Back Modifications (2)
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Malva sylvestris1

By nkargar1356
This photo was taken some time ago and I made changes to it with Photoshop
1- Converted from 3: 2 to 5: 7
2- The following changes have been made
brightness -20
contrast 70
hue 2
saturation 11
lightness -11
shadows

Tags: Flowers Macro Plants Flowers and plants Flowers and plants

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Comments


dudler Plus
18 1.7k 1877 England
19 Jun 2021 9:10PM
Thank you for the extra information on how you've processed this picture.

Maybe going the other way, with a less long and narrow format would be better: indeed, I think this looks good square.

Pictorially, I think there's a clash between the sunlit flower itself, and the big, dark, out of focus mass behind it. I think I might have tried a shot looking directly at the flower, showing all the petals, and hiding the shadowed area behind them.

Sunlight is harsh, and softer light can be far better - or you can hold a diffuser between the sun and a small subject to create and control the light as you want it. For this, you need a tripod or an assistant - but a tripod is often a good idea when you are shooting closeups in any case.
mrswoolybill Plus
14 2.9k 2455 United Kingdom
19 Jun 2021 9:30PM
Best to avoid bright sun, aim for gentler, more subdued light. You will get better colours and avoid the risk of overexposed areas.
Flower petals and leaves are very reflective...

John's crop is exactly what I immediately wanted to do. It transforms this from a random shot into a deliberate, considered, balanced composition. This is what you need to work on, I think.

Composition is about how we arrange lines in a frame in order to engage the viewer's interest, make the subject interesting and accessible; invite the viewer into the frame. That matters.
Moira
19 Jun 2021 9:39PM

Quote:Thank you for the extra information on how you've processed this picture.

Maybe going the other way, with a less long and narrow format would be better: indeed, I think this looks good square.

Pictorially, I think there's a clash between the sunlit flower itself, and the big, dark, out of focus mass behind it. I think I might have tried a shot looking directly at the flower, showing all the petals, and hiding the shadowed area behind them.

Sunlight is harsh, and softer light can be far better - or you can hold a diffuser between the sun and a small subject to create and control the light as you want it. For this, you need a tripod or an assistant - but a tripod is often a good idea when you are shooting closeups in any case.


Thank you
19 Jun 2021 9:40PM

Quote:Best to avoid bright sun, aim for gentler, more subdued light. You will get better colours and avoid the risk of overexposed areas.
Flower petals and leaves are very reflective...

John's crop is exactly what I immediately wanted to do. It transforms this from a random shot into a deliberate, considered, balanced composition. This is what you need to work on, I think.

Composition is about how we arrange lines in a frame in order to engage the viewer's interest, make the subject interesting and accessible; invite the viewer into the frame. That matters.
Moira


Thank you
mrswoolybill Plus
14 2.9k 2455 United Kingdom
20 Jun 2021 8:29AM
I've uploaded a modification to demonstrate some possibilities:

Cropped tighter, so that the flower 'sits' more comfortably in the space available;

Flipped horizontally so that the flower faces right, which gives a more positive, upbeat mood;

Highlights darkened slightly, to counteract the effect of strong sunlight;

A frame, to contain the image.

These are ideas for you to consider.
Moira
pamelajean Plus
15 1.6k 2237 United Kingdom
20 Jun 2021 10:44AM
Hello again, Naser.

I commented before about trying to get an image as near to perfect as possible when shooting instead of relying on Photoshop to produce the result you desire.

So, firstly, try to shoot flowers in the early morning or late afternoon. You will see here that strong light has given you deep dark shadows.
Also, overcast days are great for flower photography as clouds naturally diffuse light and your shot will be more evenly exposed. And windy or breezy days are best avoided unless you want lots of deliberate blur.

By continuously checking the depth-of-field with the preview button, close control over the final image is possible. How much of the flower do you want in focus? Alter your aperture accordingly.

Use a single focus point and place that on the centre of the flower, or the main one in a group. If going in much closer, stamens are a great focal point and some really good images can be produced using a shallow depth of field while you focus on the stamens of a flower.

Think about your background as well as your flower. Have it as clear and free from intrusions as possible, making sure there is nothing distracting there. The plainer the better. If that's not possible, use some card or material behind your subject for a clean backdrop. If there are unwanted intrusions, use something like a laundry peg to hold them back or away from your chosen flower.

Just a few tips.
Let's see some results based on the critiques you have received so far. You might like to deal with just one thing at a time, such as your composition. If so, tell us, in your Description Box, that's what you are doing.

Pamela.
21 Jun 2021 11:44AM

Quote:Hello again, Naser.

I commented before about trying to get an image as near to perfect as possible when shooting instead of relying on Photoshop to produce the result you desire.

So, firstly, try to shoot flowers in the early morning or late afternoon. You will see here that strong light has given you deep dark shadows.
Also, overcast days are great for flower photography as clouds naturally diffuse light and your shot will be more evenly exposed. And windy or breezy days are best avoided unless you want lots of deliberate blur.

By continuously checking the depth-of-field with the preview button, close control over the final image is possible. How much of the flower do you want in focus? Alter your aperture accordingly.

Use a single focus point and place that on the centre of the flower, or the main one in a group. If going in much closer, stamens are a great focal point and some really good images can be produced using a shallow depth of field while you focus on the stamens of a flower.

Think about your background as well as your flower. Have it as clear and free from intrusions as possible, making sure there is nothing distracting there. The plainer the better. If that's not possible, use some card or material behind your subject for a clean backdrop. If there are unwanted intrusions, use something like a laundry peg to hold them back or away from your chosen flower.

Just a few tips.
Let's see some results based on the critiques you have received so far. You might like to deal with just one thing at a time, such as your composition. If so, tell us, in your Description Box, that's what you are doing.

Pamela.


Thank you for your explanation

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