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Practicing panning.

By alloutraw
Hi.
So I've been trying to practice my panning technique. I took over 400 photos at this event and this is one that came out the best.

I understand the background is cluttered, I was a little hampered with where I could stand to get the cars on the straighter sections for panning.


Anymore advice for panning technique would be great.


Thanks for looking

Carl

Tags: Circuit Motorsport Motor racing Sports and action Panning Technique

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Comments


pablophotographer 8 1.2k 351
5 Aug 2019 9:43PM
Hi. I do not see the backgeound posing a problem, as a spectacle the motorsport attracts viewers. Your panning has blurred them nicely, whereas the 205GTI looks sharp.
You could level it if you want. But in downhill, they go faster!

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dark_lord Plus
15 2.3k 582 England
5 Aug 2019 9:45PM
It's good to see you've gone out practicing.
You will have a lot of rejects, don't worry about it. If you only show your best images, even if it's not may, people will think you're very good, whereas showing q hundred so-so image won't have the same impression.
I like the positioning of the car in the frame, somewhere for the car to 'move into'. The background, while 'cluttered' does set the scene and it doesn't impinge on the car so we can see that clearly. I guess this si cropped slightly from the whole frame, but that's not an issue as it's what you have in the version you're presenting and how you go about that. Having room to play with a crop is helpful.

If I were to be really critical there is a trace of movement as the lettering isn't completely crisp.
But, within acceptable levels.

I'd hve expected more background blur/streaks at 1/80, but there are so many reasons such as focal lenght and relative speeds and distances to factor in. With practice maybe you could get this at 1/50. Though given you were already at low ISO and a small aperture there's not much lower you can go! Certainly many would be pleased with this.
5 Aug 2019 10:07PM
Thanks for the feed back.
It is cropped only slightly.
I did notice the lettering but i was just happy i got the majority sharp haha.
It was quite a bright day if I went any slower my apature would have been f16+. Although it probably wouldn't have mattered.
To be honest most images looked garbage on my LCD screen so I didn't risk going lower aswell. Maybe I should just try it next time and see what comes out of it.
viscostatic 13 43 5 United Kingdom
5 Aug 2019 10:18PM
I agree with all that Keith has said. I try to use 1/50 sec shutter speed for panning if possible. Yes the background is busy but that's what these events are like; it's all part of the atmosphere. Perhaps some of the smaller, single venue stage rallies would give you more of a choice of background as there can be more freedom for spectators to move around. I have tried to darken the background slightly. Whether it improves the image or not is a moot point.
6 Aug 2019 9:21AM
I will give 1/50 a go next time I'm out. Not sure I'll get many if any keepers at that speed haha.
I could go track side at my local circuit which is where this is but I haven't gotten around to getting public liability insurance.


Quote:I agree with all that Keith has said. I try to use 1/50 sec shutter speed for panning if possible. Yes the background is busy but that's what these events are like; it's all part of the atmosphere. Perhaps some of the smaller, single venue stage rallies would give you more of a choice of background as there can be more freedom for spectators to move around. I have tried to darken the background slightly. Whether it improves the image or not is a moot point.
paulbroad Plus
12 131 1285 United Kingdom
6 Aug 2019 9:22AM
I would crop the top to a panoramic view which emphasises the speed and removes a lot of the clutter. As noted, clutter at such events can be a problem - there may be better viewpoints though.

Don't just concentrate on panning at the expense of general technique. This is under exposed and you are on manual which means you can be panning from one light level to another and thus wrong exposure. I would be on ISO400 and shutter priority. The smaller aperture will not matter in terms of depth of field when panning.

For any photography there are two basics to absolutely master - get the exposure right, get the subject sharp.

paul
dudler Plus
16 895 1504 England
6 Aug 2019 9:28AM
As a technical exercise, it's working, and yoru hit rate will be higher next time, I suspect.

Stopping down all the way is fine if you need to - the reason that we often advise against doing so is because it lowers the quality a fraction. But compare that with the difference in the effect you're getting from a slow shutter speed and panning and it is - as htey say in the ads - 'worth it'!
6 Aug 2019 10:24AM
Thanks Paul
I'll try this next time.


Quote:I would crop the top to a panoramic view which emphasises the speed and removes a lot of the clutter. As noted, clutter at such events can be a problem - there may be better viewpoints though.

Don't just concentrate on panning at the expense of general technique. This is under exposed and you are on manual which means you can be panning from one light level to another and thus wrong exposure. I would be on ISO400 and shutter priority. The smaller aperture will not matter in terms of depth of field when panning.

For any photography there are two basics to absolutely master - get the exposure right, get the subject sharp.

paul

cosmicnode 9 25 England
6 Aug 2019 10:44AM
I would rotate the image to get it level, You are using f16 which is a area where the lens looses sharpness and gains aberrations , try using a ND filter I have used a ND8 and think a ND16 may be the best choice.this will allow you to shoot at base iso but reduce aperture by 4 stops to f4, with the same slow shutter speed, whilst at the same time reducing the field of view and blurring the background more. You may have to adjust clarity in PP. Set to release priority for the shutter, use Auto ISO which is good on a Nikon camera and shoot continuous AF, use aperture priority and as the lens is zoomed min shutter speed is adjusted to suit the focal length when using auto shutter speed in the Iso setting this then can be adjusted faster or slower using a slider in the auto iso menu. EDIT I have looked at reviews for your camera and you may not have the more sophisticated auto iso settings of later camera's
banehawi Plus
15 2.1k 4020 Canada
6 Aug 2019 12:11PM
This looks pretty decent to me, and youre certainly improving.


Aperture is a bit small,- remember your far away, so small apertures are not necessary; you can get good performance with f/8.


Quick mod uploaded.


Regards


Willie
6 Aug 2019 3:26PM
Thanks Willie

It was a bright day that's why my aperture was so small. Maybe I need to get some nd filters as suggested above.
paulbroad Plus
12 131 1285 United Kingdom
6 Aug 2019 8:42PM
No, don't mess with ND filters for sport. Just not need and a further complication and dimmer for the viewfinder. You will see little difference in quality with a decent lens between f8 and f16 in terms of resolution with this type of subject.

I am not aware of any accomplished high speed sport photographers that use ND filters - they do not need them,

Paul
cosmicnode 9 25 England
7 Aug 2019 9:12AM
I tend to talk to other photographers at motor races and many do use ND filters or Polarising filters to be able to shoot with the lenses at faster F stops. Nikon listened to professional motorsport photographers when they introduced the low iso setting on their pro cameras for this reason https://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2018/07/17/pixels-for-geeks-a-peek-inside-nikons-super-secret-sensor-design-lab
you should try it especially on a bright day,

"While a minimum ISO of 200 isn’t an issue if you’re shooting at smaller apertures or in lower light, it’s a real issue if you’re trying to shoot at wide apertures in bright light, or to use slower shutter speeds to achieve motion blur. Of course, you can always use an ND filter in such situations, but they’re a nuisance, especially if you’re using multiple lenses, and want to switch back and forth between tack-sharp and creatively blurred shots. I dont think the OP has a low 64 iso but he can use a ND filter to achieve the same results the professionals want, slow shutter speed with the lens oren as much as possible.

This is one area where Nikon’s dedicated sensor design has paid off for them: The D850 has the first true ISO 64 capability in an SLR. (Other cameras have special “Lo” ISO settings that will get there, but those come at the expense of poor tonal qualities and blown highlights.) Sanbongi-san told me that they developed the D850’s true ISO 64 capability in response to requests from motor-sports shooters, who wanted to shoot at large apertures and slow shutter speeds, so they could pan to follow the race cars while dramatically motion-blurring the background.

I don’t know enough about sensor design to understand the details of what’s involved, but when I asked Sanbongi-san what his team’s proudest achievements were, he mentioned the D850’s true ISO 64 first."

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