted car in Portugal... Isabel GrinGrinGrin
Sometimes it's all in the name too. CitroŽn pretty much meant lemon to anyone over here. The Chevy Nova had to change its name to sell in Latin American because No va in Spanish means it doesn't go.Then there were those tiny cars like the Austin Mini that really didn't go anywhere except in the ditch in our Canadian winters. That's assuming they made it out of the driveway.

What a God sent the front wheel drives were to winter driving. No fun to be going one way and the next thing you know you've done a one eighty in the middle of the road.

Oh...ah ... Super capture, Peter.
6 Jan 2021 12:07AM

Quote:
Quote: This is the only Deux Cheval truck I have ever seen

The correct name is Deux Chevaux (Two Horses)...



Thank you. I stand corrected.

Peter
6 Jan 2021 12:10AM

Quote:Another beauty Peter.
I used to love those French cars with the corrugated metal panels. i had a friend who had a 2CV and it turned heads wherever she went in it. There was something wonderfully idiosyncratic about some French cars. Do you remember the CitroŽn DS with its Hydropneumatic suspension? The engine was started and then they rose sedately into a higher position before setting off. When I lived in Uganda in the early 70s the Renault 4 was highly prized by the poorer ex-pats (like me) because they had a very high clearance and the roads weren't paved. (Rocks taking your sump out was not uncommon) They also had an extraordinary gear lever which was like an umbrella handle.
Mike




I think the Citroen DS was a car WAY ahead of its time. It was an extraordinarily technologically innovative car.

Peter
6 Jan 2021 12:13AM

Quote:Sometimes it's all in the name too. CitroŽn pretty much meant lemon to anyone over here. The Chevy Nova had to change its name to sell in Latin American because No va in Spanish means it doesn't go.Then there were those tiny cars like the Austin Mini that really didn't go anywhere except in the ditch in our Canadian winters. That's assuming they made it out of the driveway.

What a God sent the front wheel drives were to winter driving. No fun to be going one way and the next thing you know you've done a one eighty in the middle of the road.

Oh...ah ... Super capture, Peter.



Yeah, when I lived in Upstate New York in the winter, if you were driving a Bug, which got great traction with the engine over the rear wheels....if you were driving down a road at all slippery, you could not totally let off on the accelerator or the rear end might want to become the front end....you could get enough engine braking to break the rear end loose. But they were very reliable.

Peter
6 Jan 2021 12:54AM

Quote:Georgia's elections made the news here, even though there was also an announcement of a further national lockdown in England. Rather late, but the right thing to do.

The 2CV definitely brings back memories: designed to be able to carry a pig across a ploughed field (as you do...) they are idiosyncratic but effective. Thoroughly economical, scary to be driven in, but remarkably competent in a way that bubble cars weren't, I think.

Citroen were mass-market pioneers of front wheel drive, much later taken up by Austin-Morris with the Mini and various other innovative models: arguably, it was British FWD cars that turned the tide - as late as the Seventies, Ford maintained it was a silly way to build a car...



And they had these tiny little engines....

Peter
woolybill1 Plus
14 37 77 United Kingdom
6 Jan 2021 9:42AM
Let's not forget the CitroŽn Traction Avant, the grown-up antecedent of the 2CV made from 1934 to 1957 with engines ranging from 1.3 to 2.9 litres, Not so big as a Cord though more influential for the mass market.

Permit me a 2CV anecdote: in August 1969 Moira and I were on a course at Grenoble University. The lecture halls were baking inside, worse than the outdoor sun, and the lectures uninspiring; at the weekends we hitch-hiked to tour the Alpes Maritimes, travel to the Med along the Route Napolťon and cross the Petit St Bernard pass into Italy. More than half our lifts were in 2CVs, of course (and plenty of Renault 4s and Simca 1100s, with a smattering of trucks and a solitary Jag) . . . . anyway, in those days the French were known to treat their cars with utter neglect, as they would have treated the donkeys they replaced; this applied specially to the 2CV.
One driver stood out because a glance round the cockpit revealed a full complement of levers, knobs, buttons and leather straps of which a pristine 2CV is composed. I took the plunge and commented on the fact that it was all there, to which he responded:
That is very kind of you, but you have completely the wrong idea. When you first buy a 2CV the first thing that happens when you get it home is that everything falls off. What you see in my car is that I have put it all back again !
7 Jan 2021 12:17PM
French chic--great images, Peter

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