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Omega XVI

By Rogi
Just a sample of the type of macro shooting I enjoy doing, this is a 1957 Omega XVI timepiece in a rare Pink Gold (It was the first time Omega produced pieces to commemorate the Olympic games, for the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne) , under it is the Extract of the Archives from Omega detailing its production and other details (in the corner left is its original case) . What makes it a little more special is its delivery date of Lebanon and so close to 1958 War that it makes one think of what the watch may have been through.

I'd love some comments and critique on the composition and if the photo looks good (sharpness etc.). I try to adjust the subject or composition in the way that pleases my eye and not always adhering to any rules.

Tags: Close-up and macro Watch Omega

This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.

Comments


paulbroad 11 123 1256 United Kingdom
16 Apr 2018 2:18PM
A good record. To be hyper critical, it's not macro, it's a close up. Macro is generally considered to be half life size up to 10 life size, then things become micro. There is no such thing as a macro zoom despite manufacturers names - all macro lenses are fixed focal length.

Ideally, nice if there had been some tonal contrast. we have a light coloured watch and strap on white paper. I realise it cannot be a dark watch, but possibly the typed details on a deeper coloured paper?

The image is adequately sharp, but f32 is not a good idea with a zoom lens, quality starts to drop after f16 due to internal diffraction. Even true macro lenses can stasrt to struggle at f32 and they are designed to do it. Stay with a maximum of f22 and arrange the subject to cope with available depth of field.

Paul

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TanyaH Plus
15 1.3k 395 United Kingdom
16 Apr 2018 3:23PM
Generally, I like it. The info page behind the watch is a nice touch, because it adds a context to the piece itself.

In terms of adjustments, I've given the whole image a tweak in Levels, because your whites were more of a grey tone. Because that lowered the contract of the watch itself, I brought that back with a bit of masking using a layer mask.

Then I did a bit of cleaning up of the various dust spots (think they're dust spots anyway - whatever, make sure your paper is perfectly clean with this kind of close up photography, otherwise everything gets magnified - even the dust you can't see!).

I cropped fractionally, to remove a couple of things - the half lines of writing top and bottom, and the 'h' on the right hand edge at the top. Then I did a little output sharpening, just to give everything a little more crispness.

Originally I did clone out the small amount of unseen text below the watch face itself, relating to the Watch ref.: number, but then put it back in because it's integral to the validity of the watch! It's also kind of nice having it half-seen, as it proves providence yet gives nothing away Smile

Tanya

16 Apr 2018 5:59PM

Quote:A good record. To be hyper critical, it's not macro, it's a close up. Macro is generally considered to be half life size up to 10 life size, then things become micro. There is no such thing as a macro zoom despite manufacturers names - all macro lenses are fixed focal length.

Ideally, nice if there had been some tonal contrast. we have a light coloured watch and strap on white paper. I realise it cannot be a dark watch, but possibly the typed details on a deeper coloured paper?

The image is adequately sharp, but f32 is not a good idea with a zoom lens, quality starts to drop after f16 due to internal diffraction. Even true macro lenses can stasrt to struggle at f32 and they are designed to do it. Stay with a maximum of f22 and arrange the subject to cope with available depth of field.

Paul



Thank you so much for your advice and comments Smile it really means a lot as it will help me learn and progress in photography. Close up it is Grin we always call it macro for some reason but good to learn the proper term.
I agree, but unfortunately that is the manufacturer's (Omega) issued paper and they only print in white (a tad beige) with silver trim. I tried to make the best of the situation by catching the darker hues in the timepiece.

I'll try and redo the shot sometime this week (after exams hopefully) and see if I can achieve a different look with f.22 or lower. Maybe a new pose might work a bit better in this situation.

Thank you so much Paul for the time and advice that you took to guide me on the right path.

With Regards

Igor
16 Apr 2018 6:24PM

Quote:Generally, I like it. The info page behind the watch is a nice touch, because it adds a context to the piece itself.

In terms of adjustments, I've given the whole image a tweak in Levels, because your whites were more of a grey tone. Because that lowered the contract of the watch itself, I brought that back with a bit of masking using a layer mask.

Then I did a bit of cleaning up of the various dust spots (think they're dust spots anyway - whatever, make sure your paper is perfectly clean with this kind of close up photography, otherwise everything gets magnified - even the dust you can't see!).

I cropped fractionally, to remove a couple of things - the half lines of writing top and bottom, and the 'h' on the right hand edge at the top. Then I did a little output sharpening, just to give everything a little more crispness.

Originally I did clone out the small amount of unseen text below the watch face itself, relating to the Watch ref.: number, but then put it back in because it's integral to the validity of the watch! It's also kind of nice having it half-seen, as it proves providence yet gives nothing away Smile

Tanya




Thank you so much for your advice and guidance Smile Tanya

I'll have to look into an image adjustment software, normally I usually just take the shot and then live with how it turned out, maybe go back another day with similar conditions and redo, possibly with some cropping here and there, but I think its always good to explore new things. Especially for the adjustments to the image it is something that I think a newbie like me should learn and it really makes a difference to the photo.

I'll download the adjusted image and inspect it, I'll look at adjusting the area I work in and cleaning it off more, that is one of those things that I never realise is there until the image is on my computer. It is also a combination of dust/dots on the paper, it isn't a clear white paper (very similar to one of the papers in an art shop where they have a recyclable dot design). There is am amply amount of dust visible on some sections near the watch.

I like the lighting more in my shot (as I'm half Count Dracula and like things a bit darker Grin ) but your adjustments make the image look much sharper yet still maintain those nice colors of the piece and what we love calling the character of the piece in watch collecting.

For my self critique, (I should have added this originally in the original post but wasn't sure where to post it). I think I should have included more of Lebanon instead of ending up cutting half of the title and half of Lebanon in the image, its more a character of the piece thing, as most of these Omega XVI were issued to other countries and its somewhat of a rarity to have ended up there, especially at a time when the country was in a state of transition.

- This shot was handheld and took about 3-4 takes, I've only recently included my tripod, it helps immensely and cuts down on hand fatigue by a huge factor.

- Lighting, your editing Tanya really show the power of light and I'll start taking more shots and experimenting with all forms of it.


iancrowson Plus
8 211 146 United Kingdom
16 Apr 2018 7:14PM
This is a very nice watch. Very collectable. The photo could be better as described above
I have an interest in watches and look at hundreds of photos of them. My suggestion for your retake of the photo is to ensure the hands do not cover details. Either wait for a suitable time or set the hands so all details are showing.
Use a tripod if you have one, get as close as the lens will focus and follow the advice above.
regards
Ian
banehawi Plus
14 1.9k 3938 Canada
16 Apr 2018 8:09PM
Very well done Igor.

I noticed you mentioned in the forums that you were interested in a 105mm macro, - I think you would really appreciate one. Nikon or Sigma are both excellent.


I did upload a mod; I notice you used flash and used it well; the face of the watch, being a little reflective, combined with a whitish background likely resulted in the face being a little darker than it could be.

Ive addressed that, sharpened the face, and added a vignette.


Regards from Peterborough On.


Willie
pamelajean Plus
12 1.1k 2040 United Kingdom
16 Apr 2018 8:42PM
Good Evening, Igor, and welcome to EPZ and its Critique Gallery.

There is a lot of good advice above.
When you try this again, you'll be able to use it to your advantage.

Just a few other things that come to mind.
Firstly, you have a nice pleasing diagonal on the watch and strap - corner to corner in the frame.
Secondly, you mention the watch's case, but we can only see a small part of it. Could you use it to rest the watch strap on and show more of it? If it could cover the red area on the left, all the better. So, watch, box and paper only inside the frame, with no distractions.

This might be a bit of a struggle setting up because you won't want to cover too much of the text. However, if you try a vertical or square format, it might just work.

Pamela.
dudler Plus
15 733 1399 England
16 Apr 2018 9:28PM
Welcome to Ephotozine, Igor.

As I often wear a steel Seamaster, this rather caught my eye...

You've got good technical advice above, and htis is a good starting place for shots like this. It's well exposed and sharp: not everyone gets there.

I want to consider hte lighting and composition - the data sheet is a nice idea, and really fills in the background, in both senses.

Using different light might allow interesting things, though you'd either need a lot of flash kit, or a tripod. I may now have to play with lighting and a watch tomorrow...

A flash on the camera gives the sort of ahrd shadows close in to the subject that you have here. Using an off-camera source, possibly diffused, can give interesting shadows, adding character and mood. It will make for less of a record shot, but maybe something that works better as a picture.

Editing sftware can be the way to polish things up a little, or it can transform the image. I'm going to do a moody conversion to monochrome, to give you some idea of the possibilities...
Jestertheclown 10 7.8k 252 England
16 Apr 2018 10:19PM

Quote: My suggestion for your retake of the photo is to ensure the hands do not cover details. Either wait for a suitable time or set the hands so all details are showing.

The first thing that I spotted.
Have a look at images of watches or clocks for sale and you'll notice that the hand are nearly always set at ten minutes to two or ten minutes past ten.
mrswoolybill Plus
11 1.3k 1967 United Kingdom
17 Apr 2018 8:00AM
I'm a bit late on the scene, a warm welcome from me too.

I like the way you have approached this, it's both a record shot and a composition. The first thing that I noticed was that the diagonals of the strap run from top left to bottom right corners, that's strong. Plus a downward diagonal has a downbeat feel, it suggests that the past was better than the future.

Unless you are using the image to advertise the item for sale, there's enough wording visible for me. It gives the context, it excites the imagination. I would however have placed the watch a little to the right to avoid that arc of red on the left.

But I would definitely not use flash for this. It has created a heavy dark shadow under the strap (that was the second thing I noticed... ), and also a reflection under the case. I would look for more even light, shoot in Raw, and work on contrast afterwards.
Moira
dudler Plus
15 733 1399 England
18 Apr 2018 3:05PM
I've been playing. See THIS for a couple of options if you mount the camera on a tripod.
18 Apr 2018 4:47PM

Quote:I've been playing. See THIS for a couple of options if you mount the camera on a tripod.


Love your shots and thank you for the tips as well Smile after exams Iíll redo and try some new ones with my piece.
dudler Plus
15 733 1399 England
18 Apr 2018 6:10PM
The tripod allows you so much flexibility...

If you have mirror lock, use it, along with the self-timer, so that you don't have to touch the camera (potentially vibrating it and blurring the image).

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