Back Modifications (2)
Views: 62 (29 Unique)  Award Shortlist   

Rainbow Ferry

By Mike43
The Uig to Lochmaddy Ferry one rainy april day, not sure if I should crop a bit from the right so that the ferry is not in the centre, comments please.

Tags: Landscape and travel

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This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.

Comments


Suzicoo 4 480 United Kingdom
28 Apr 2013 3:28PM
I think the the composition works as it is, reason being your eye is naturally dawn to the rainbow, IMO
Suzicoo

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pamelajean Plus
10 960 1818 United Kingdom
28 Apr 2013 4:07PM
An excellent capture, Mike, with the ferry just approaching the large rainbow, about to go through it, quite magical. I love the way the rainbow goes right down into the water, and the wonderful light on the foreground rocks (?).
When capturing a rainbow, it's not unusual to find that the area behind it is a lot darker than the area in front of it, in other words the area underneath the arc is often darker. I don't see that here, and if I did, I think I'd have placed the rainbow across the centre of the frame, with one half light and the other half dark.
Since you ask about the ferry being in the centre, I would agree with a crop to the right, which I have done in my modification, placing the ferry on the thirds intersection bottom right. It keeps your horizon almost central, but I didn't want to crop any more for fear of losing any part of the rainbow. I also gave the image a Levels adjustment and darkened it, to enhance the colours. I ran the burn tool over the ferry so that it stood out better.
The use of negative space is such a personal decision. The ferry is moving to the left, and so it does need space in front of it, but doesn't need so much behind it. With moving objects, the eye will naturally follow the path the subject is on and having no space for it to move into can leave the shot unbalanced. Generally speaking, although it's not a hard and fast rule, if you place the main subject at the dead-centre of your picture, it can feel static and dull, whereas an off-centre subject is more pleasing and dynamic. Having the ferry heading towards the middle of the frame, in my opinion, makes the image more pleasing to the eye and stops it from guiding the viewer's eye out of the frame.
Here's another interesting consideration. Because we read from left to right we also tend to look at an image from left to right, and so it feels more comfortable when an object is moving in that way. See my second modification, which is simply mirrored, and see how you feel about it.
Pamela.
Mike43 5 17 21 England
28 Apr 2013 5:19PM

Quote:An excellent capture, Mike, with the ferry just approaching the large rainbow, about to go through it, quite magical. I love the way the rainbow goes right down into the water, and the wonderful light on the foreground rocks (?).
When capturing a rainbow, it's not unusual to find that the area behind it is a lot darker than the area in front of it, in other words the area underneath the arc is often darker. I don't see that here, and if I did, I think I'd have placed the rainbow across the centre of the frame, with one half light and the other half dark.
Since you ask about the ferry being in the centre, I would agree with a crop to the right, which I have done in my modification, placing the ferry on the thirds intersection bottom right. It keeps your horizon almost central, but I didn't want to crop any more for fear of losing any part of the rainbow. I also gave the image a Levels adjustment and darkened it, to enhance the colours. I ran the burn tool over the ferry so that it stood out better.
The use of negative space is such a personal decision. The ferry is moving to the left, and so it does need space in front of it, but doesn't need so much behind it. With moving objects, the eye will naturally follow the path the subject is on and having no space for it to move into can leave the shot unbalanced. Generally speaking, although it's not a hard and fast rule, if you place the main subject at the dead-centre of your picture, it can feel static and dull, whereas an off-centre subject is more pleasing and dynamic. Having the ferry heading towards the middle of the frame, in my opinion, makes the image more pleasing to the eye and stops it from guiding the viewer's eye out of the frame.
Here's another interesting consideration. Because we read from left to right we also tend to look at an image from left to right, and so it feels more comfortable when an object is moving in that way. See my second modification, which is simply mirrored, and see how you feel about it.
Pamela.



Hi Pamela,
Thanks for above comments, was moving in the same direction with your mod (Right to Left) which I like. It is always nice to get a second opining.
Mike.
NDODS Plus
5 4.9k 125 United Kingdom
28 Apr 2013 6:43PM
A wonderfully pleasing and in many way a rather comforting composition which really draws the eye and lifts ones spirits

Regards Nathan GrinGrinGrin
28 Apr 2013 9:08PM
It touches the heart... This is what I expect from Art. Wonderful!
mrswoolybill Plus
9 932 1464 United Kingdom
28 Apr 2013 9:59PM
Pamela's Mods touch on an interesting paradox. In your original upload the boat is head leftwards (retrogressive, towards the past), but the arc of the rainbow is a rising diagonal, pushing rightwards - that's positive, optimistic, looking to the future.
I rather like Pamela's second Mod. It seems to place the boat as sailing ever onwards, determinedly, but perhaps against destiny...
Moira

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