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Comments


6 Oct 2010 10:35AM
Lovely scene, well captured Paul

Chris

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witchcraft 7 27 5 United Kingdom
6 Oct 2010 11:28AM
Nice view but it has a rather over processed look to it. The bush left and tree right don't actually add too much either. Its a great view but it could be a lot more. Could you post the RAW to let us see what you were playing with please.

Best regards

Mark
6 Oct 2010 11:43AM
I want to go walking there now looking at this image
andylea 8 37 1 United Kingdom
6 Oct 2010 12:06PM
wonderful colour and light paul a cracker nice one Wink
andy
6 Oct 2010 3:53PM
Beautiful landscape and very well captured Paul Smile
Ricky.
PaulLiley 7 2 13 United Kingdom
6 Oct 2010 4:41PM

Quote:Nice view but it has a rather over processed look to it. The bush left and tree right don't actually add too much either. Its a great view but it could be a lot more. Could you post the RAW to let us see what you were playing with please.

Best regards

Mark


Thanks for your comments Mark. It wasn't shot in RAW only JPEG. As I can only post one per day it can't be today. Used photoshop to reduce the highlights on the rock which (a bit like limestone-its granite actually- tends to reflect a lot of light). I increased the sat on the sky and the greens. Apart from a small amount of sharpening that's it. I agree the fg tree should have been off centre more and the one half on the right frame shouldn't be there. I appreciate your constructive comments. I have taken more on the same trip which are further back in my PF if you want to look. one was a pano of the valley. Paul
6 Oct 2010 6:58PM
Great shot.well done.
6 Oct 2010 7:42PM
A wonderful scene so very well captured, Paul.
Roy
Source 6
6 Oct 2010 8:37PM
Lovely capture and scene
-source
7 Oct 2010 3:22PM
great landscape shot.
PaulLiley 7 2 13 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2010 9:47AM
Many thanks to Mark (Witchcraft) for his modification and comments. Appreciated. Paul
Nikola 6 1 India
8 Oct 2010 1:40PM
Wonderful.
9 Oct 2010 10:22AM
Well composed
Porthos 6 1 Northern Ireland
10 Oct 2010 9:09PM
Looks like a fantastic place to photograph.....Derek
metro074 6 8 Australia
10 Oct 2010 10:26PM
A superb place to be taking this beautiful picture. The detail and depth is wonderful. There are so many tones here. Excellent capture Paul well done
Carol
excellent landscape paul.ray
photophantom 8 108 3 Philippines
11 Oct 2010 11:10AM
gorgeous landscape
Dennis
Ray42 8 3 England
12 Oct 2010 8:33AM
A lovely scene
12 Oct 2010 9:22PM
Lovely capture.well done.
DRicherby 8 269 725 United Kingdom
14 Oct 2010 12:33PM
I agree with witchcraft that this looks a little over-processed. It's not a massive thing but it doesn't look quite right. I think the problem is that it looks a bit too contrasty and vivid for what I perceive the lighting conditions to be.

I think that a fairly small white balance problem has led you down the wrong path while editing. There are two clues that the white balance is off: the mountains are rather blue and the darker clouds, which should be grey, are also quite blue. The extra blueness decreases contrast and makes the greens less vividly green but increasing contrast and saturation doesn't address the root cause. (Sharpening works by increasing contrast locally.)

Setting the colour temperature to somewhere around 5,500–5,700K warms the blue out of the clouds and decreases it in the mountains. You can then tweak the saturation of the greens if you need to but, with less blue in them, they're already purer (i.e., more saturated) so you probably won't need to go as far. Sharpening at a smaller radius will give you sharpness without pushing up the contrast.

A quick explanation of sharpening and contrast. Unsharp mask has the effect of increasing contrast locally, i.e., darkening regions of shadow and lightening regions of highlight that are close together. However, the centre of a large shadow is far from any highlights so it's not affected. Across the whole image, the darkness of shadows and brightness of highlights remains roughly the same; it's only small regions close to each other, or the boundaries of larger regions that are altered. When you sharpen with a small radius (one or two pixels), this is perceived mostly as an increase in sharpness because it picks out boundaries and makes them more distinct. But if you sharpen at a larger radius, the effect is to darken shadows of about that size and lighten highlights of about that size, which is seen as an increase in contrast, as it's affecting more than just boundaries. You can use this to your advantage: USM with small radius and fairly high strength sharpens; with larger radius and smaller strength, it increases contrast but in a way that you can control quite precisely.
PaulLiley 7 2 13 United Kingdom
14 Oct 2010 1:23PM

Quote:I agree with witchcraft that this looks a little over-processed. It's not a massive thing but it doesn't look quite right. I think the problem is that it looks a bit too contrasty and vivid for what I perceive the lighting conditions to be.

I think that a fairly small white balance problem has led you down the wrong path while editing. There are two clues that the white balance is off: the mountains are rather blue and the darker clouds, which should be grey, are also quite blue. The extra blueness decreases contrast and makes the greens less vividly green but increasing contrast and saturation doesn't address the root cause. (Sharpening works by increasing contrast locally.)

Setting the colour temperature to somewhere around 5,500–5,700K warms the blue out of the clouds and decreases it in the mountains. You can then tweak the saturation of the greens if you need to but, with less blue in them, they're already purer (i.e., more saturated) so you probably won't need to go as far. Sharpening at a smaller radius will give you sharpness without pushing up the contrast.

A quick explanation of sharpening and contrast. Unsharp mask has the effect of increasing contrast locally, i.e., darkening regions of shadow and lightening regions of highlight that are close together. However, the centre of a large shadow is far from any highlights so it's not affected. Across the whole image, the darkness of shadows and brightness of highlights remains roughly the same; it's only small regions close to each other, or the boundaries of larger regions that are altered. When you sharpen with a small radius (one or two pixels), this is perceived mostly as an increase in sharpness because it picks out boundaries and makes them more distinct. But if you sharpen at a larger radius, the effect is to darken shadows of about that size and lighten highlights of about that size, which is seen as an increase in contrast, as it's affecting more than just boundaries. You can use this to your advantage: USM with small radius and fairly high strength sharpens; with larger radius and smaller strength, it increases contrast but in a way that you can control quite precisely.



Thanks Richard that helps a great deal. I thought I understood contrast, sharpening and the unsharp mask but you've clarified one or two points. Paul

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