Back Modifications (1)
Views 48 Unique 27 Award Shortlist   

In tlhe clouds

By JuanCarlos
Catholic church built in the mountains of northern Guatemala. Rainforest ecosystem

Tags: Landscapes Guatemala Landscape and travel

Save & earn with MPB; trade-in and buy pre-loved

Comments


banehawi Plus
17 2.7k 4281 Canada
30 Sep 2016 11:53PM
This is potentially a good shot, but I cant see any area in it that appears sharp, or focused?


The shutter speed is fine for the focal length, so Im not sure if its shake, failure to focus, or maybe condensation on the lens.

I tried a mod, but It really cant be sharpened. I assume you understand that using +5/3 when in Manual mode has no effect on the image? It will take effect only if one of the other modes is being used.


Regards


Willie
1 Oct 2016 12:25AM
Thanks for your comments Willie. I really dont understand when you said "using +5/3 when in Manual mode has no effect on the image". May you explain me that.
Thanks again
prabhusinha 13 5 5 India
1 Oct 2016 5:55AM
Awesome location setting.
paulbroad Plus
14 131 1293 United Kingdom
1 Oct 2016 7:50AM
The basis of a good image and composition. slightly under exposed and very unsharp. I suspect camera shake even at that shutter speed. although it may be a focusing issue. You would need to lock focus on the building before recomposing for the image, but then something should be sharp and nothing is.

Any exposure compensation setting does not work when the camera is set to manual. You must apply the correction by adjusting shutter speed and/or aperture yourself, manually! You need to inspect the image closely yourself on your computer. look at it at 100% magnification. That shows you if it is sharp in the right places.

paul
mrswoolybill Plus
15 3.1k 2475 United Kingdom
1 Oct 2016 8:51AM
I do like the composition, it gives a strong sense of the relationship between the church and its surroundings. I think it's because of the balance between cloud advancing top left, and church lower right, solid and resilient.

Like Willie, I am puzzled by the softness, because 1/400 second should be fast enough for the focal length.

Moira
dudler Plus
18 1.8k 1892 England
1 Oct 2016 11:07AM
As Willie and others have said, this is puzzlingly unsharp.

It ought to work: my suggestion is to look carefully at your camera technique, for focussing and holding the camera. We always assume that everyone knows how to hold a camera, and then you see people waving a camera in one hand with a long lens on it. You need to stand and hold the instrument as carefully as a marksman would hold a rifle with a telescopic sight.

Stand with your feet slightly apart. Hold the camera with your left hand around the lens, right hand gripping the handgrip firmly but gently. Tuck your elbows in by your sides. Breathe out just before you expose, and aim to move nothing but your shutter release finger - and move that as little and as gently as you can: stroke it, rather than jabbing at it.

Of course, it could be a focus problem: that requres analysis of how you focussed.
5 Oct 2016 6:48PM

Quote:The basis of a good image and composition. slightly under exposed and very unsharp. I suspect camera shake even at that shutter speed. although it may be a focusing issue. You would need to lock focus on the building before recomposing for the image, but then something should be sharp and nothing is.

Any exposure compensation setting does not work when the camera is set to manual. You must apply the correction by adjusting shutter speed and/or aperture yourself, manually! You need to inspect the image closely yourself on your computer. look at it at 100% magnification. That shows you if it is sharp in the right places.

paul



tHANK YOU for your comments Paul.
5 Oct 2016 6:49PM

Quote:I do like the composition, it gives a strong sense of the relationship between the church and its surroundings. I think it's because of the balance between cloud advancing top left, and church lower right, solid and resilient.

Like Willie, I am puzzled by the softness, because 1/400 second should be fast enough for the focal length.

Moira



Thanks for your comments Moira. I will work in them.
5 Oct 2016 6:52PM

Quote:As Willie and others have said, this is puzzlingly unsharp.

It ought to work: my suggestion is to look carefully at your camera technique, for focussing and holding the camera. We always assume that everyone knows how to hold a camera, and then you see people waving a camera in one hand with a long lens on it. You need to stand and hold the instrument as carefully as a marksman would hold a rifle with a telescopic sight.

Stand with your feet slightly apart. Hold the camera with your left hand around the lens, right hand gripping the handgrip firmly but gently. Tuck your elbows in by your sides. Breathe out just before you expose, and aim to move nothing but your shutter release finger - and move that as little and as gently as you can: stroke it, rather than jabbing at it.

Of course, it could be a focus problem: that requres analysis of how you focussed.



Dudler: Thank you for your detailed comments. I will work to improve the focus of my photographs. I do not know what the problem was caused because I used the auto focus in this photo. Greetings.
dudler Plus
18 1.8k 1892 England
7 Oct 2016 4:19PM
The trick is to work out why the AF went wrong, then.

Careful analysis of mistakes is the road to wisdom!

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.