Back Modifications (1)
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Gone Fishin' 2

By LuckyShot
A day at Lame Mead when the water was so calm it actually looked like glass.

Tags: Relaxing Landscape and travel

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This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.

Comments


paulbroad 9 117 1075 United Kingdom
21 Aug 2013 8:12PM
Amusing indeed. Not bad for a phone but you are a bit over exposed. There should be an exposure compensation feature on these modern phones. You need half a stop less att least.

Paul

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chase Plus
11 1.1k 246 England
22 Aug 2013 6:33PM
I like this idea & this image made me smile.
Difficult to cope with the exposure differences on a phone but you have done a fair job here.As Paul has said,just a wee bit over exposed on the landscape...but I do like the fact I can see the feet of the fisherman.
I would have got rid of the partial black line at the top right of the frame..the crop tool is your friend.
pamelajean Plus
10 969 1846 United Kingdom
22 Aug 2013 7:43PM
Hello, Clayton, and welcome to EPZ.

The image evokes feelings of calm and relaxation, and it's a great idea to just include the legs and feet in the foreground, allowing the viewer to imagine that they belong to him. It has a good atmosphere and also a story, engaging the viewer and capturing a mood. The image shows that you have a creative approach to your photography.
Your distant shoreline is nice and straight, and that's important.
Although I have seen a lot of images like this with the feet crossed (even more relaxed), I like the V shape made by the feet, like an open book, an entry into the far scene. I also like the inclusion of the fishing rod because it helps to break up the expanse of featureless water.

You used a very shallow depth of field/a wide aperture, and it looks like you focused on the far shore. This means that your legs and feet are out of focus. Also, there is a trace of what I think might be a canopy intruding into the top of the frame, which needs to be removed because it simply acts as a distraction. This suggests to me that you were in the shade, and this has caused the legs and feet to be underexposed. Your Exif Data records that the flash fired, which would have been a good idea, to put light into that shaded area, but it doesn't appear to have penetrated that area at all.
Although this can sometimes be addressed with imaging software, there is already a bit of noise/grain in the image, and lifting the shadows just creates even more.

For a seascape like this, I would suggest a narrow aperture and a larger depth of field. Small aperture settings can ensure that from the foreground to the horizon, the image is relatively in focus.

In my modification I cropped the top and left. I cropped the left to give symmetry to the legs, and cropped the top not only to remove the bit at the top, but also to place the shoreline one third down on the vertical. If you don't know anything about the Rule Of Thirds, you can simply Google for it and have a read. When deciding on how much space to allow the sky, you have to consider where your subject lies. Here, it lies in the water area, and so I gave that area two thirds of the vertical space.
I brightened the image and lifted the shadow area, then applied a Levels adjustment, and also removed a lot of the noise. I then cloned out the white stones in the bottom right corner.
To view the modification, click on the "Modifications" tab under your picture, then click on the picture to enlarge it.

Pamela.

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