Back Modifications (2)
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Bridling

By Merlin_k    
I am trying to capture the essence of riding with a series of images. This is one Original uploaded.

Tags: Horse Riding Bridle Pets and captive animals

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This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.

Comments


13 Aug 2017 1:02AM
SmileSmileSmileSmileSmile

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dudler Plus
14 560 1135 England
13 Aug 2017 7:12AM
It's reasonably effective, and your processing (increased saturation, maybe a Nik filter?) works. Bringing out the detail.

I'd have wanted to do two things to make the most of it. First, a tripod, so I could stop the lens down for front-to-back sharpness. The detail, again.

Second, a whole range of different viewpoints and orientations. Flat on (aperture wouldn't be so important, then), looking along the hangers horizontally, looking up from floor level. Some of these wouldn't work, but it's worth trying. Always work the scene.
Merlin_k Plus
8 10 11 United States
13 Aug 2017 1:10PM
I actually didn't use the Nik for this one. My apologies because I normal add the post processing to the description when I upload but I was in a bit of a rush with family pressure. I changed the tone curve to strong contrast, bright down the highlights a bit, increased the clarity and saturation, plus increased sharpness.
Whether I can take a tripod there I am not sure. Busy working stables, but I will ask. Because I realize that one of many faults is that I don't work a scene. It's a bad habit, one that again I think is born of family pressure. It's not the most sociable hobby, photography!
The aperture was a purposeful decision, I want a fade to the focus. But again, that's a fault, I get stuck in a rut of what I like. And I quite like fade. But I need to learn that different situations call for different technique.
Thanks for the advice, its important to remember that it's not all about technique but as much attitude and the mental process of photography.
pamelajean Plus
11 998 1932 United Kingdom
13 Aug 2017 3:47PM
I like this. Concentrating on the details, getting to the point.

You have the focus you wanted, and you can obviously hold the camera steady, at that shutter speed.
I think your "fade" technique works well for this image.

I personally like as much sharpness as possible, but have learnt to appreciate selective focus and shallow dof over the years.
It works because the bridle nearest to the camera is separate from the focused one in the middle, so the viewer's eye immediately settles in the middle, with nothing to stop it, because they don't overlap.
It works rather like a row of the same subject, or something like fence railings, can work, using perspective and selective focus. This is because we know what is in the front and at the end, it's the same. Here, all the hanging things are bridles (at least, I hope that's right), and so we don't need to be distracted by the unfocused ones.
Am I making any sense?

As for "working the scene", it's always a good idea to use different formats and different angles, then you can decide, at your leisure at home, which you like the best. I'm sure we have all wished we had done this at times......the "if only" syndrome.

I might have chosen not to include the first two hangers, filling the frame with bridles, but have to admit that your composition works.

Pamela.
13 Aug 2017 4:03PM
I agree with Pamela, and like it the way it is. SmileSmileSmile Don't be so hard on yourself, it's the journey not the destination.
Merlin_k Plus
8 10 11 United States
13 Aug 2017 4:09PM
Actually the second in (the first one where you can see the hanger) is a girth, but it is leather and horsey.
I am getting better at working the scene. Luckily here I can go back, as I was able to with the recent series in the ruined turboprop plane. But I do spend a lot of time wishing I had tried a different lens or angle.
banehawi Plus
13 1.6k 3707 Canada
13 Aug 2017 4:45PM
Using 105mm will give shallower dof, which I think is another approach.

Ive loaded a mod suggesting shallower focus.


W
dark_lord Plus
13 2.0k 440 England
13 Aug 2017 9:33PM
I like this and you've done a good job with your processing, enhancing what's there and not going over the top.
Perhaps we all think of Nik these days but there's so much that 'normal' software like Lightroom and Photoshop can do to bring an image to life without going over the top (though you can if you want, of course!).

My first thought was to go for a narrow zone of sharpness as in Willie's mod. But that's just one interpretation and the other suggestions given are all valid approaches, neither better or worse. It depends on how you want to interpret the scene and other viewers will have their own preferences.
It all comes down to working the subject.

We all come back from a shoot wishing we'd tried something else at the time.
I did that myself just a couple of weeks ago and I'd got the other lens with me too.
dudler Plus
14 560 1135 England
15 Aug 2017 8:43PM
Thanks for the thoughtful and introspective feedback, Merlin!

A dialogue... Satisfying - and I hope that's so on both sides.
Merlin_k Plus
8 10 11 United States
15 Aug 2017 9:55PM
I think dialogue is what makes this critique section so valuable. And if you are willing to kindly give of your time to guide us then it is only polite to let you know what impact that advice has.
I thank all you critique team for a fantastic job.

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